The Vice of Dice
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Augustine of Hippo, Saint. Sermones de verbis domini [and other works]. [Austria], 1448. [Austria], 1448. Small folio (235 x 314 mm). Latin ms. (gothic book cursive) on paper. 550 pp. (page numbers addeed in pencil, c. 1900, written on 547 pp.). Leaf size 210 x 295 mm, written area mainly 140 x 190 mm. 2 cols., mainly 30-31 lines (but final gathering: 41-43 lines), partly rubricated with red chapter headings and ends; numerous red Lombardic initials. Contemp. blindstamped Gothic calf binding over wooden boards. Wants the fittings and clasps.

EUR 45,000.00

Fine late mediaeval manuscript, principally comprising sermons of St Augustine (pp. 1-410), but also containing four shorter treatises of his slightly older contemporary, Gregory of Nazianzus (pp. 411-523); dated "1448" at the end. Bound after this are 12 additional leaves, apparently penned slightly later by a different scribe, with theological writings of the early 15th century, namely two treatises by the French mystic Jean Gerson (pp. 527-540) and the treatise on the vice of dice by the Vienna canon Johann Geuss (pp. 541-550). - Contents: A) St Augustine. 1-121: Sermones de verbis domini secundum Mattheum (with a table of contents, followed by "Evangelium audivimus ... agite penitentiam"); 122-181: Sermones de verbis domini secundum Lucam (inc. "Petite et dabitur"); 182-344: Sermones de verbis domini secundum Johannem (inc. "Capitulum Evangelii quod lectum est"); 345-347: Sermo de verbis domini evangelio secundum Lucam de verbis apostoli, omnes nos manifestari oporte ante tribunal Christi (inc. "Omnium Christianorum spes"); 348-410: Liber de spiritu et anima (inc. "Quoniam dictum est mihi", expl. "quem cernere finis est doloris"). - B) Gregory of Nazianzus. 411-470: De urbana vita [ad Pronianum; tr. Rufinus] (inc. "Proficiscenti mihi ex urbe magnopere iniungebas Aproniane fili"); 470-487: De nativitate domini [oratio XXXVIII] (inc. "Christus nascitur"); 487-506: De luminibus et secundis epiphaniis [oratio XXXIX] (inc. "Iterum Jesus meus et iterum"); 506-523: De pentecoste [oratio XLI] (inc. "De sollemnitate huius diei pauca dicenda sunt"; expl. "et potestas in spiritu sancto in secula seculorum. Amen"); followed by date: "et finitus est liber anno etc. 1448"; 524-526 vacant. C) Johannes Gerson: 527-537: Tractatus de trepidantibus accedere ad celebrationem misse post pollutionem in sompniis habitum (inc. "Dubitandum est aput me"); 537-540: De duplicii stuatu in dei ecclesia, curatorum et privilegiatorum (inc. "Pax quam omnibus"; expl. "inveniri. Deo gratias. Deo gratias"). D) [Johannes Geuss]. 541-550 [Sermo de ludo alearum] (inc. "Confundatur sorcium distributio scribitur Numeri ultimo. Hec verba possunt intellegi de sortilegio lusorum et confusione ipsorum"; expl. "unam libram et sic posset fieri recompensatio" (lacking the final four columns of text). - Occasional addenda and marginalia by a roughly contemporary hand in the wide blank margin throughout. The 12-leaf quire bound at the end (watermark: type Piccard V [libra], section V, no. 294 ["Vienna 1461"]) must originally have been followed by a now-lost final leaf of text. Binding rubbed and bumped; small crack to upper cover; traces of a pasted grey paper wrapper. Occasional slight browning to manuscript; insignificant waterstain near beginning. Slight tear to first 3 ff. (not touching text), loss of corner to first leaf (loss of page number and a 17th century monastic ownership "Conven[tus] C[...]").

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15th century manuscript, uniting the philosophical traditions of two cultures, Arab and Western
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Thomas Aquinas, St. Summa contra gentiles. (And:) Al-Kindi. De unitate, De... intellectu, and De somnio et visione ad imperatorum dolium. Prob. Burgundy, 1464. Prob. Burgundy, 1464. Folio (395 x 255 mm). Latin ms. on paper. 221 ff. (instead of 222: wants fol. 1, otherwise complete). Two cols., 60 lines. With 8 large gilt initials and numerous four-line lombardic initials in red and blue with penwork flourishes. Early 17th-c. blindstamped calf.

EUR 45,000.00

Likely unique compilation, signed and dated by the scribe himself ("Ego Anthonius le bysse de N. gallicus scripsique complevi hec presens opus Anno domini 1464. Vive Bourgogne", fol. 220v), and presenting a remarkable and incongruous juxtaposition of Aquinas's 'Summa de veritate catholicae fidei contra gentiles' (ten years before the first printed edition appeared at Strasbourg in 1474) alongside three extremely rare Arabic texts composed by the Muslim philosopher Al-Kindi. - Thomas's 'Treatise on the Truth of the Catholic Faith, against the Unbelievers', written as a philosophical exposition and defence of the Christian Faith, was originally intended as a closely-reasoned treatise persuading intellectual Muslims of the truth of Christianity but has since become one of the principal works of mediaeval Christian philosophy. Al-Kindi, known as "the Philosopher of the Arabs", was a Muslim Arab scientist, philosopher, mathematician and physician. He was the first of the Muslim peripatetic philosophers, and is unanimously hailed as the "father of Islamic or Arabic philosophy" for his synthesis, adaptation, and promotion of Greek and Hellenistic philosophy in the Muslim world. In the present copy we find Al-Kindi's main works 'De Intellectu' (fol. 218v) and 'De somnio et visione ad imperatorem dolium' (fol. 219r), which are known in no more than four or five ms. copies, all in institutional possession (Oxford, Venice, and Paris). For his work devoted to the question of God's nature "De unitate" (fol. 217v), or 'On the unity of Allah and the limited nature of the body of the universe', no textual witness is found in the In Principio database. - Al-Kindi was one of a small group of Muslim learned men who made their own contribution to the heritage received from the Greeks. Although he was primarily interested in the natural sciences, he has been called the "philosopher of the Arabs" since unlike later Islamic philosophers he was of Arab descent. He wrote 265 treatises, most of them now lost. He asserted "one of the most marked features of Islamic thought - the belief that there was only one active intellect for all humanity, and that every human soul was moved and informed by this separated active intellect" (Leff 1958). In perhaps his best known work "De intellectu" (fol. 218v), Al-Kindi followed Aristotle in distinguishing between two different intellects comprising man’s faculties of knowledge. His treatise on sleep and dreaming ("De somnio et visione ad imperatorem dolium", fol. 219r) is a key work in the early Medieval understanding of the psyche and of human thought. More of Al-Kindi's work survives in Latin than in Arabic, but Mediaeval Europe knew only of a few fragments of his work, which had been translated into Latin in the twelfth century by Gerard of Cremona. - Waterstaining near beginning (ink rather faded); a closed tear to f. 221, some staining to two more leaves, otherwise clean and well preserved. Prepared for the Dukes of Maine (offsetting of their arms on fol. 1r); last in the Bergendal collection.
¶ Lexikon des Mittelalters V, 1155-1156. P. Adamson, "Al-Kindi", in: Albino Nagy (ed.), Die philosophischen Abhandlungen des Ja'qu-b ben Ishaq al-Kindi, BGPhMA (Münster 1897) 2-5. W. P. Stoneman, A summary guide to the medieval and later manuscripts in the Bergendal Collection (Toronto 1997) 173-174.

