Illuminated
1

[Biblia latina]. Biblia latina. Nuremberg, Koberger, 14. VI. 1478. Nuremberg, Koberger, 14. VI. 1478. Large folio (280 x 360 mm). Including Menardus monachus. (1), CCCCLXI, (6) ff., with two coloured historiated initials. 16th century blindstamped pigskin binding over wooden boards, wants clasps.

EUR 50,000.00

Koberger's third Latin Bible, printed with the same types as the second: in the splendic Gothic typeface which Koberger used exclusively for his Bibles; at the same time, the earliest type he is known to have used (cf. Klemm, Bibliogr. Mus., 722). The initial on fol. i shows the evangelist Mark with the lion; the tendril decoration reached from the upper edge (slightly trimmed) to the lower one, ending in a coat of arms bearing the monogram "S-A-B". The second historiated initial on fol. iiii shows the Fall from Grace (Adam and Eve in paradise, with the apple tree and the serpent in the centre); here, the tendrils reach as far as the lower third of the page and also end in a coat of arms. Very exactingly rubricated throughout; signed at the end: "91 Jo fec". Several handwritten ownerships to fol. A1r, some contemporary, others as late as 1876: the name and printed bookplate of "C. R. Earley, Ridgway, Pa." (1823-98). Several manuscript marginalia. Some slight browning to the gutter of the first few leaves, staining to upper edge of fol. i. Insignificant waterstaining to upper edge of several leaves; occasional foxing or tiny smudged inkstains. Handwritten marginalia trimmed in places, but altogether a crisp, wide-margined copy. Some staining to the mightly binding; edges as well as a crack to the upper cover have been unobtrusively repaired.
¶ Hain 3068. Goff B-556. GW 4232. BMC II, 415. Polain 648. Pellechet 2296. Oates 988. Hase 27.

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A lost Arabic text on the use of drugs
2

Serapion, Johannes, the younger. Liber Serapionis aggregatus in medicinis simplicibus. [Add. Galenus]:... De virtute centaureae. Venice, Reynaldus de Novimagio (Rainald of Nimeguen), 8 June 1479. Venice, Reynaldus de Novimagio (Rainald of Nimeguen), 8 June 1479. Folio. 136 leaves. 17th calf (rebacked).

EUR 18,000.00

Latin translation of an Arabic treatise on simple drugs, traditionally attributed to "Pseudo-Serapion" (or Serapion the Younger), but recently identified as the "Kitab al-adwiya almufrada" (Book on Simple Drugs) by Ibn Wafid (d. 1067), a pharmacologist and physician from Toledo. Ibn Al-Wafid was a man of immense knowledge in all medical matters and therapeutics, with the skills to treat grave and insidious diseases and affliction. He preferred dietetic measures; if drugs were needed, he gave precedence to the simplest ones over compound drugs, and among these, he recommended the least complex, to be used only sparingly and in the lowest dosage possible. While the original Arabic version of the book is considered lost, a manuscript written in Hebrew-Arabic as well as partial translations in Latin and Catalan are preserved. This translation was prepared around 1290 by Simon Januensis (Simon of Genoa) and Abraham ben Shem-Tob of Tortosa. Very rare: a single copy in postwar auction records (Sotheby's, 1977: £1500).
¶ HC 14692*. Goff S468. GW M41691. Proctor 4433. BMC V 255. BSB-Ink S-300. GAL S I, 887. P. Dilg, "The Liber aggregatus in medicinis simplicibus of Pseudo Serapion: An Influential Work of Medical Arabism", in: Islam and the Italian Renaissance, ed. by C. Burnett and A. Contadini, Warburg Institute Colloquia 5 (London, 1999), pp. 221-231. P. E. Pormann, "Yuhanna ibn Sarabiyun: Further Studies into the Transmission of his Works", in: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 14 (2004), 233-262.

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A famous tract against Islam
3

[Alphonsus de Spina. Fortalicium fidei contra iudeos saracenos aliosque christiane fidei... inimicos]. [Lyon], Guillaume Balsarin, 22. V. 1487. [Lyon], Guillaume Balsarin, 22. V. 1487. Small folio (209 x 291 mm). 248 unnumbered leaves (without the first and last blank, as usual). Gothic type, 2 cols., 51 lines. With a woodcut in the text on fol. a2r and printer's device at the end. A single ink initial on p. a2 supplied by the owner. 18th century full calf with panelled boards and giltstamped spine label. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.

EUR 18,000.00

Rare edition; a single copy in Great Britain. The "Fortalitatium fidei", the principal work (written c. 1458) of the baptized Spanish Jew de Spina, is considered the "methodical and ideological foundation of the Inquisition. The book, divided into five chapters, targets chiefly Jews and Muslims" (cf. LMA I, 408f.). Of the five books, "the first [is] directed against those who deny the Divinity of Christ, the second against heretics, the third against the Jews, and the fourth against Islam and the Muslims, while the fifth book treats of the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell. In this last book the author dwells at length upon the demons and their hatred of men; the powers they have over men and the diminution of these powers, owing to the victory of Christ on the Cross, the final condition of the demons, etc." (Catholic Encyclopaedia). "Ouvrage fort curieux de ce théologien espagnol [...] il était dit-on d'origine juive, c'est pour cela que son 'Fortalicium' pèut ètre classé dans une bibliothèque kabbalistique" (Caillet). Part 3, on the inquities of the Jews, is a veritable encyclopaedia of mediaeval antisemitic libel, containing numbered lists of Jewish "cruelties" and refutations of the Jews' supposed anti-Christian arguments. The section on Islam lists the numerous Saracen wars, while the fifth book is devoted to the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell and its resident demons, whose population the author calculates at ober 133 million; this is one of the earliest printed discussions of witchcraft and a precursor to the "Malleus maleficarum", the first edition of which appeared in the same year as this present edition. - Occasional contemporary ink marginalia (some touched by the binder's knife); some slight worming, confined to blank margins. Some even browning and a weak waterstain, but a very good, wide-margined copy with an 18th century noble collection stamp (crowned Gothic letter G; not in Lugt) on the first leaf.
¶ HC 874*. Goff A-542. GW 1577. Proctor 8575. BMC VIII, 277. Polain 159. Pellechet 564. Coumont (Witchcraft) S84.4. Cf. Caillet 10306 ("Incunable gothique rare", only 16th c. eds.).

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With a humanistic manuscript
4

Pomponius Mela. De situ orbis. Hermolai Barbari fideliter emendatus. [Venice], Giovanni Battista Sessa, 27. X. 1501. [Venice], Giovanni Battista Sessa, 27. X. 1501. 4to. 32 pp. With printer's woodcut device on the title page and different device under the colophon; several woodcut initials. Followed by a 49-page manuscript index (beginning with instructions to the "amice lector" on the verso of the colophon) on 28 blank leaves bound after the printed text. 19th century boards with red morocco spine lettered and decorated in gilt.

EUR 14,500.00

The first edition of the 16th century: a very rare reprint of the incunable published in 1494, the first separate edition to be based on the criticism of the Renaissance scholar Ermolao Barbaro. Dedicated to Pope Alexander VI. Mela's description of the ancient world, based on good sources and written during the reign of Emperor Claudius, is the oldest Roman geography to have survived. This edition was not equipped with an index, but a contemporary humanistic owner rectified the fault by crafting his own: the humanistic "cancelaresca" manuscript provides a list of all cities, places and even subjects mentioned, a total of some 1,000 references to 227 paragraph numbers (which the owner, too, provided in brown ink throughout the inner margins of the book). - Occasional slight foxing and waterstaining to margins near end, but a fine copy of this rare book.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 58712. Schweiger II.2, 606. Ebert 13608. Graesse V, 401: "Reimpr. rare de l'edition ... de 1494". Not in Adams, BM-STC Italian, or Riccardi. Not in Brunet or Dibdin.

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Number theory
5

(Lefèvre d'Étaples, Jacques). In hoc libro contenta epitome compendiosaq[ue] introductio in... libris arithmeticos divi Severini Boetii [...]. (Paris, Henricus Stephanus, 15 March 1510). (Paris, Henricus Stephanus, 15 March 1510). Small folio (205 x 285 mm). XLVIII pp. With wide woodcut title border and full-page woodcut (scribe) on verso of final leaf. (Bound with) II: (The same). In hoc opere contenta arithmetica decem libris demonstrata. Musica libris demonstrata quatuor. Epitome in libros arithmeticos divi Severini Boetii. Rithmimachie ludus qui et pugna numerorum appellantur. Paris, Henricus Stephanus, (7 Sept. 1514). (72) ff. With wide woodcut title border. Contemporary blindstamped brown calf.

EUR 25,000.00

Fine sammelband of two works edited by the leading French humanist. Lefèvre (1455-1536), a native of Étaples near Amiens and also known as Faber Stapulensis, had studied in Italy before teaching philosophy and theology in Paris, also publishing on matematical subjects. - I: An early edition of this work, mainly concerned with artimetic and based on Lefèvre's studies of the works of Boethius. Another edition, radically abridged and without the commentary, is included as the third part of the following collection. - II: Second edition of this combination of works. "The greater part of this volume is devoted to the ten books on arithmetic by Jordanus Nemorarius, [the greatest mathematician of his time save Leonardo Fibonacci of Pisa], with the commentary of Jacobus Faber Stapulensis. The work of Jordanus is similar to that of Boethius, and is concerned only with theory of numbers. In particular, the Greek theory of ratios, as elaborated in the Middle Ages, is extensively treated. The second part consists of the work of Jacobus Faber Stapulensis on music, in four books. The third part is the Epitome of the Arithmetic of Boethius [...] The fourth part, consisting of four and a half pages, is a description of the arithmetical game of Rithmimachia, possibly by Shirewode (John Sirwood, Bishop of Durham, who died in 1494), but usually ascribed to Faber Stapulensis" (Smith, 62f.). "Books of this character, evidently intended as the bases of lectures to university students, show in what a hopeless state the Boethian arithmetic found itself at the end of the Middle Ages" (ibid., 82). - Both works feature a very wide title woodcut. Binding rubbed; extremeties bumped. Slight staining throughout. Extremely rare: neither work is recorded in the trade or at auctions of the last decades.
¶ I: Adams F 19. Cf. RISM B VI, 1, p. 492 (1511 ed.). - II: Adams J 324. BM-STC French 246. RISM B VI, 1, p. 492. Smith, Rara Arithmetica, 65. Cf. Smith, History of Mathematics I, p. 307.

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A medical manual drawing on Avicenna
6

Concoregio, Giovanni. Practica nova medicine [...]. Summula [...] de curis febrium. (Venice, heirs of Ottaviano Scoto, 19 Febr. 1515). (Venice, heirs of Ottaviano Scoto, 19 Febr. 1515). Folio (218 x 304 mm). 101 ff., final blank. With woodcut printer's device at the end and numerous woodcut initials. Modern red morocco, blindstamped to style, with gilt spine and inner dentelle. Marbled endpapers. All edges sprinkled in red. In cloth slipcase.

EUR 8,500.00

A rare medical compendium drawing strongly on the Arabic physicians who dominated the medieval medical schools of France and Northern Italy, including the author's treatise on fevers (fol. 68 ff.), based on Avicenna, who is variously quoted. Some of the surprisingly modern ailments discussed include tinnitus (fol. 40), diabetes (fol. 61), and manic depression (an extensive chapter, fol. 13-16). This is the third edition of the collection first published thus in 1501 (not counting the only incunabular edition of 1485). "Concoreggio, born in Milan around 1380, was made professor in Bologna in 1404 before teaching at the Universities of Pavia, Florence and (in 1439) Milan. His works are composed after the model of the Arabs, without much personal observation, and were published as a collection after his death in Pavia around the year 1440" (cf. Hirsch). - Some waterstaining to margins (more pronounced near beginning). Bound in a sumptuous modern morocco binding decorated with rollstamps showing Renaissance heads, likely for the 20th-century physician and collector Piergiorgio Borio (his bookplate on the front pastedown). Only 3 copies in Italy (Biblioteca comunale dell'Archiginnasio Bologna; Biblioteca Angelica Roma; Biblioteca Casanatense Roma).
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 14741. Durling 1008. Hirsch VI, 645. Sangiorgio, Cenni storici sulle due Università di Pavia e di Milano (1831), p. 57f. Brambilla I, 128. Astruc 211.

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A contemporary portrait of Suleiman
7

Hopfer, Hieronymus. Sultan Soliman. Suleyman ain Kaiser der Tirckei. [Augsburg, ca. 1530]. [Augsburg, ca. 1530]. Portrait etched in iron. 152 × 217 mm. Mounted on backing paper.

EUR 2,500.00

Bust-length etched portrait of Suleiman the Magnificent, shown in profile to right. Signed in the plate at centre left: "I.H.", Arabic lettering at centre right. Lettered in lower margin: "Umb unser und unserer vetter sind [...] Es wirt eylentz kumen der zersterer über euch, Hieremie VI". Suleiman, the tenth and longest-reigning sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1520 to his death in 1566, was a prominent monarch of 16th century Europe, presiding over the apex of the Ottoman Empire's economic, military and political power. He annexed much of the Middle East in his conflict with the Safavids and large areas of North Africa as far west as Algeria. Under his rule, the Ottoman fleet dominated the seas from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea and through the Arabian Gulf. - Minute glue traces at upper left, but a fine print.
¶ Hollstein 62 I (of II). Bartsch VIII.520.57.

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d'une rareté excessive
8

Heyden, Sebald. Musicae, id est, artis canendi libri duo. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. 4to. (8), 115, (1) pp. With armorial title woodcut, several initials and numerous music notes in the text. Contemporary limp vellum with manuscript spine title. Wants ties.

EUR 35,000.00

Extremely rare first edition of one of the most important of all classic works of musical theory, a book that enjoyed a high reputation even during the author's lifetime. In contrast to his first treatise, the 1532 "Musicae stoicheiosis" which treats exclusively "musica figurata", or polyphony, his present, second work is more comprehensive and more clearly written, though limited "to matters concerning musical compositions withount discussion of purely theoretical matters. This publication was outstanding for its many examples, drawn, according to the author's prefatory statement, from the works of the best and most renowned composers - Josquin, Obrecht, La Rue, Isaac, Brumel, Ghiselin - not only as the most useful examples but also as demonstrations of great music. The examples are presented mostly without texts or with incipits only" (New Grove). "Heyden s'est fait particulièrement connaître d'une manière avantageuse par un livre [...] ce livre est précieux pour l'histoire de l'art et de la science au seizieme siècle. Dans aucun livre de ce temps, les principes des nuances et de la notation ne sont exposés avec autant de clarté et de concision que dans celui-ci. Les nombreux exemples de Josquin, d'Obrecht, de Senfel, de Henri Isaac, de Ghiselin et d'autres, qui s'y trouvent, avec les résolutions de cas embarassants de l'ancien système de proportions, ajoutent encore au prix de cet ouvrage, qui est malheureusement d'une rareté excessive" (Fétis). All of Petreius's "printed music is of exquisite beauty [...] The printer's glory days began in 1537, with Heyden's highly respected work about choral music" (Cohen, Nürnberger Musikdrucker im 16. Jh., p. 25f.). - Occasional insignificant waterstaining to margins, but altogether a splendidly crisp, wide-margined copy with contemporary handwritten ownership of one "Anastasius de Verona" (erased) on the title page. Of the utmost rarity: a single copy in auction records of the past decades (1968, Hauswedell 158, no. 1246), and a single copy of the 1540 second edition (1942: Schab, cat. 5, no. 113; which is also the only edition kept at Cambridge).
¶ BM-STC German 404. Eitner V, 137. RISM (Écrits impr.) 412. Hirsch I, 246. Wolffheim I, 705. Teramoto (Petreius) passim. New Grove VIII, 28.

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The introduction of "musica poetica", annotated throughout by a German humanist
9

Listenius, Nicolaus. Musica [...], ab authore denuo recognita, multisq[ue] novis... regulis & exemplis adaucta. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1541. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1541. 8vo. (86) pp. With woodcut coat of arms (coloured in red and blue) on the title page; several initials and numerous musical notes in the text. Contemporary vellum.

EUR 7,500.00

Early edition of one of the principal treatises of musical instruction produced in the 16th century, containing a wealth of pioneering theories and practical examples; first published in this form in 1537. It also boasts the first consistently executed example of a canon (still called "fuga"), with references to compositions by Josquin and Walther. - Based on the works of Rhaw and Agricola, Listenius's treatise avails itself of Melanchthon's new educational methods and "became very popular as a school primer in Germany and Austria, and had appeared in more than 40 editions before 1583. The treatise was primarily for teaching singing, and is arranged in a novel manner. Each subject is treated in a series of short, simple rules copiously illustrated with music examples. In the section on mensural music Listenius used the canon [...] for his examples. For the first time, in addition to the traditional terms 'musica theoretica' and 'musica practica', he introduced the term 'musica poetica', by which he meant instruction in composition. The term remained in general use in Germany for over a century" (K. W. Niemöller, New Grove XI, 28). - Contemporary handwritten ownership of "Joannes Thenn S." in a humanist hand on the title page (no relationship could be traced to the Franconian Johann Thenn who had become master of the Salzburg mint in 1500); numerous Latin underlinings and marginalia by the same writer in red and brown ink throughout (covering some 30 pages). Latterly in the library of the French musical scholar Henry Prunières (1861-1942), who in 1920 founded "La Revue Musicale", with his etched bookplate to pastedown.
¶ VD 16, L 2026. Eitner VI, 190. RISM (Écrits impr.) 507. Cf. Hirsch I, 322 (1549 ed.); Wolffheim I, 777 (1550 ed.); also Adams and BM-STC German cite only later editions.