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A 15th-Century Vernacular Account of a Pilgrimage to the Holy Land
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Barbatre, [Pierre], Norman priest (b. 1525). Account of a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1480. [France, after 1480, circa 1490-1500]. [France, after 1480, circa 1490-1500]. 4to (209 x 165 mm). Middle French decorated manuscript on paper (watermark "licorne sanglée", pointing to Normandy: similar to Briquet 10387 & 10390 - Coutances 1497 and Frene d'Archeveque, 1499). 116 pp., collation: i1, ii8, iii8, iv8, v8, vi8, vii8, viii10; complete save for loss to the lower corner of the final leaf, concerning 9 lines of text on the last page but one. Incipit: "In nomine domini Amen. 1480. L'an de grace mil quatre cens octante, le mardi IIIIe jour d'apvril apres pasques, je, Pierre Barbatre, prebstre, aagé de LV ans ou environ, me party de la ville de Vernon pour et intencion d'aler en Hierusalem visiter le sainct sepulchre Nostresegneur Jesuschrist et les aultres sainctz lieulx de la terre saincte"; explicit: "et la feusme attendans passer a Ravennes, pour tirer a Ancone a cause que avions loué une barque a Venize pour nous passer la mer jusques audit Ancone. Et nous coutoit le passage de maistre Nicole, de Sainct Omer, mon frere et moy .x. marcelins". Bound in a parchment leaf from an 11th c. codex, containing fragments of the "Passio Pauli" attributed to Pseudo-Lin and a fragment of the "Life of St Ethbin", both in Latin (lower cover poorly legible).

EUR 185,000.00

Rare document containing a first-hand vernacular account of a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1480, the only expedition allowed to leave Venice for the Palestine in that year. - The priest Pierre Barbatre relates the story of his journey, which he begins at the age of ca. 55 years at the Norman town of Vernon on the Seine. He travels south via Chartres and Orléans, Savoy, Turin, Leghorn, Milan (where he reports on the ongoing construction of the cathedral), Brescia, Vicenza and Padua to Venice; here, he spends a month, giving details of Venetian life, including the great festivals. On 6 June 1480 he embarks on the "Contarina" - the only pilgrim galley to make the voyage to the Holy Land that year, for the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1463-1479 had led to a sharp drop in the numbers of pilgrims, and boats were strictly controlled. Only about sixty pilgrims would return from the journey. Barbatre gives accounts of the various places he visits during the voyage - especially Rhodes, which he portrays with much precision - before the ship reaches Jaffa on 24 July 1480. He describes his exhilaration at finally seeing the holy places of Palestine and visits Ramla, Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Jericho as well as the Dead Sea; his story provides much information about the relic cult, local customs and the political situation after the recent Turkish offensive. - It appears that Barbatre did not manage to return to France after his pilgrimage, for his account of the return journey ends abruptly with the embarkation for Ancona. In spite of much research having been dedicated to his text, too little is still known about its author. While the present manuscript constitutes the sole witness for Barbatre's travelogue, scholarship is lucky to possess three further accounts of this same 1480 pilgrimage by other authors: that of Sancto Brascha of Milano, chancellor to Ludovico Sforza, whose "Itinerario ... alla santissima città di Gerusalemme" was published at Milan in 1481; the account by Félix Faber (Schmidt), a Dominican from Ulm who was Barbatre's travel companion (ed. C. Hassler, Stuttgart 1843-49), and an anonymous report by a Parisian traveller, published in Paris in 1517 as "Voyage de la Saincte cyte de Hierusalem en l'an mil quatre cens quatre vingtz". - Provenance: a fair copy prepared in France, likely in Normandy, by a professional scribe after 1480, probably following the author's own notes. Rediscovered in 1972 by the French physician Dr. Lemonnier in the estate of his grandmother Henriette Rooy, née Masmoudet, whose father had been an educator at Athis-Mons (Orge) (cf. Pinzuti/Tucoo-Chala [1973], p. 8). Previously in a collection owned by the Duguet family, connected with the painter Eugène Fromentin. - Binding tattered, some writing on parchment faded, but stitching tight with the manuscript in excellent condition and well legible throughout.
¶ N. Pinzuti & P. Tucoo-Chala (eds.), Le voyage de Pierre Barbatre à Jérusalem en 1480. Edition critique d'un manuscrit inédit, in: Annuaire-Nulletin de la Societe de l'Histoire de France, 1972/73 (1974), pp. 75-172. The same, "Sur un récit inédit de voyage aux Lieux Saints sous Louis XI", in: Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, 117:1, 1973, pp. 188-204. Europäische Reiseberichte des späten Mittelalters II (1999), no. 23. P. Cantoni, Les pelerinages a Jerusalem et au mont Sinai du XIVe au XVIe siecle, diplome d'archiviste paleographe, Ecole nationale des chartes (Paris 1972), pp. 33-42. Dansette (1977), p. LXXI. Esch (1984), pp. 384-416. Crouzet-Pavan (1984), pp. 489-535. Ashtor (1985), p. 211. Chevallier (1987), pp. 366, 370f.