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Avicenna on fevers
10

[Avicenna (Ibn Sina)]. Arcolani, Giovanni. De febribus [...] in Avic[ennae] quarti canonis fen... primam. Dilucida atque optima expositio [...]. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1560. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1560. Folio (227 x 317 mm). (18), 191 ff. (without final blank). Printer's device on title page and, in a different version, on the last page. Contemporary vellum. Traces of ties.

EUR 15,000.00

First issue under this title, previously released as "Expositio in primam fen quarti canonis Avenicennae" (1506). A commentary (with the text, in the version of Gerardus Cremonensis) of book four, part (fen) one of Avicenna's systematic "Canon of Medicine", written in Arabic but widely translated throughout the Middle Ages and the basis of medical training in the West as late as the mid-17th century. It continues in use to this day in parts of the Arab world. Through this encyclopedic work, the author exerted "perhaps a wider influence in the eastern and western hemispheres than any other Islamic thinker" (PMM). "The 'Qanun' [...] contains some of the most illuminating thoughts pertaining to distinction of mediastinitis from pleurisy; contagious nature of phthisis; distribution of diseases by water and soil; careful description of skin troubles; of sexual diseases and perversions; of nervous ailments" (Sarton, Introduction to the History of Science). The present part is dedicated to a discussion of feverish illnesses. - 17th century ownership "Bernardinus Statius Phys." on flyleaf. Some brownstaining throughout, as common; some worming to spine. Still a good copy.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 2345. Adams A 1541. Durling 245. Cf. Wellcome I, 387 (only the Venice reprint). PMM 11.

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Mediaeval Europe's authoritative introduction to astrology
11

Al-Qabisi, Abu Al Saqr 'Abd Al-'Aziz Ibn 'Uthman Ibn 'Ali [Alchabitius]) / Naibod, Valentin (ed. & comm.). [Libellus Isagogicus - Al-madkhal]. Enarratio elementorum astrologiae, in... qua praeter Alcabicii, qui Arabum doctrinum compendium prodidit [...]. Cologne, Arnold Birckmanns heirs, 1560. Cologne, Arnold Birckmanns heirs, 1560. 4to. (32), "171" (recte: 471), (1) pp. With printer's woodcut device to title page, two initials and 19 woodcut diagrams in the text. Slightly later vellum.

EUR 9,500.00

First edition of this important commentary on al-Qabisi's most influential work, "al-Madkhal" (the text of which is included in the Latin translation of Joannes Hispalensis prepared in 1144): an introductory exposition of some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy, the astrological science of casting nativities, or divination as to the destinies of newborns. The author, known as "Alchabitus" in the Latin tradition, flourished in Aleppo, Syria, in the middle of the 10th century. "Although al-Qabisi's education was primarily in geometry and astronomy, his principal surviving treatise, 'Al-madkhal ila sina'at ahkam al-nujum' ('Introduction into the Art of Astrology') in five sections [...], is on astrology. The book, as the title indicates, is an introductory exposition of some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy; its present usefulness lies primarily in its quotations from the Sassanian Andarzghar literature and from al-Kindi, the Indians, Ptolemy, Dorotheus of Sidon, Masha'allah, Hermes Trismegistus, and Valens. Although completely lacking in originality, it was highly valued as a textbook" (DSB). "Together with the writings of Abu Ma'shar and Sacrobosco's 'Sphaera mundi', 'al-Madkhal' became Europe's authoritative introduction to astrology between the 13th and the 16th century [...] In 1560 the commentary of Naibod (also known as Nabod or Naiboda) appeared in Cologne. This professor of mathematics had previously published the first book of Euclid's 'Elementa' and his own treatise on arithmetics. For his commentary he relies mainly on Ptolemy, Bonatti and Regiomontanus. Its wide circulation bears evidence to the vivid interest which al-Qabisi's astrology engendered as late as the early 17th century A.D." (cf. Arnzen, p. 96 & 106f.). Naibod (1523-93) taught at the universites of Cologen and Erfurt, adhering to the Ptolemaic principles. His commentary on al-Qabisi was banned by the Catholic church. Naibod is said to have discovered a new method to prognosticate a man's fate, but was unable to avert his own murder in spite of his having presaged it (cf. Jöcher III, 806). - Slightly browned but a good copy. Provenance: 1) Contemporary handwritten ownership "Joannis Roberti Aurelii" on the title page, probably by Jean Robert of Orléans who in 1557 published "Sententiarum juris libri quatuor". 2) Later in the famous collection of the Polish theologian Józef Andrzej Zaluski (1702-74), with his stamp on the title page. With his brother, Zaluski founded the Bibliotheca Zalusciana, the first Polish public library, dispersed in 1795. 3) The book was subsequently acquired by the Warsaw industrialist Jan Henryk Geysmer (1780-1835) (his stamp on the foot of the title). 4) Bookplate of the composer Robert Curt von Gorrissen (1887-1978) on front pastedown.
¶ VD 16, N 14. Adams N 3. BM-STC German 642 Houzeau/Lancaster 4882. Zinner 2239. Thorndike VI, 119f. BNHCat N 2. Grassi p. 483. Dewhirst I.1, 781. Hamel II, 187f. Cantamessa 5437. DSB XI, 226. R. Arnzen, "Vergessene Pflichtlektüre: Al-Qabisis astrologische Lehrschrift im europäischen Mittelalter", in: Zft. für Geschichte der arab.-islam. Wiss. 13 (2000), pp. 93-128, at p. 112 no. 6. Cf. M. H. Fikri, Treasures from The Arab Scientific Legacy in Europe (Qatar 2009), nos. 9f.

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How to train a falcon
12

Carcano, Francesco Sforzino da. Tre libri de gli uccelli da rapina. Ne... quali si contiene la vera cognitione dell’ arte de stroccieri, & il modo di conoscere, ammaestrare reggere and medicare tutti gli augelli rapaci. Con un trattato de cani del medesimo. Venice, Gabriel Giolito de' Ferrari, 1568. Venice, Gabriel Giolito de' Ferrari, 1568. 8vo. (16), 249, (3) pp., 1 final blank leaf. With a full-page woodcut in the text (illustration of hawking instruments), woodcut initials and ornaments, printer's device on title page and different, larger device at the end. Contemporary vellum (spine professionally repaired).

EUR 6,500.00

First edition - the edition of 1547 mentioned by Harting and Souhart does not seem to exist - of the best-known and most authoritative of 16th century Italian books on falconry, the breeding and training of falcons, their ailments, etc. "Carcano states in his Preface that this treatise is the result of forty years' experience as a falconer, and the perusal of all the Italian and French books he could find relating to Falconry [...] The author's reputation as a falconer caused this book to become very popular, and it not only passed through several editions [...], but was extensively copied by subsequent writers, as, for example, Raimondi and Turberville" (Harting, p. 142f.). "An interesting treatise on falcons and sporting dogs, with remedies for their diseases" (Schwerdt). The full-page woodcuts shows a set of veterinary instruments for use by the falconer. - Occasional slight brownstaining; a minute paper flaw to margin of fol. P3 (barely touching text). Lacks 2 leaves of dedication in the preliminaries, not bound with all copies, and the second of the two final blanks, otherwise a fine copy.
¶ Harting 267 (p. 141). Adams C 644. BM-STC Italian 148. IA 132.009. Bongi II, 271. Souhart 86. Ceresoli 132. Schwerdt I, 94.

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The most complete treatise on the art theory, design, and iconography of the Mannerist period
13

Lomazzo, Giovanni Paolo. Trattato dell'arte de la pittura, di Gio. Paolo... Lomazzo milanese pittore. Diviso in sette libri. Ne' quali si contiene tutta la theorica, & la prattica d'essa pittura. Milano, Paolo Gottardo Da Ponte, 1584. Milano, Paolo Gottardo Da Ponte, 1584. 4to. (40), 700 (but: 698), (2) pp. With armorial title woodcut and half-page woodcut portrait on fol. B1. Contemporary full vellum with marbled edges.

EUR 4,000.00

Second edition, the earliest one obtainable and usually considered the first altogether (a single copy of an edition published by Da Ponte in 1582 has been discovered in the Biblioteca della Collegiata S. Pietro Apostolo in Broni near Pavia). The principal work of the Milan artist and theoretician of art, Giampaolo Lomazzo, has been called "the most complete treatise on the art theory, design, and iconography of the Mannerist period" (Arntzen/R.); indeed, "the true Bible of Mannerism" (cf. Schlosser). Purposefully divided into the mystical number of seven books, Lomazzo's treatise describes first proportions (with a discussion of Dürer, who was much-received in Italy), then the expression of feelings, colours, light and shade, linear perspective, and practical painting; the seventh and final book treats matter and substances, touching upon - and greatly expanding on - Armenini. "These last two chapters are of the greatest importance for understanding the essence of Mannerism, providing quite simply one of the most extensive accounts" (ibid.). - Some occasional browning and waterstaining near beginning; slight paper flaw to fol. E3 (not affecting legibility). Numerous errors in pagination; quire Y jumbled but complete. A small perforation to the spine; textblock curled. Old ownership on front flyleaf obliterated in ink. A single copy in German auction records.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 24452 (Var. A). Adams L 1419. BM-STC Italian 391. Cicognara 159. Schlosser 352 Arntzen/Rainwater H 43. Kat. der Ornamentstichslg. Berlin 4612. Chamberlin 2015. Bibl. Trivulziana 261. Cf. Haym, Libri rari 265; Fowler 185 (1585 ed.).

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The Theatre of Devils
14

(Feyerabend, Sigmund [ed.]). Theatrum Diabolorum, das ist: Warhaffte eigentliche und kurtze... Beschreibung, allerley grewlicher, schrecklicher und abschewlicher Laster [...]. Frankfurt, Peter Schmid (for Sigmund Feyerabend), 1587-(1588). Frankfurt, Peter Schmid (for Sigmund Feyerabend), 1587-(1588). Folio (250 x 363 mm). 2 parts in 1 volume. (5), 1 blank, 302, (7) ff., final blank. (5), 1 blank, 380, (7) ff., final blank. With 2 different woodcut title vignettes and the publisher's woodcut device on the final page. Contemporary blindstamped pigskin over wooden boards with bevelled edges, on five raised double bands, twith two clasps. All edges red.

EUR 5,000.00

Third and final edition of Sigmund Feyerabend's potboiling compilation of the "devil literature" which flourished in the second half of the Faustian 16th century. "One of the most valuable books for the cultural history of its age" (cf. Hayn/G.). First printed in 1569, Feyerabend's two massive volumes - blatantly entitled "The Theatre of Devils" - aimed to unite all previously published pertinent works. "The clever bookseller had not misjudged his market: the venture proved a happy speculation, and only six years later he went about producing a second edition, which was to include four additional works [...]. The 'Theatrum Diabolorum' appeared for the third and last time in 1587, still printed by Schmidt's press, now including 'ten new' diabolical chapters. By a hardly credible mistake, the 'Melancholic Devil' by Simon Musaeus was included twice in the same volume (fols. 129-136 and 374-380 in part 2) [...]. Naturally, this final two-volume edition was the best-known and the most frequently quoted one in the 17th and 18th centuries, which were still somewhat in touch with the Devil's Literature of the Age of Reformation" (cf. Osborn, p. 38f.). - Binding rubbed and bumped with noticeable worming; some worming to interior; some waterstaining and occasional fingerstaining. Corner of fol. 219 (Oo3) in part 1 remargined with slight loss to text on both sides. Old ownership on title page obliterated in ink by a 17th century owner. Early 19th century duplicate stamp of a German library on the title. Stamp of the Leipzig rare book dealer and auction house Oswald Weigel on pastedown, along with the small bookplate of the Swedish collector Anders Persson of Västeras.
¶ VD 16, F 906. Ebert 22706. Coumont, Witchcraft F28.3. Hayn/G. VII, 617. Grimm, Die Deutschen "Teufelbücher", p. 1751. Osborn, Die Teufellitteratur des XVI. Jahrhunderts, p. 38. Not in Adams or BM-STC German. Cf. Rosenthal 2359.

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Editio princeps of the Gospels in Arabic (Darlow/M.)
15

[Biblia arabica - NT]. Evangelium Sanctum Domini nostri Iesu Christi conscriptum a... quatuor Evangelistis sanctis, id est Matthaeo, Marco, Luca et Iohanne. Rome, typographia Medicea, 1590(-1591). Rome, typographia Medicea, 1590(-1591). Folio. 368 pp. With 149 large woodcuts. Early 19th century auburn morocco with gilt spine, ornamental gilt borders and blindstamped cover ornaments. Marbled endpapers.

EUR 28,000.00

Rare first edition of the Gospels in Arabic; the first work to be issued from the Medicean Press, directed by G. B. Raimondi. Printed in Granjon's famous large fount, generally considered the first satisfactory Arabic printing type and appears here for the first time. Apart from the Latin title and colophon, the book is in Arabic throughout. Also in 1591 an Arabic-Latin edition was issued, more common than the present one and reprinted in 1619 and 1774. Illustrated with 149 large woodcuts from 67 blocks by Leonardo Parasole after Antonio Tempesta. - Some various browning throughout as common; slight waterstaining near end. Old ownership stamps of the "Collegium Missionum Nigritiae" on title page; includes photocopy of ownership transferral by the Biblioteca Seminario Vescovile of Verona. An uncommonly appealingly bound example. The Hauck copy fetched $75,000 at Sotheby's in 2006.
¶ Adams B 1822. Mortimer 64. Darlow/Moule 1636. Fück 54. Schnurrer 318. Smitskamp 374.

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Interleaved and with a contemporary linguist's annotations throughout: a unique volume documenting an obscure triangle of western oriental scholars and their reception of Arabic
16

Megiser, Hieronymus. Institutionum linguae Turcicae, libri quatuor [...]. (Leipzig [and Breslau, Kirstenius] sumptibus authoris), 1612. (Leipzig [and Breslau, Kirstenius] sumptibus authoris), 1612. 8vo. 4 parts in one volume. (8), (30 [instead of 28!] incl. final blank, with extra dedication to Hector von Ernau), (52 incl. final blank), (24 incl. final blank), (58) ff., interleaved and with generous stretches of blanks between individual parts; annotated and foliated 1-421 throughout by the annotator. Title page printed in red and black. Megiser's full-page coat of arms at the end of the Turkish-Latin dictionary. Contemporary vellum binding using a 15th century Biblical manuscript leaf (Daniel 13, "Susannah and the Elders"), with handwritten title to spine. Two Arabic inscriptions to upper cover (one reading "Law kana Allah ma'na, man yakunu 'alaina" - translated from Romans 8:31, "If God be with us, who can be against us?").