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From one of the greatest mediaeval German libraries
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Monastic devotional manuscript. Latin compendium containing an Antiphonal for the whole... liturgical year, a Hymnal, the Common of the Saints and a number of short texts on the Art of Dying. Central Germany (Erfurt), c. 1498. Central Germany (Erfurt), c. 1498. Latin ms. (brown ink) on paper. 258 leaves (watermark: Briquet 4895), complete (11th gathering misbound between 18th and 20th, corrected by a contemporary scribe). Single column, 17-24 lines in a single semi-cursive, legible German hand. Capitals striked in red, rubrics and small initials in red, larger initials (2-5 lines) in same in ornate penstrokes. Contemp. monastic binding of blindtooled pigskin (rollstamps of flowerheads, fleurs-de-lys and agnus dei within roundels and lozenges, enclosing a central panel of chevrons) over thick wooden boards sewn on 3 double thongs; original red-stained leather thong stitching at head and foot of spine; 5 small metal bosses on each board; remnants of single clasp with metalwork fittings; front board with original large paper title-label (discoloured).

EUR 45,000.00

A fine monastic manuscript from one of the greatest mediaeval German libraries, the Charterhouse of St. Salvatorberg in Erfurt, in an excellent state of preservation and in its original binding. Apart from its liturgical contents, it holds a number of versions of a rare text written by members of the Erfurt Charterhouse, one of which is evidently of great importance for the history of the text and its future study, and others which appear to be unique. - The volume contains the antiphons with some associated versicles, collects and hymns for the liturgical feasts of the entire year, opening with those for the feast of an apostle (f. 2r), and ending with that for an elect (f. 155r). Of special note here are the feasts of the saints from Germany and the neighbouring regions to the east: Ulrich of Augsburg, 4 July (f. 24v), Gereon of Cologne, 10 Oct. (ff. 76r & 77v), Elizabeth, queen of Hungary, 19 Nov. (ff. 85r & 104r), Stanislaus of Poland, 7 May, Wenceslaus of Poland, 28 Sept., and Ludmilla, the grandmother of Wenceslaus, 16 Sept. (ff. 149v & 150v); as well as a handful of Anglo-Saxon missionaries and saints, including Oswald, king of Northumbria, 5 Aug. (f. 39r); and the two SS. Ewalds of Northumbria who died in Westphalia in 692, 1-3 Oct. (fol. 70r). A hymnal for the Temporal follows on f. 120v, with the same for the Sanctoral from f. 133v. After these come prayers for various feasts and saint days (f. 155v), as well as prayers ascribed to Pope Gregory or addressed to the Virgin Mary, which promise their readers reduced time in purgatory (ff. 170v & 176r); and others for the dead (f. 177v). The Common of the Saints opens on f. 182v and ends on f. 231v. Around 1500, a short series of closely related devotional texts were added on gatherings at the end of the volume. The first three are longer or shorter variants of a version of a well-known text on how to achieve a happy death, the "Modus disponendi se ad mortem", in the extended version of a previously unidentified Carthusian writer (cf. R. Rudolf, Ars moriendi, 1957, pp. 75-82). All open with variants of the incipit "confitebor tibi clementissime deus pater multitudinem magnitudinem et enormitatem". The text is apparently unedited. Other mss. containing a version of this Carthusian version of the work are recorded at the Augsburg, Munich and Graz university libraries as well as at the library of the monastery at Stams and the Slovenian and Austrian national libraries. The author of this text is normally given only as “N” (for "Nomine"), and this has led academic consensus to state that the author is unknown and undated. However, one of the Augsburg mss. names its author as "Johannes" and dates it to 1481, and the Vienna ms., while giving no name, dates the text to 1476. In addition, a lengthy version of the text (closely corresponding to that of ff. 234r-236r of the present ms.) was published in the "Neujahrsblatt für Basels Jugend" for 1838 (pt. II, pp. 6-7), naming the author as "Ego frater Martinus indignus nomine carthusiensis ordinis". Clearly the arguments for authenticity are neither strong nor straightforward, and hitherto there have been no indications where the text might have been composed. The present manuscript casts a great deal of light on these questions, and promises to cast much more in the future: here, a lengthy introduction on f. 240r offers the date of the copying of one of these texts as 1500, and notes the involvement of a Carthusian monk named "Jacobus Volradus", as well as naming the author as Johannes "ordinis carthusiensis et monachus professus domus eiusdem ordinis propter erffurdiam" (f. 240r), and again on f. 234r as Johannes "indignus nomine carthusiensis ordinis monachus et sacerdos professus domus sancti salvatoris". On each of the occasions when Johannes is named, a few centimetres of following text which clearly gave more information on him are lightly covered with ink. With sensitive handling and careful study these might prove readable (note in particular f. 234r, where individual letterforms are easily discernible beneath the ink panel in normal light). However, significant questions remain for the future student: the first and shortest version of the text here is ascribed to "Frater Marcellinus indignus quidam nomine Carthusiensis ordinis monachorum et sacerdos professus" (f. 233v). This clearly agrees, albeit in a slightly garbled form, with the printed identification of Martinus as the author, despite the fact that the text printed in 1838 in connection with the Charterhouse at Basel corresponds here to a version named as the work of Johannes. There may have been two authors who worked together, or one who revised the others text soon after it was finished. This manuscript appears to be the only surviving copy to name the main potential author as a member of the Carthusians of Erfurt, offers further details on him for future students of it, and with the inclusion of multiple copies of different lengths (and perhaps by two different authors) will almost certainly add significantly to our knowledge of the composition and earliest stages of this text. - Following these are three related tracts: the first opens "Sed ut dictum est ut tua iusticia" (ff. 254r-257r), the second with "Et pro omnibus volo omni modo manere" (ff. 257v-258v), the latter also mentioning Jacobus Volradus. The third opens "Et ego frater Marcellinus idem et eandem protestationem cupio et desidero" (ff. 257v-258r), again noting Marcellinus as its author. None appears in the vast In Principio database, and these may well be unique to this manuscript. - Provenance: 1. Library of the Charterhouse of St. Salvatorberg, Erfurt, Germany (contemporary and late 16th c. ownerships on pastedown and beginning of main text). Founded in 1372, the Erfurt charterhouse quickly attracted wealthy Thuringian benefactors. The Carthusian order led the way in biblical scholarship in the 15th century, and the library at Erfurt grew rapidly, coming to be one of the most important cultural repositories in Germany. It was dispersed in 1803. - 2. John Mozley Stark (fl. 1851-88), bookseller of Hull and London, who would have acquired the book on one of his frequent buying trips to the continent and who offered this in his List no. IX (1856) as no. 105, for 12 shillings. - 3. Gillyatt Sumner (d. 1877), antiquarian and collector of Woodmansey near Beverley (his ownership on front flyleaf, dated 1857). Sold for £5 in his 1877 Beverley house sale (lot 576). - 4. Charles Edward Forster (1837-1904) of Driffield, East Yorkshire (his ownership, dated 1894, on front flyleaf). - 5. By descent to his son Edward F. Forster (1875-1931), with his ownership (dated 1925) pencilled below. - 6. Adrian Massey of Hull (his mid-20th-c. ownership on flyleaf). - Extensive description available upon request.

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Presentation copy of an early work on musical theory, no copy recorded at auction
5

Quercu, Simon de. Opusculum musices perquam brevissimum. Vienna, Johann Winterburger, 1509. Vienna, Johann Winterburger, 1509. 4to. 48 unnumbered pages. With the Guidonian hand woodcut in red and black, 4 woodcut initials, woodcut device at end, several xylographic tables and music examples. Modern white boards with title lettered on spine.

EUR 48,000.00

Rare first edition, of which just a few copies survive: the author's presentation copy, a partly erased inscription at the end reading "Munus Autoris [...] An 11, 7 martii [...]". Quercu was choirmaster to Duke Ludovico Sforza of Milan and accompanied his two sons as a tutor to the court of Vienna. The present treatise, a famous and highly original book on musical theory for young scholars, was probably used in the musical education of the duke's sons. "The first part, 'Musica plana', deals with the modes, intervals, note names, solmization and solmization syllables, and mutation. The second part, 'Musica mensuralis', deals with note lengths, rests, ligatures, mensuration signs, alteration, imperfection and mensural proportions. The third part, 'Contrapunctus', considers consonances, dissonances and polyphonic writing. His teaching is illustrated with many music examples" (New Grove). The finely printed book includes on p. (4) the Guidonian hand, named after Guido of Arezzo (992?-1050), who introduced into music theory this mnemonic device to help teach singers learn to sight-read. Each portion of the hand represents a specific note in the hexachord system; during instruction, a teacher would indicate the series of notes by pointing to them on their hand to have the students sing them. - Light washing traces. Inscription recording "A gift from the author, 7 March [15]11", on the final page. German dealer’s catalogue clipping bound in before title. A monogram stamp on the lower pastedown identifies the collection of Otto Schäfer in Schweinfurt (purchased in 1958). No auction record for this edition (and only one for the second edition; cf. ABPC/RBH). USTC lists 5 copies only held in libraries including this copy.
¶ VD 16, Q 39. Denis p. 22. Panzer IX, p. 3, no. 13. New Grove XV, 504. MGG X, 1811. USTC 679907.

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The first systematic study to address exclusively the education of women: a fabled rarity, the original first edition
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Vives, Juan Luis. De institutione foeminae [...] libri tres, mira eruditione,... elegantia, brevitate, facilitate, plane aurei, pietateq[ue] & sanctimonia, vere Christiani, Christianae in primis Virgini, deinde maritae, postremo viduae, novo instituendi argumento longe utilissimi. Quid autem singuli libri toto opere contineant, sequenti pagella, videre est. (Antwerp, Michiel Hillen van Hoochstraten for Franz Birckmann, 1524). (Antwerp, Michiel Hillen van Hoochstraten for Franz Birckmann, 1524). 4to (140 x 195 mm). (96) ff., numbered in an early hand (omitting f. 77). Elaborate woodcut border on title-page, featuring elephant and cherubim, and with several large woodcut initials in text. Bound in early limp vellum with manuscript title on spine; edges stained red. 17th century portrait of Vives added to inner cover. Lengthy, exegetical early annotations to the first book 'De Instituenda Virgine' along with readership markings. A very good copy from the Harrach Library (Austria/Madrid), with 19th century stamp on title.

EUR 125,000.00

Very rare first edition of "the first systematic study to address explicitly and exclusively the universal education of women", commissioned by Henry VIII's wife, Catherine of Aragon, who was at the time rearing her own daughter, Mary Tudor. Translated and adapted by numerous followers, Vives' treatise would go on to be read in almost every European vernacular, often by women themselves. The first edition, however, is rare in census and in commerce - and contains passages, particularly on chastity and intellectual capacity, which were entirely re-written in later incarnations. A fundamental document for the role of women in Early Modern society - and particularly in Early Modern England - this copy is especially remarkable for its state of preservation. An early reader of Vives has here added his own comments to the chapters on the seclusion of maidens and examples of feminine virtue. - "De Institutione Foeminae Christianae" consists of 3 books, one for each stage of woman's life: maidenhood, marriage, and widowhood. In his preface to Queen Catherine, Vives quotes Aristotle to the effect that states which do not provide for the education of women deprive themselves of a great source of their prosperity; yet as Charles Fantazzi points out, Vives is in fact here caught in a delicate double bind, "insistent on a subordinate, submissive role for women, the text must take care to expound its message not only without alienating the queen but rather, indeed, with the goal of winning her favour." Despite its dedication and although Vives specifically adapts his prose style for a female readership, the treatise is hardly pro-woman: "the 'Education' is determined to be both a reference book for men on how to control their women, as well as an edifying treatise for women to absorb as a source of proper behaviour" (Kolsky). Nevertheless, Vives' praise of women's intellectual capacity and his advocation of some form of universal learning for females are viewed as landmarks for modern historians of women and gender. - According to Fantazzi, "'De Institutione' enjoyed an enormous popularity and was generally regarded as the most authoritative statement on this subject throughout the sixteenth century, especially in England, where it found favor with Catholics and Protestants alike. There can be no denying that merely by attaching such importance to the education of women, Vives laid the groundwork for the Elizabethan age of the cultured woman." It was rapidly translated into English, enjoying some nine editions in that language during the 16th century alone (cf. Higginbotham, p. 69). According to Pollie Bromilow, the dozens of vernacular translations were partly aimed at women themselves, who had no knowledge of Latin; and thus a large segment of its readership during the 16th century was in fact female. Appearing in an undated edition as early as 1528 or 1529, the English translation is rather an adaptation of Vives' text begun by Thomas More but completed by his household tutor, William Hyrde, who must have used the present edition in its preparation. - In 1538 Vives brought out a revised Latin edition reflecting many changes to the original text. This is the edition most commonly cited by scholars, probably thanks to its greater availability. The sections on maidens and the preservation of maidenhood (in all its meanings), however, were substantially re-written - notably, treating many of the same subjects which interested the annotator of the present copy! Chapter 6, on virginity, for example, "was subjected to a complete revision, so that it bears little resemblance to the first published version. It is obvious that Vives struggled over the proper approach to this topic. In the original version, he suddenly abandons his more discursive style for a rather personal and, one might add, paternalistic tête-á-tête with a young woman" (Fantazzi, p. 18). Vives' views on women's intellectual capacities also develop between the two editions. - At the outbreak of the Reformation Vives was a close friend of Erasmus, who had commissioned him to write a commentary on Augustine's "City of God" in 1521. Perhaps seeking refuge from the political and religious turmoil of Europe, Vives turned his attention to England from this point onward. He dedicated his edition of "De Civitate Dei" to Henry VIII in 1522, and already in May of 1523 was able to present a manuscript of his "De Institutione Foeminae Christianae" to Queen Catherine in person. At Henry's court he grew close to the circle of Thomas More and produced a further educational treatise, "De Ratione Studii Puerilis". Thanks to his growing opposition to Henry VIII's divorce proceedings, however, Vives was placed under house arrest by Cardinal Wolsley from February to April 1528, and upon his release sensibly fled the country - only to return briefly later that year in the role of Catherine's legal adviser. - Provenance: later stamp of the Harrach Library on title-page. The collection originated as the personal library of Graf Ferdinand Bonaventura von Harrach, Austrian envoy to Spain (1637-1707), and explains the characteristically Spanish binding on the present example. Ferdinand's son Aloys followed in his father's footsteps; but after his death in 1742 the collection was transferred back to the remaining Harrach family in Vienna. Finally, the collection wound up in the family castle 'Schloss Bruck an der Leitha', in Lower Austria. We have handled numerous other Harrach copies, which seem to have formed a cohesive 'personal reference library' of 16th and 17th century works for this seventeenth century statesman. - A very good copy. OCLC shows just four copies in American institutions: Harvard, the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies, Yale, and the Huntington.
¶ Nijhoff/Kronenberg 2167. Adams V 951. Brunet V, 1333. Estelrich 136. Cf. also Fantazzi's introduction to a modern translation, The Education of a Christian Woman: A Sixteenth-Century Manual (U Chicago, 2007). Kolsky, Making Examples of Women: Juan Luis Vives' The Education of a Christian Woman. Higginbotham, The Girlhood of Shakespeare's Sisters: Gender, Transgression, Adolescence (U Edinburgh, 2013). Bromilow, "An Emerging Female Readership of Print in Sixteenth-Century France?", French Studies (2013) Vol. 67, pp. 155-169.