EUR 58,000.00

First edition of "the first full-fledged Turkish grammar to be published in Europe" (Smitskamp), "a landmark in Turkish studies" (Navari), one of the most important works produced by the versatile scholar Megiser (1554-1619) from Stuttgart. This copy contains not only the rare additional printed dedication to the Carinthian nobleman Hector von Ernau, but also the extensive handwritten notes of the contemporary Arabist Johann Melchior Mader. In fact, this unique volume constitutes the fullest document extant about an only vaguely known and unresearched triangle of early 17th century enthusiasts of Arabic: Megiser, Ernau, and Mader, only the first of whom achieved fame. - The most obvious asset of the present copy lies in Mader's generous scholarly annotations both in the text as well as on the interleaved pages which expand the book, usually encompassing a mere 167 leaves, to two and a half times its normal size. While the additions in the interleaving are mostly light, those on the blanks inserted between the individual parts are often quite extensive. Part one (concerned with the Arabic alphabet and spelling, printed by the physician and orientalist Kirsten in Breslau and the only part to contain letterpress Arabic) is followed by 5½ densely handwritten pages of "Sententiae et proverbia Arabica", with 63 numbered sayings (both in Arabic script as well as in transliteration and Latin - and occasionally German - translation). Part two discusses grammar proper; part three contains specimen Turkish versions of the Lord's Prayer, the Apostles' Creed, the Decalogue, and Psalm 51, as well as two centuries of Turkish proverbs transliterated in Roman italics (including Latin, Italian, and German translations). Here, Mader has in several cases provided the Turkish in carefully pointed Ottoman script, and has sometimes corrected the printed text. In the blanks following this section, Mader has added a little over 26 closely written pages of "Proverbia et Sententiae Turcica" (he stops numbering them at 179, with a good ten pages to go). The fourth and final part offers a Latin-Turkish as well as a Turkish-Latin dictionary; this latter section in particular is replete with Mader's handwritten additions, which expand the printed word list by a generous third. At the end are another three pages of handwritten "Proverbia et Sententiae Persicae", underlining Mader's specific interest in paroemiography - a focus shared by many scholars of the time, including Erpenius. The study of proverbs was thought to offer a window into the culture and mentality behind a language, and the literally hundreds of additional examples here given by Mader not only significantly expand the known corpus of oriental adages, but with their transliterations also tell us more about the pronunciation of early 17th century Turkish. - The other merit of this volume lies in Mader's notes about the editorial genesis and authorship of Megiser's work. At the end of the extra dedication to Ernau (two printed leaves in which Megiser calls Ernau "autor", inserted between A1 and A2 and not present in any other known copy), Mader asserts that Ernau is indeed the real author of this Introduction to Turkish. Megiser, writes Mader, inserted the extra dedication only in the presentation copies he sent to Ernau but deliberately omitted them from the general press run, so as that he himself might appear the author: "The lord of Ernau wrote and disposed the work during his stay at Constantinople, and Megiser published it as its author, though it was not so". In reinforcement of this statement, Mader has stricken out the word "Authore" referring to Megiser on the title page and corrected this to "Descriptore". - Mader's handwritten ownership of this volume ("Joannes Melchior Maderus e Quabilinis", with an Arabic inscription and quotes from Ovid) is on the front pastedown, dated 1620. Remarkably, Mader made a similar claim in print at almost the same time. In 1621 he published at Nuremberg, under a false imprint, an obscure 64-page book on horses and riding ("Equestria sive de arte equitandi") best remembered for providing a definition of a horse that would have satisfied Mr. Gradgrind: "A horse is a non-rational animal that whinnies" (E2r). More than half of this vanity production is taken up with dedications to Mader's noble Carinthian friends, and in this introduction he mentions not only Hector von Ernau and his labour undertaken while at the Ottoman court, but also how Megiser (somewhat unfairly called "ignorant of the Turkish language") appropriated his work and published it eight years previously. Strikingly, he goes on to discuss the very annotated copy here under consideration: "but we shall revise that book, and put it forth with other Turkish, Persian, and Arabic daintinesses, as well as with brief corrections" (D2v). Unfortunately, this planned revision, the draft of which has here survived, did not materialize. Far too little is known about Mader: ironically, although in the "Equestria" he signs his name as a "doctor of philosophy", that pamphlet cast him as a veterinarian in bibliographic history, and as such he is cited by Jöcher and Schrader (where it is also stated in error that he hailed "from Carniola"). In fact, Mader even then had two Arabist publications to his name: in 1617 he produced not only a ten-page "Grammatica Arabica", but also a long "Oratio pro lingua Arabica" (both printed by David Franck in Augsburg). While the former includes among the dedicatees Johann Ulrich von Ernau (curiously disguised as "Ioan. Ulricus Österreicherus"), the latter contains a long list enumerating the "illustres & clarissimi eruditione viri" to whose work in Arabic he is indebted, among them not only "Petrus Kirstenius M.D., amicus meus singularis", but also "Hieronymus Megiserus, polyglottus ille Archiducum Austriae"! - Mader was born in in Waiblingen near Stuttgart, likely the early 1590s; he matriculated at Tübingen in 1611, took a Master's degree in 1613 and left the university two years later (cf. Hermelink II, p. 65). His years as a travelling scholar from 1615 to 1620, which took him as far as Prague, Leipzig, Weimar, Leiden, Paris, Louvain, Basel, Strasbourg, Augsburg, Linz, Vienna, Seisenberg in Carniola, and Padua, can be traced in his friendship album (Frommann collection, Württembergische Landesbibliothek Stuttgart, StB-Nr. 138), which includes entries by Andreas Osiander the Younger, Thomas Erpenius, Gabriel Sionita, Johannes Hesronita, and Johann Buxtorf, as well as by many dedicatees of his works. His numerous friendships among Carinthian and Carniolan noblemen can best be explained by reference to his fellow Württembergian Megiser, who signed the album in Linz on June 14, 1618, while serving as historiographer to the Upper Austrian estates: the scholar sported a theory that the Dukes of Carinthia were descended from the Counts of Waiblingen, Mader's native town (cf. his Annales Carinthiae [1612], p. 12, likewise mainly the work of a different, uncredited writer), and so it was probably Megiser (whom Mader would soon come to view so critically) who first suggested that Carinthia was the place whence a full-blooded Swabian ought to turn. Mader's later fate is uncertain, but it is likely he died soon after producing the "Equestria", in the early years of the Thirty Years' War that claimed so many lives by famine and disease. - Hector von Ernau, born the son of the Carinthian mint-master in 1562, went on to serve his native country in high offices; he died in Basel in 1649 without having achieved notoriety as a linguist. His soujourn in Constantinople, likely as the member of an embassy, and the extent of his studies in oriental languages, so highly praised by Mader, must remain the subject of further investigation. - Provenance: 1) Mader; 2) 18th century ownership "L. V. Pantaleon" on title page; 3) ownership of Francis Watts, Geneva 1823, on flyleaf; 4) Sefik E. Atabey (his bookplate on the pastedown). In fine condition throughout.
¶ VD 17, 12:152965L. Zenker I, 295. Smitskamp, PO 346. STC M 631 (wanting pt. 4). Silvestre de Sacy 2513. Cat. Bernstein 2131. Atabey 797 (this copy). Not in Blackmer.

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One of the earliest printed sources for the early history of Fujairah and Sharjah
17

Valle, Pietro della. Viaggi di Pietro della Valle il pellegrino. Venice, Paolo Baglioni, 1661-1664. Venice, Paolo Baglioni, 1661-1664. 12mo. 4 vols. (40), 670 pp. (2) ff. (1 blank), 734, (34) pp., (2) ff. (1 blank), 792, (18) pp. 756, (24) pp. Contemp. limp vellum with ms. spine titles; all edges of vol. 2 sprinkled in red.

EUR 18,500.00

Early duodecimo reprint edition of Della Valle's complete "Viaggi", published while the first complete edition was still under the press. Della Valle's account is highly sought after as one of the earliest printed sources for the early history of Dibba, the coastal region at the northeastern tip of the United Arab Emirates, today ruled by the Emirates of Fujairah and of Sharjah. - Pietro della Valle (1586-1652) left Venice in 1614 on a pilgrimage to Palestine, proceeding to Baghdad and then into Persia, where he married and sojourned in the court of Shah Abbas. While staying with the Sultan of Bandar Abbas, he "met the son of the ruler of Dibba who was visiting. From this he learned that Dibba had formerly been subject to the kingdom of Hormuz, but was at that time loyal to the Safavids who in 1623 sent troops to Dibba, Khor Fakkan and other ports on the southeast coast of Arabia in order to prepare for a Portuguese counter-attack following their expulsion from Hormuz (Jarun). In fact, the Portuguese under Ruy Freire were so successful that the people of Dibba turned on their Safavid overlords, putting them all to death, whereupon a Portuguese garrison of 50 men was installed at Dibba. More Portuguese forces, however, had to be sent to Dibba in 1627 as a result of an Arab revolt. Curiously, two years later the Portuguese proposed moving part of the Mandaean population of southern Iraq, under pressure from neighbouring Arab tribes, to Dibba" (UAE History: 2000 to 200 years ago - UAEinteract, online). "Della Valle displayed excellent narrative and descriptive skills, powers of acute observation, and a genuinely scholarly breadth of learning. He refused to comment on what he had not witnessed himself or checked against the best authorities" (Gurney). He continued his travels east to the coast of India, Goa and Muscat, and thence back to Aleppo by way of Basra. He reached Rome in 1626, where the original Italian text of his letters written to the Neapolitan physician Mario Schipano was published. Only the first volume, dealing with Turkey, saw print during his lifetime. The two-part volume II on Persia was released in 1658, four years after his death; in 1662 the Turkey volume saw a second edition, and the set was concluded in 1663 with the volume on India. A single-volume English translation of the Indian travels appeared in 1665. - Occasional slight brownstaining, otherwise fine.
¶ Röhricht 947, p. 238. Tobler 95. Weber II, 251. British Library STC II, 931. Cf. Graesse VII, 251. Atabey 1271 (1667 Baglioni ed., 3 vols. only). Blackmer 1712 (mixed French ed.). Macro 2233. Gurney, "Della Valle, Pietro", in: Encyclopaedia Iranica (online ed.).

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An English merchant as a slave in Muslim North Africa
18

[Allais, Denis Vairasse d' / Skinner, Thomas]. Geographisches Kleinod, aus zweyen sehr ungemeinen Edelgesteinen bestehend [...]. [Sultzbach], Abraham Lichtenthaler, 1689. [Sultzbach], Abraham Lichtenthaler, 1689. 4to. (2), 362 pp. (but: 360 pp.; p. 176f. omitted); 100 pp. (complete). With engraved frontispiece (margins trimmed) and 16 engraved plates. Contemporary full vellum with ms. spine title. Leaves Bb2-4 and Cc1-2 supplied from another copy.