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"d'une rareté excessive"
7

Heyden, Sebald. Musicae, id est, artis canendi libri duo. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. 4to. (8), 115, (1) pp. With armorial title woodcut, several initials and numerous music notes in the text. Contemporary limp vellum with manuscript spine title. Wants ties.

EUR 35,000.00

Extremely rare first edition of one of the most important of all classic works of musical theory, a book that enjoyed a high reputation even during the author's lifetime. In contrast to his first treatise, the 1532 "Musicae stoicheiosis" which treats exclusively "musica figurata", or polyphony, his present, second work is more comprehensive and more clearly written, though limited "to matters concerning musical compositions withount discussion of purely theoretical matters. This publication was outstanding for its many examples, drawn, according to the author's prefatory statement, from the works of the best and most renowned composers - Josquin, Obrecht, La Rue, Isaac, Brumel, Ghiselin - not only as the most useful examples but also as demonstrations of great music. The examples are presented mostly without texts or with incipits only" (New Grove). "Heyden s'est fait particulièrement connaître d'une manière avantageuse par un livre [...] ce livre est précieux pour l'histoire de l'art et de la science au seizieme siècle. Dans aucun livre de ce temps, les principes des nuances et de la notation ne sont exposés avec autant de clarté et de concision que dans celui-ci. Les nombreux exemples de Josquin, d'Obrecht, de Senfel, de Henri Isaac, de Ghiselin et d'autres, qui s'y trouvent, avec les résolutions de cas embarassants de l'ancien système de proportions, ajoutent encore au prix de cet ouvrage, qui est malheureusement d'une rareté excessive" (Fétis). All of Petreius's "printed music is of exquisite beauty [...] The printer's glory days began in 1537, with Heyden's highly respected work about choral music" (Cohen, Nürnberger Musikdrucker im 16. Jh., p. 25f.). - Occasional insignificant waterstaining to margins, but altogether a splendidly crisp, wide-margined copy with contemporary handwritten ownership of one "Anastasius de Verona" (erased) on the title page. Of the utmost rarity: a single copy in auction records of the past decades (1968, Hauswedell 158, no. 1246), and a single copy of the 1540 second edition (1942: Schab, cat. 5, no. 113; which is also the only edition kept at Cambridge).
¶ BM-STC German 404. Eitner V, 137. RISM (Écrits impr.) 412. Hirsch I, 246. Wolffheim I, 705. Teramoto (Petreius) passim. New Grove VIII, 28.

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The birth of modern anatomy: a coloured copy of the first edition, used by the surgeon of the Duke of Saxony
8

Vesalius, Andreas. De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Folio. 355 leaves and two folding sheets. Roman and italic types, occasional use of Greek and Hebrew types, printed shoulder notes. Woodcut pictorial title, author portrait, and printer’s device; 7 large, 186 mid-sized, and 22 small woodcut initials; more than 200 woodcut illustrations, including 3 full-page skeletons, 14 full-page muscle men, 5 large diagrams of veins and nerves, 10 mid-sized views of the abdomen, 2 mid-sized views of the thorax, 13 mid-sized views of the skull and brain, and numerous smaller views of bones, organs and anatomical parts. All woodcuts and initials up to page 165 in full contemporary hand colour. Contemporary blindstamped leather over wooden boards with bevelled edges, on five raised double bands, with two clasps.

EUR 950,000.00

A truly outstanding copy of one of the greatest and most appealing books in the history of science. Preserved in its original binding with the blindstamped initials of its first owner, the German physician Caspar Neefe (1514-79), and with his handwritten annotations throughout, the present copy is partly coloured by a contemporary artist (including the iconic woodcut used as title page and all anatomical illustrations up to page 165). Caspar Neefe, who later served as personal physician to Duke Albert I of Saxony, acquired the precious volume only a year after its publication and obviously consulted it extensively throughout his career as a medical practitioner. - With the publication of "De humani corporis fabrica" (when he was only twenty-eight) Vesalius revolutionized both the science of anatomy and how it was taught. In his preface he describes his disappointing experiences as a student in Paris and Louvain, stating his intention to reform the teaching of anatomy by giving in this book a complete description of the structure of the human body, thereby drawing attention "to the falsity of Galen’s pronouncements". Vesalius also broke with tradition by performing dissections himself instead of leaving this task to assistants: the striking and dramatic title illustration shows him conducting such a dissection, his hand plunged into a female cadaver (striking in itself, as only the cadavers of executed criminals could be dissected legally and female criminals were rarely executed), surrounded by a seething mass of students. - The "Fabrica" is also revolutionary for "its unprecedented blending of scientific exposition, art and typography" (Norman). The woodcuts by artists of the school of Titian are both iconographically and artistically important. The series of fourteen muscle men show landscapes that, when assembled in reverse order, form a panorama of the Euganean Hills near Padua, a scenery well known to Vesalius while he was at work on the Fabrica. - Of the few copies of the first edition to have come to the market in recent decades, only two were in a contemporary binding. Apart from Vesalius's dedication copy to Emperor Charles V (Christie's New York, 18 March 1998, lot 213: $1,652,500), only a single other partly coloured copy was previously known, a list to which ours must now be added as the third known copy in contemporary colour. - Acquired in 2017; previously in a Tyrolean private medical collection, where the book rested for three generations (erased circular library stamp in the blank lower margin of the title page): an outstanding copy hitherto unknown to scholarship (cf. the recent census published by Dániel Margócsy, University of Cambridge, below; further relevant correpondence with Dr Margócsy is available upon request). Occasional waterstaining to margins, the splendid binding a little rubbed and bumped, but altogether a wonderfully crisp, wide-margined copy of the first edition. Unquestionably the most desirable copy of a milestone in the history of science still in private hands, and likely the most important medical book obtainable for decades to come.
¶ PMM 71. VD 16, V 910. Durling 4577. Cushing VI.A.1. Eimas 281. Norman 2137. Wellcome 6560. Graesse VI.2, 289. Cf. D. Margocsy, M. Somos, S. N. Joffe: "Vesalius' Fabrica: A Report on the Worldwide Census of the 1543 and 1555 Editions", in: Social History of Medicine Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 201–223. For Neefe cf. A. Lesser, Die albertinischen Leibärzte (Petersberg 2015), p. 71-74.

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The expenditures of the Prague court in the year 1565
9

Rabenhaupt (Rabenhapp), Johann. Originals Raitunng aller Empfanng und Außgaben Johan des... Ellttern Rabenhapps vonn Suchee sr. Röm. Khaÿ. Mt. Renntmaysters im Khünigreich Beheimb als ob vonn dem Erstenn tag Januarii bis zu ennt December unnd tzu Ausganng diß fünfundsechtzigisten Jar. Prague, 1565. Prague, 1565. Folio (235 x 314 mm). German ms. on paper with calligraphic captions and several half-titles. 453 ff. Contemp. blindstamped pigskin on wooden boards. Wants ties.

EUR 18,000.00

Exceptionally attractive and important manuscript from the Bohemian Royal offices; the principal document of the Bohemian national finances in the second year of the rule of Emperor Maximilian II. A beautiful and hitherto unknown document of Renaissance bookkeeping in its well-preserved original binding. - In the present manuscript, Johann Rabenhaupt, head of the Royal bursary and responsible for the accounting year 1565, has testified the correct statement of revenues and expenditures by his signature on every page. The volume begins with an alphabetical index, arranged in double pages and listing revenues (on left) and payments (on right) by name. Among the payers and recipients are several important names, most of them members of German-Bohemian, Czech and Polish noble families, the Tyrolean glass manufacturer Sebastian Hochstetter von Scheibenegg (d. 1573), but also the great physician Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1500-77): "Petter Andreas Mathiolo [...] Ertzherzog Ferdinanden zu Osterreich LeipPhisicus, hatt zu farlicher Provision Ainhundert gulden Reinisch, die khun zwayundvierzig schockh Ainundfunffzig groschen drey pfennig behamisch; dieselb hab ich Ime für dreyzehen Monat Anzuraitten [...]" (f. 263v). Mattioli, known especially for his Dioscorides commentary, moved to Prague in 1552 as personal physician to Archduke Ferdinand, where he was later to be made head medical advisor to Emperor Maximilian II (cf. Hirsch IV, 168). The volume not only documents salaries, duties, and court expenditures, but also the receipt of border taxes, Turk taxes, tithes, loans, deposits, realties, costs of funerals and the Prague castle vineyard, etc. - Johannes Rabenhaupt von Sucha, the man responsible for this splendid Renaissance account book, was a descendant of an old Bohemian noble family which is also documented in the Palatinate, in Franconia, and in Upper Austria. Although there have been attempts at biographical studies of the Royal bursar Rabenhaupt (without knowledge of the present manuscript), historical science has been forced to admit its temporary failure in this respect (see literature below). - Slight worming to several ff. Some offsetting of ink, but generally very well legible and hardly browned. The finely blindstamped binding shows a wide border of arched friezes; the central compartment bears the ms. title. On the back cover, the friezes frame a roll representing Virtues; central compartment decorated with two parallel arched friezes. Edges, spine-ends, and endpapers with traces of professional restoration; otherwise perfect.
¶ Beket Bukovinská, "Wer war Johann Rabenhaupt? Unbeachtete Aspekte in den Beziehungen zwischen Prag und Südwest-Deutschland", in: Rudolf II, Prague and the World. Papers from the International Conference. Prague, 2-4 September, 1997. Praha, Artefactum - Institute of Art History, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic [1998], p. 89-94.

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The book of the noble science: an illustrated 16th century manuscript manual on astronomy
10

Bonsignorius, Joannes. Il libr[o] [...] dela nobil[e] s[c]ienza.... Probably Northern Italy (or Switzerland?), 1579. Probably Northern Italy (or Switzerland?), 1579. Small folio (185 x 275 mm). Italian manuscript on paper. 154 leaves (including 19 blank leaves, 268 written pages), with one full-page drawing of an armillary sphere in red and black (signed "Jo[annes] Bap[tis]ta Bonsignorius"), 9 subject diagrams and 77 astronomical tables. Italian semi-cursive script in black ink, rubrics and astronomical symbols supplied in red, 24 lines to each page. Bound in 16th century limp vellum with manuscript title to spine ("Manoscritti di Astronomia"). Remains of ties.