EUR 8,500.00

The first German edition of Vairasse's "Histoire des Sevarambes" ("History of the Sevarambians"), translated from the French 1677-79 edition. This is an account of an imaginary journey to Australia, a utopian history in the style of Thomas Moore. Presented in the manner of the then-current geographical and anthropological works, the book provides a direct criticism of revealed and imposed religions, in particular of 17th century Catholicism. Remarkably, this edition also includes the first German publication of Thomas Skinner's slavery narrative entitled "The adventures of an English merchant, taken prisoner by the Turks of Algiers, and carried into the inland countries of Africa" ("Die Selsamen Begebenheiten Herrn T. S. Eines Englischen Kauff-Herrens, Welcher von den Algierischen See-Räubern zum Sclaven gemacht, und in das inwendige Land von Africa geführet worden"). - Lower margin of title torn with some loss, final two leaves torn and frayed without loss of text. Minor foxing to the plates; binding worn, edges somewhat defective. From the library of Swedish antiquarian bookdealer Björn Löwendahl (1941-2013).
¶ VD 17, 39:131551R. Holzmann/Bohatta II, 12150.

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Foreshadowing Computers
19

Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm. Ars combinatoria [...]. Frankfurt, Heinrich Christoph Cröcker, 1690. Frankfurt, Heinrich Christoph Cröcker, 1690. 4to. (3), 78 pp. With an engraved plate bound as a frontispiece. Contemporary marbled boards.

EUR 35,000.00

Second edition of Leibniz's groundbreaking work on combinatorics. It was first published in 1666 as "Dissertatio de arte combinatoria", expanded from the author's thesis "Disputatio arithmetica de complexionibus", with which he earned the venia legendi. This unauthorized re-release, produced 24 years later, caused Leibniz to respond with corrections in the Acta Eruditorum of 1691. Both editions are extremely rare; NUC lists no more than two copies of the present one. - This is Leibniz's earliest work in combinatorics, the branch of mathematics concerned with the study of finite or countable discrete structures. It thus constitutes an early and important contribution to the scientific foundations of modern computer engineering. "In this treatise, Leibniz undertook that part of his grand plan that aimed at achieving a complete set of possible connections of terms, and the mathematical conception of this problem he named 'ars combinatoria' - a name that would stick" (cf. Cantor). This early work of Leibniz is all the more remarkable for the "very modest specialized knowledge that he then possessed [and which] is reflected in the 'Dissertatio de arte combinatoria'" (DSB). - Somewhat browned throughout as common due to paper. Trimmed rather closely, with some professional remarginings at the top edge near the end of the book and repairs to the gutter of the title page (loss of a few letters at the very left, some unobtrusively supplied). A single copy in auction records (1998: Reiss 65, lot 583: 65,000 DM). Apart from the frontispiece, VD 17 cites 33 numbered plates - in apparent error, for no known copy contains more than this single plate.
¶ VD 17, 12:194409W. Poggendorff I, 1413. DSB VIII, 153 & 160. Cantor III, 43-45. NDB XIV, 122. Cf. Ravier 6.

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Tunes for Queen Anne
20

Lenton, John, composer (1657-1719). Instrumentall Musick Performed before his Maj.ty on New... years day 1702. Composed by John Lenton Composer to his Maj.ty. [London, 1702]. [London, 1702]. Oblong 8vo. Musical manuscript in English, on paper written in a single cursive hand in brown ink, four staves to a page. 12 leaves: blank, title, dedication, 10 pp. of music on 6 leaves, 3 blanks. Dedication to Princess Anne on second recto. In a contemporary morocco binding, exuberantly tooled and gilt by Robert Steel, arguably the finest binder in England at the time; board edges gilt, marbled endleaves, all edges gilt.

EUR 25,000.00

An exquisite manuscript musical part book, composed and bound for royal presentation on New Years' Day (then celebrated on Lady Day, March 25). Inscribed to Princess Anne of Denmark, soon to be Queen Anne of England. The pieces are labelled "Overture" and "Hornpipe", with one passage indicated "very slow". Signed "J.L." at the end. - The violinist, singer and composer Lenton joined the ensemble of royal musicians, known as the King's Musick, in 1681 under Charles II and played at the coronations of James II and of William and Mary (cf. New Grove X, 665). As violinist, Lenton accompanied William to Holland in 1691 and contributed to the royal musical repertoire. He wrote incidental music for some dozen plays between 1682 and 1705 and accumulated the offices of Gentleman Extraordinary at the Royal Chapel (1685) and Groom of the Vestry (1708). The binder Robert Steel (fl. 1668-1711) apprenticed with Samuel Mearne and took possession of his tools after his death in 1686. In turn, one of Steel's workmen, Thomas Elliott, secured Mearne's tools and became a principal binder for the Harleian Library. - In fine condition: the splendid binding shows a repeated flower-and-foliage tool flanked by rules forming the outer frame; the panels have a pot at the left and the right from which spread vines with fine small leaves; flame-tipped volutes in the corners and around the open strapwork central medallion from which extend rule hearts flanked by dots; daisies and foliage cover the spine.
¶ For the binding cf. Maggs Bros., Bookbinding in the British Isles Catalogue 1075 (1987), no. 118 (the outer frame tool, there called a roll) and Catalogue 1212 (1996), nos. 69 (leaves on the spine) & 70 (frame tool), as well as Foot, The Henry Davis Gift II, no. 148.

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The book that changed Europe
21

Picart, Bernard. The ceremonies and religious customs of the various... nations of the known world. London, William Jackson, 1733-1739. London, William Jackson, 1733-1739. Folio. 7 in 6 vols. All title pages printed in red and black. Numerous engr. head- and tailpieces and initials, and 243 plates. Contemporary calf, spine elaborately gilt with double giltstamped red labels.

EUR 25,000.00

A perfectly preserved tall paper copy of this beautifully illustrated ethnographic work on the world's religions. Despite condemnation by the Catholic church, the publication was a resounding success. "'Ceremonies and customs' prepared the ground for religious toleration amid seemingly unending religious conflict, and demonstrated the impact of the global on Western consciousness [...] as it shaped the development of a modern, secular understanding of religion" (Hunt). Based on the author's "Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde" (Amsterdam, 1723-1743). - Bindings a little rubbed, otherwise an excellent and unusually wide-margined complete copy in uniform bindings with elaborately gilt spines.
¶ Cf. L. Hunt, The Book That Changed Europe: Picart & Bernard's Religious Ceremonies of the World (Harvard UP, 2010).

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In Defence of the Prophet
22

Reflections on Mohammedism, and the conduct of Mohammed. Occasioned... by a late learned translation and exposition of the Koran or Al Koran. London , J. Roberts, 1735. London , J. Roberts, 1735. 8vo. (2), 54 pp. (wanting half title). (Bound with) II: Henley, John. The Lord, He is God: or, The Atheist Tormented, by Sure Prognosticks of Hell Fire [...]. London, J. Roberts, 1730. 29, (1) pp. (Bound with) III: [Lewis, Thomas. The nature of hell, the reality of hell-fire, and the eternity of hell-torments, explain'd and vindicated. London, J. Hooke & T. Bickerton, 1720]. 38 pp., (2 pp. of ads), wanting 4 pp. of prelimns including the title. (Bound with) IV: [Oakes, Abraham]. The doctrine of hell-torments distinctly and impartially discussed. London, J. Noon, 1738. 72 pp. (Bound with) V: [Fludger, John]. The absolute and proper eternity of hell torments fully proved from scripture, from reason, and from the natural attributes of God. London, T. Gardner, 1739. (2), 36 pp. (Bound with) VI: Phileleutherus Dubliniensis [i.e., Patrick Delany]. Reflections upon polygamy, and the encouragement given to that practice in the scriptures of the Old Testament. London, J. Roberts, 1737. (2), 188 pp. (Bound with) VII: [Booth, George, Earl of Warrington]. Considerations upon the institution of marriage. With some thoughts concerning the force and obligation of the matrimonial contract. Wherein is considered, how far divorces may, or ought to be allowed. London, John Whiston, 1739. VI, 154 pp. (Bound with) VIII: [Clarke, Alured]. An essay towards the character of her late majesty Caroline, queen-consort of Great Britain, &c. London, J. & P. Knapton, 1738. (2), 46 pp. (Bound with) IX: [Hildrop, John]. A letter to a member of Parliament, containing a proposal for bringing in a bill to revise, amend or repeal certain obsolete statutes, commonly called the ten commandments. London, R. Minors, 1738. (2), 61, (1) pp. Contemporary full calf, gilt.