EUR 45,000.00

An intriguing, elegantly written and well illustrated handwritten manual about the "noble science of the movements of the planets", forming a detailed display of 16th century astronomical knowledge and all related information available, compiled by an otherwise unrecorded author. Joannes Bonsignorius, likely a member of the Sienese noble Bonsignori family noted for their important role in the history of banking, brings together all the information which a contemporary might need to read the planets and the stars. He begins with explanations of the Metonic cycle, leap years, and ascendants, proceeds to the calculation of new moons and moveable feasts, then expands on the qualities and characteristics of the signs of the zodiac, the influence of the ascendants on each, planetary aspects and their influence on 'air' and climate, lunar and solar eclipses, the planetary houses, triplicity rulers, friend and enemy planets, elaborates on the effects of the planets on the human body (perceived as pain in various body parts) and on the movement of the ascending lunar mode before finally enumerating which countries and cities of the world are ruled by which zodiacal sign (while England, for example, comes under the influence of Aries, Damascus is listed under Leo; Egypt, Babylon and Constantinople are under the sign of Cancer, and Alexandria is said to be ruled by Gemini). - Condition: written on paper assembled from various stocks, showing five different watermarks. While none of them can be positively identified with the specimens illustrated by Briquet, it is interesting to note that they all largely conform to types common among Swiss and Southern German papermills: three show the "Crosse de Bâle" (types: Briquet I, 1313, 1339 & 1357), one shows the griffin-head of Freiburg im Breisgau (type: Briquet I, 2216), and another shows an eagle with an F (type: Briquet I, 154), originating in Frankfurt am Main but used throughout the Rhine Valley and even in the Habsburg provinces. One leaf stained at foot; some light browning; the final leaves of index a bit brown-stained in the outer margins; overall in excellent condition, and in its original first binding. - Provenance: as stated on the first page in the author's own hand, the present manuscript was written in 1579 and dedicated by Bonsignorius to a member of his family named Nicolo. Later in an unidentified European collection (shelfmark "XXII" on front pastedown). Recently acquired from a U.S. private collection.

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The most complete treatise on the art theory, design, and iconography of the Mannerist period
11

Lomazzo, Giovanni Paolo. Trattato dell'arte de la pittura, di Gio. Paolo... Lomazzo milanese pittore. Diviso in sette libri. Ne' quali si contiene tutta la theorica, & la prattica d'essa pittura. Milano, Paolo Gottardo Da Ponte, 1584. Milano, Paolo Gottardo Da Ponte, 1584. 4to. (40), 700 (but: 698), (2) pp. With armorial title woodcut and half-page woodcut portrait on fol. B1. Contemporary full vellum with marbled edges.

EUR 4,000.00

Second edition, the earliest one obtainable and usually considered the first altogether (a single copy of an edition published by Da Ponte in 1582 has been discovered in the Biblioteca della Collegiata S. Pietro Apostolo in Broni near Pavia). The principal work of the Milan artist and theoretician of art, Giampaolo Lomazzo, has been called "the most complete treatise on the art theory, design, and iconography of the Mannerist period" (Arntzen/R.); indeed, "the true Bible of Mannerism" (cf. Schlosser). Purposefully divided into the mystical number of seven books, Lomazzo's treatise describes first proportions (with a discussion of Dürer, who was much-received in Italy), then the expression of feelings, colours, light and shade, linear perspective, and practical painting; the seventh and final book treats matter and substances, touching upon - and greatly expanding on - Armenini. "These last two chapters are of the greatest importance for understanding the essence of Mannerism, providing quite simply one of the most extensive accounts" (ibid.). - Some occasional browning and waterstaining near beginning; slight paper flaw to fol. E3 (not affecting legibility). Numerous errors in pagination; quire Y jumbled but complete. A small perforation to the spine; textblock curled. Old ownership on front flyleaf obliterated in ink. A single copy in German auction records.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 24452 (Var. A). Adams L 1419. BM-STC Italian 391. Cicognara 159. Schlosser 352 Arntzen/Rainwater H 43. Kat. der Ornamentstichslg. Berlin 4612. Chamberlin 2015. Bibl. Trivulziana 261. Cf. Haym, Libri rari 265; Fowler 185 (1585 ed.).

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Jesuit Theatre
12

Lauther, Christoph, Jesuit priest (b. 1561). Josippi comedia. [Lucerne, ca. 1588]. [Lucerne, ca. 1588]. 4to (165 x 197 mm). Latin manuscript on paper in an elegant scribal hand, titles in red; written space ruled at right and left in red and blue ink. (2), 138 pp., final blank leaf. 19th-century half morocco.

EUR 28,000.00

The only known source for this 16th-century Biblical comedy written by Father Christoph Laut(h)er of the Jesuit College of Lucerne; According to the contemporary annotations on the title page, the play - a dramatic poem in five acts which takes as its subject the Old Testament story of Joseph - was first performed at Michaelmas, 1588 in Lucerne's fish market before the papal nuncio and other notables; the character of the Pharaoh scattered coins - both real and fake, the latter made of lead - amongst the crowd. Indeed, one of the final acts is entitled "Distributio proemiorum: Rex Pharao nummos distribuet, Regina sexta ex floribus". Here, Pharaoh first makes a little speech in verse; then the prizes are distributed to each class of the Jesuit school, the king and the queen each pronouncing a distich. - Jesuit drama was practised in the colleges of the Society of Jesus between the 16th and 18th centuries as a way of instructing both students and audience in correct language use and oratory skills, assimilating Christian values, and imparting Catholic doctrine. The increasingly elaborately produced plays were therefore based on accounts from the Bible or saintly legends, often including musical elements and sometimes even ballet. The author of this play, Christoph Lauther, joined the Jesuits in 1579: after studying rhetoric and philosophy at Ingolstadt, he is recorded at the Jesuit College in Lucerne, one of the most important houses of the Order in Switzerland, between 1585 and 1590 as a professor of rhetoric (cf. De Backer/Sommervogel). - 19th century notes on Christoph Lauther on the second flyleaf. Provenance: Ittingen Charterhouse in Thurgau, Switzerland (17th-century ownership inscription: "Cartusia Ittingensis"); later bookstamp of the Jesuits, Germany Province: "Dom. Script. Prov. Germ. S.J." (this is the manuscript described by Sommervogel: "Ce MS. d'une belle écriture est aux Archives de la province de Germanie").
¶ De Backer/Sommervogel IX, 577 (this copy).