EUR 8,500.00

Only edition; rare: an apology of Islam and its Prophet, inflenced by the writings of Pococke and Reland, and published a year after George Sale's "Koran", the first English Quran to be translated directly from the Arabic. The anonymous author counts among those "interested in revising 'imposture' theories by recasting Mahomet in a positive, Greco-Roman republican mold - a wise 'Arabian legislator' [...]. [This work,] occasioned by Sale's translation of the Qur'an, suggests that Islam anticipates the Protestant Reformation: Mahomet 'laid the foundations of a general and thorough Reformation, Conversion, and Re-Union in ages to come' (50)" (H. Garcia, Islam and the English Enlightenment, 1670-1840 [2011], p. 256). From the beginning the author cautions that "no disputes ought to be conducted with more temper and moderation than those about religion, but, unluckily, none have been managed with such warmth, bitterness, and inequality" (p. 1); he defends the Prophet against unjust accusations levelled against him by his Christian detractors and closes with the admonition that young British scholars of theology would do well "to apply themselves, among their other exercises, to the study of the oriental tongues, which, upon an impartial survey of the present state of religion, seems to claim much of their attention" (p. 53f.). - Bound with this are eight other English theological works (all first or only editions) concerned with hell-fire and heresies, several written with a decidedly free-thinking slant. Binding severely rubbed and bumped; hinges cracked. Variously browned throughout with occasional staining; contemporary handwritten table of contents on loose flyleaf; second flyleaf clipped with a handwritten title "A Vol. of scarce & curious Tracts" on verso; first title page has 19th century ownership stamp "R. Blackwell".
¶ ESTC T91614. Chauvin XI, 680 (note).

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Spectacular late 18th-century Italian manuscript on fireworks, illustrated throughout
23

[Fireworks]. Arte Pirotecnia. [Italy, late 18th century]. Large 4to (270 x 195 mm). 36 ff. With 72 very interesting pen-and-ink drawings, partly coloured in brown, yellow and reddish washes. Contemporary marbled boards. In custom-made cloth portfolio.

EUR 27,500.00

Spectacularly illustrated manuscript describing and illustrating many moveable and rotating pyrotechnical units and machines, including rockets. The title-page, bearing the name of a former owner (Valentino Vieri, who probably also added some probationes pennae), is followed by a description of the first 62 coloured drawings, beginning with the "Giuoco della Luna e Sole" (games of moon and sun), including all sorts of revolving, spouting, exploding and firing units, rockets, and other gadgets: On fol. 20r three objects are illuminated: an aloe vase, a tree, and a coat of arms, inscribed "Dini". Fols. 20v-23r show full-page installations, including a "Colona Trionfante" with a winged angel on top, a Lion of St. Mark, the symbol of the free Republic of Venice, holding an open book with his right paw (displaying the text "Pax tibi Marce Evangelista meus"), an oval on top of a balustrade, bearing the text "W. Gesu Giuseppe e Maria", a "Piramicia Egiziana", and a cupola with lanterns and fire pots. Fols. 23v-25r contains two double-page war scenes: the first, a fortified castle by a coast, with a vessel and a galley at sea; the second, a fortified tower and an army camp with tents opposite, with symbols of war and military equipment in the foreground. The final fols. 25v-36v contain indexes and instructions for fireworks: (1) "Indice delli Giuochi di Fuocho" (the various units and rockets; fols. 25v-26v); (2) "Regole Generali": 84 numbered instructions for construction and operation of fireworks (fols. 27r-35r); (3) "Indice delle Misture" (fols. 35v-36r); and "Catalogo de Generi ed Utensili" (fol. 36v). - There may be a connection between this manuscript and the Papal Master of Ceremonies Msgr. Giuseppe Dini (d. 1799). The Library of the Getty Research Centre possesses a ms. written by Dini ("Relazione o sia diario di tutto quelle che e stato osservato in Roma nelle venuta del Re delle due Sicilie Ferdinando IV e la Regina Maria Carolina Arciduchessa d'Austria", 1791) containing biographical and historical notes, including descriptions of the preparations for the royal visit with details about the route, the number of soldiers guarding the visitors, and the costs of the entertainment (including operatic performances and fireworks). At the back of that manuscript are printed announcements of the firework display and official appearances by Pope Pius VI. - In 1782 Dini - as that Pope's Master of Ceremonies - published a diary of the Papal journey, via Venice, to Vienna (undertaken with an aim to mitigate the social and ecclesiastical reforms enacted by Emperor Joseph II). Perhaps the ms. with its explicit references to the Republic of Venice can be connected with this 1782 journey (a German edition, "Vollständiges Tagebuch von der Reise des Pabsts Pius VI. nach Wien", appeared in Breslau in 1783). Another possibility is a connection with the election of the new Pope Pius VII in March 1800 in Venice, after a very difficult conclave in Venice that began in December 1799, soon after the death of Pius VI and just before the death of Dini on 2 November 1799. - Spine slightly damaged; some browning. In good condition.

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Manuscript of the first treatment of post-Copernican astronomy by a Muslim scholar
24

Ibrâhim Haqqi, Erzurumlu. Marifetname [The Book of Knowledge and Skills]. [Ottoman Empire, ca 1760]. [Ottoman Empire, ca 1760]. Folio (209 x 318 mm). 459, (2), 14 (but: 13) ff. of index, numerous errors in Arabic pagination, but complete according to catchwords, numbered throughout by a later owner in pencil from left to right, 1-474 ff. Ottoman Turkish on thin, polished, cream-coloured laid paper. Text is in fine naskh script with black and red ink within a red double-lined border, 31 lines of text within a written area of 232 x 112 mm. Occasional red underlining, sections usually demarcated by a single word of red text on a line with a red border on either side. 11 full-page colour illustrations of scientific diagrams, 8 full-page coloured tables and 5 coloured half-page illustrations, as well as a round, black and red ink diagram on leaf 448v. Contemporary full calf, expertly rebacked with six compartments of raised bands and gilt motifs, gilt red title label, all edges speckled red.

EUR 28,000.00

A fine 18th century manuscript copy of the famous scholarly encyclopedia, not printed until 1835 (in Bulaq). The "Marifetname", or "Book of Gnosis" is a compilation of astronomical, astrological, mathematical, anatomical, psychological, philosophical as well as mystical religious texts. It is famous for containing the first treatment of post-Copernican astronomy by a Muslim scholar. - Ibrahim Haqqi Erzurumi (1703-80) is considered an outstanding figure of 18th century Ottoman Turkey. Based on an immense knowledge of the Sufi branch of Islam as well as his studies in Western science, he devoted himself to the domains of both religion and science, considering both a means of approaching God. - Occasional smudging of ink; minor offsetting on pages facing illustrations, leaves 7-11 with minor waterstains in the upper corner margins, leaves 12-18 expertly reinforced in the upper margin, with rather severe loss to text in upper half of leaves 14v and 15. Text appears to be lost on 378r (faint traces of text still remain). Leaves 343v-350v have dark pink stain in centre of text toward gutter (no loss), likewise on 443v-463v. Leaves 448-454 have had their margins reinforced. Leaves numbered 449 and 450 must be switched, as well as 453 and 454. Altogether a very appealing copy with the numerous illustrations showing fine detail.
¶ Cf. Zenker I, 1709. F. Gülen, "Key Concepts in the Practice of Sufism," p. 106, n. 69. Z. Virk, "Science and Technology in Ottoman Sultanate".

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The first treatment of post-Copernican astronomy by a Muslim scholar, first printing
25

Ibrâhim Haqqi, Erzurumlu. Marifetname. Bulaq, al-Matbaa ül-Kubra, 1255 AH (= 1835 AD). Bulaq, al-Matbaa ül-Kubra, 1255 AH (= 1835 AD). Folio (190 x 285 mm). 23, (1), 563, (1) pp. Modern green binding.

EUR 8,500.00

First edition of the "Book of Gnosis", an encyclopedic Ottoman Turkish work by Erzurumlu Ibrâhim Hakki (Ibrahim El-Haqqi, 1703-80?) on astronomy, mathematics, anatomy, psychology, philosophy, and Sufi mysticism. Compiled from 400 sources and completed in 1757, the book was written in a layman's language. It is famous for containing the first treatment of post-Copernican astronomy by a Muslim scholar. - Well preserved in a modern binding.
¶ Zenker I, 1709. Özege, M.S. Eski Harflerle Basilmis Türkçe Eserler Katalogu III, p. 1025, no. 12259. OCLC 21607393.

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Manuscript Wall Map
26

[China]. Manuscript map of China. China, ca 1780. China, ca 1780. Manuscript map of 81 x 80 cm on mulberry paper, entirely in contemporary hand colour, folded between its original blue paper covers and preserved in a black modern leather protective case. Text in classical Chinese. Scale: ca 1:8,500,000.

EUR 45,000.00

Superb, unique manuscript map of China executed towards 1780, under the powerful Qing dynasty, showing the whole extent of the Empire at the height of its power. No bibliography appears to mention our map, which is likely unique and is not known to have been published. It presents a major historical interest because it was drawn during the golden age of the Chinese civilization, when the borders of the Empire were more far-flung than ever. In fact, the reigns of Yonghzheng (1723-1735) and Qianlong are considered the zenith of power of the Qing Empire, which spread out over more than 13 million square kilometres - a size unmatched in Chinese history before or after. - Qianlong (1711-99), the fourth emperor of the Qing dynasty, reigned over China from October 18th, 1735 until February 9th, 1796. His reign is considered the golden age of Chinese civilization, the height of the Qing Dynasty. The Emperor, an ambitious statesman conscious of his duty, expanded the borders of the Chinese Empire towards central Asia. A poet, accomplished painter and master of calligraphy, he promoted the development of Chinese culture across the empire and gathered one of the most important collections of art in the world. He founded the library of the four treasures, Siku Quanshu, so as to establish the largest collection of books in the history of China. This was a period of great territorial expansion and interior stability: under Qianlong, the Chinese Empire grew considerably, particularly in central Asia. Chinese Turkestan was incorporated into the Empire and renamed Xinjiang, while in the west, the valley of Ili was conquered. The present map is filled with geographical and historical details magnificently hand-written in classical Chinese. The legend indicates the distances from Nagasaki and gives multiple details about each and every Chinese province and the neighbouring countries. It also provides information about the population of the neighbouring countries such as the Philippines, Vietnam, and Java. The artist uses several colours to distinguish the various provinces of China as well as the neighbouring countries. Some elements depicted on the map are of particular interest, such as the clearly delineated Great Wall, from north-east to north-west, and the Gobi Desert, in the north and north-east of the map. Also, the illustration of the mouth of the great Yellow River is noteworthy. This river, the cradle of the Chinese civilization, has been known for changing its course since antiquity. Today, it runs to the Bohai Sea in the north of the Shandong province. On the present map, however, as on other contemporary maps, the mouth of the river is located in the south of the Jiangsu province. Other features shown include the Dongting Lake, in the Hunan province, the most important source of water in China; the sacred mountain of Taoism, Dong Yue Dai Shan, which all Chinese hope to climb one day; Korea and the Yalu River, the border between China and Korea; Japan and the sea of Japan in the north-east; Taiwan; Mongolia in the north; in the south-west, Vietnam, Malaysia, Java, the Philippines. - A red stamp of a previous owner in Chinese characters in the lower right corner of the map. The map has a high degree of precision, as 1 cm represents 100 Li (approximately 85 km). A superb and unique manuscript hand-coloured map of China, in perfect condition, revealing the extent of the Chinese Empire in the mid-18th century.

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The life of the Prophet in 14 plates
27

Baccanti, [Alberto]. Maometto, legislatore degli Arabi e fondatore dell'Impero musulmano.... Poema. Casalmaggiore, Fratelli Bizzarri, 1791. Casalmaggiore, Fratelli Bizzarri, 1791. Large 4to. 2 vols. (6), 199, (1) pp. (4), 197, (3) pp. With two engraved frontispieces and 12 engraved plates by Paolo Araldi, vignettes to titles. Contemporary boards covered with tree-marbled paper, gilt red morocco labels.

EUR 4,500.00

First and only edition of this rare epic version of the life of Muhammad in twelve cantos of ottava rima, complemented with a series of 12 full-page engravings depicting salient moments in the Prophet's life, and two portraits (the author, and Muhammad on horseback), all after drawings by the painter Paolo Araldi (who was a native of Casalmaggiore, the author's birth place as well as the place of printing of this book). Baccanti's introduction reveals the author's intent, perhaps implicit in the choice of heroic metre: to celebrate the deeds of a remarkable leader, a singularly gifted man capable of uniting tribes, and to reflect and indulge contemporary European taste and expectations with fantastical imaginary and romantically orientalist backdrops and costumes. - Slight chafe mark to upper cover of first volume. Contemporary engraved bookplate (N. D. Marchionis de Dionysiis) and library shelfmark labels to the front pastedowns. A wonderfully pristine, clean, crisp copy.
¶ Chauvin XI, p. 235, no. 775. Not in the Arcadian Library, not in Atabey or Blackmer. OCLC finds 7 copies in institutions worldwide, COPAC lists none in the UK.

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Luxury edition
28

Brand, [Johann] C[hristian]. Zeichnungen nach dem gemeinen Volke besonders Der Kaufruf... in Wien. Etudes prises dans le bas peuple et principalement Les Cris de Vienne. Nach dem Leben gezeichnet v. C. Brand Professor der bildenden Künste. Vienna, T[ranquillo] Mollo, [after 1798]. Vienna, T[ranquillo] Mollo, [after 1798]. Folio (348 x 474 mm). Engr., coloured t. p., 45 engr. plates in original colour and toned borders. Contemp. half calf with marbled covers; spine attractively gilt (remains of giltstamped spine label; modern red cover label).

EUR 35,000.00

Luxury copy of the third edition, which contained more plates than any previous one. Engraved by C. and Fr. Brand, J. Feigel, C. Conti, J. E. and S. Mansfeld, Quirin Mark, J. Mössmer, S. Schytz and others. The plates show the various professions, peddlers and travelling salesmen who were common sights on the Viennese markets of the late 18th century: the pretzel baker, chicken seller, sausage salesman, postman, bird-dealer, milk lady, night watchman, etc. All drawn by the Viennese painter and engraver Johann Christian Brand (1722-95), who taught at the Vienna Academy of Arts. The collection had been first published in 1775-76 comprising 40 plates; a second issue released in 1780 contained the same material. A new edition produced in 1796 contained a mere 38 plates, to which the third edition added seven completely new illustrations. This edition was published in uncoloured and coloured versions, as well as in the present luxury edition distinguished by its inked and colour-toned borders and especially delicate colouring. - Corners bumped; spine-ends damaged. Insignificant fingerstaining to wide blank margins near beginning; the plates, usually encountered only in strongly browned state, are very clean, showing luminous, crisp colour; unusually fine wove paper. An outstanding copy.
¶ Beall Ö 5. Kaut 6. Cf. Lipperheide Ebb 1. Colas 423. Hiler 110. Massin 219.

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Efforts on behalf of the Arabic language and culture
29

Jones, Sir William. The Works of Sir William Jones. [With:] Supplemental... volumes to the Works of Sir William Jones. London, 1799-1804. London, 1799-1804. Folio (250 x 305 mm). 6 vols. of Works, 3 vols. of Supplements, vol. 3 being: The Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Correspondence, of Sir William Jones, by Lord Teignmouth. A total of 9 vols. with 2 portraits and 84 plates (some folding). Splendidly bound in contemporary, uniform gilt tree calf, spines gilt in compartments with black spine labels.

EUR 12,500.00

First edition. - While serving as a judge of the high court at Calcutta, the British orientalist Sir William Jones (1746-94) became a student of ancient India and founded the Asiatic Society of Bengal. He is best known for his famous proposition that the Indo-European languages sprang from a common source and were genetically related - a suggestion soon to be proved by the linguist Franz Bopp. By the end of his life, Jones had learned 28 languages, including Arabic and Chinese, often by teaching himself. His scholarship helped to generate widespread interest in Eastern history, language and culture, and it led to new directions in linguistic research. Among his many efforts on behalf of the Arabic language and culture are his "Discourse on the Arabs" (I, 35 ff.), his discussion of Arabic idyllic poetry (II, 390 ff.) and Arabic poets in general (II, 587 ff.), his edition of an Arabic elegy by Mi'r Muhammed Husain, offered as an specimen of Arabic in his essay "On the orthography of Arabick words" (I, 212 ff., with plates III and V), as well as his edition of "The Mahomedan Law of Succession to the Property of Intestates in Arabick, Engraved on Copper Plates" (III, 467 ff.) and his study "On the introduction of Arabick into Persian" (Suppl. I, 251 ff.). - A fine set from the library of Marmaduke Wyvill (1791-1872), M.P. for York from 1820 to 1830, with his ownership to flyleaves.

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To Anna Pavlovna
30

Alexander I., Emperor of Russia (1777-1825). Autograph letter signed (paraph). St. P[etersburg], 30. VIII. 1801. St. P[etersburg], 30. VIII. 1801. 8vo. 2 pp. on bifolium.

EUR 4,500.00

Apparently to his sister, Anna Pavlovna of Russia, reassuring her of his friendship: "[...] Tomorrow we leave for Moscow and my wife separates from her parents. This will not make the scene any gayer, as you can well imagine [...]" (transl.). - From the "Autograph Collection / Dr. Max Thorek / Chicago, Ill".

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