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An unpublished manuscript travelogue to the Middle East, with 29 original drawings
13

Gianni, Vittorio. Notizie, ed aventure veridiche di un viaggio intrapreso... da una persona di condizione privata [...] di Urbino [...], sino a Costantinopoli; e del ritorno suo [...]. Middle East, 1769-1770. Middle East, 1769-1770. Folio (235 x 170 mm). Italian manuscript in two parts with 29 original pen and ink drawings (15 and 14), written in black ink in a neat, legible hand, 28 lines to a page. (1), 95, (1) pp. (including illustrations numbered in pencil, upper right, but recto only). Collation, including illustrations: [1 f., 1 p.], [21 ff., 35 pp.], [6 pp.], [17 ff., 26 pp.], [5 pp.] (several sheets cut so that a tab only remains of the second page, and all illustrations tipped in). Contemp. half vellum over marbled paper boards. Generally written on both recto and verso, except for the two title-pages and the illustrations (recto only); all but first and last page enclosed with a single line border, in pencil for text pages and in ink for illustrations.

EUR 75,000.00

Unpublished manuscript giving a vivid and event-filled first person account of a journey from Urbino to Constantinople, well legible and beautifully presented with 29 equally unique pen-and-ink illustrations. - A unique account of a journey from Urbino to Constantinople and back, in 1769-70, hand-written and accompanied by 29 original drawings, which offer views of islands rarely if ever depicted in contemporary travel accounts or series. No counterpart has been found for the illustrations, which appear to have been prepared from eye-witness records. That the artist may have been the author himself is suggested by the fact that he makes no mention of a separate artist, and by the manner in which he introduces the first illustration: 'Il Paise è piccolo come vedrassi della figura, che di curiosita, ed intelligenza di lettori porro a piedi di questo capitolo' (p. 5v). The story of his adventure is equally idiosyncratic, incorporating both a record of foreign places, people and customs common to other such literature, and also an account of a personal tragedy and a dangerous sea-voyage. The manuscript falls within a tradition of cultural exchange and travel writing between Europeans and the Orient; but unlike Luigi Mayer, for example, employed to make drawings of the historical buildings of Constantinople by the English ambassador Sir Robert Ainslie shortly afterwards, or J. B. Hilair, whose paintings made on a trip throughout the Empire with the French ambassador Count Choiseul-Gouffier in 1776, and engraved and published in Gouffier's "Voyage pittoresque de la Grèce" (1778-82), Gianni appears to be an entirely independent figure. Though the manuscript is set out like a printed book and was presumably destined for wider distribution in that form as a money-making enterprise, Gianni does not seem to have been commissioned, nor to have hoped for patronage. His stated aim is simply to give a true account to his readers, in case they might wish to undertake a similar journey. His route takes him through great cities such as Venice, Athens, Smyrna and Gallipoli, ancient sites such as Troy and Heraklia, through the Peloponnesus and islands such as Mykonos, Corfu, Maitos and Skios, all of which he describes and depicts in detail. Meanwhile, although he says that he is not writing in order to leave "una viva ricordanza di me, come di soggetto qualificato", that is precisely what he does: the second part of the book recounts his search for his son from whom he had heard nothing but that he had married a Greek girl. Reunited with him through a doctor who has been helping the boy through an illness, he tries to persuade the young couple to return with him to Urbino, but this plan is thwarted by the machinations of the doctor. His journey home, alone, is enlivened by an encounter with corsairs, a near shipwreck, a boy falling overboard and a violent storm. The value of this book lies not only in the unique, unpublished text and illustrations, and legible and attractive presentation, but also in the combination of commonly-found themes such as dress and customs, with an entirely personal and richly-told narrative of one man's search for his son. - One illustration (Smirne) has been trimmed along the right edge after having been bound in. Etched armorial bookplate of an unidentified noble bishop on front pastedown.

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The First Anatomical Atlas in the Islamic World
14

[Mansur bin Muhammad bin Ahmad bin Yusuf bin Faqir Ilyas]. Tashrih-i badan insan [The Anatomy of the Human... Body, or "Mansur's Anatomy"]. Persia, 19th century. 4to (173 x 210 mm). Persian manuscript on paper, 73 leaves, 17 lines to the page written in nasta'liq script in black ink. With 7 diagrams of the human body in watercolour and ink. Contemporary blindstamped red morocco.

EUR 18,000.00

A manuscript of the author's principal work, the "Tashrih-i badan insan": the first coloured atlas of the human body, the achievement for which the early 15th century Persian physician Mansur from Shiraz, Timurid Persia, is best known. The seven diagrams illustrate the skeletal and the nervous system, the muscles, arteries, veins, and an embryo in the womb. While Mansur's "Anatomy" was not the first notation of the human body, it is considered the first colour atlas ever created. It led to a substantial change in the contemporary Islamic perception of human anatomy, as such an atlas had previously been considered contrary to Islamic law. Mansur is also credited with one of the earliest anatomical sketches of a pregnant woman: while his other illustrations are likely inspired by earlier Latin and Greek writings, the pregnant woman is considered an original work. - Binding stained and chafed, inner hinges reinforced or broken. Occasional chipping to edges. An appealing manuscript.

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To the famous black French opera soprano
15

Spontini, Gaspare. La Vestale. Tragédie lyrique en Trois Actes de... Mr. Jouy [...] Dédiée à Sa Majesté l'Impératrice et Reine. Paris, Erard, [1807-1808]. Paris, Erard, [1807-1808]. Folio (274 x 350 mm). Title leaf, dedication leaf, 511 pp., engraved throughout. Original red morocco dedication binding with ornamental gilt spine and borders, giltstamped title and ornaments to covers. Gilt inner dentelle; leading egdes gilt. Blue silk endpapers.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition of Spontini's most important and best-known opera. A superb copy, bound in sumptuous red morocco and decorated in the Empire Style, dedicated by the composer to Caroline Branchu, the famous black French opera soprano who played the title role of the young vestal at the première on 15 December 1807. The gilt title on the upper cover reads "Hommage d'Amitié / à Madame Branchu / par G. Spontini" and on the lower cover, below the monogram "CB": "De tout ce que je dois / Aux charmes de votre art / N'attendez pas que je convienne / Si vous acceptez votre part / Vous diminueriez trop la mienne". "La Vestale" was very well received and instantly achieved the status of a masterpiece. - Rose Timoléone Caroline Branchu, née Caroline Chevalier de Lavit (1780-1850) was born in Haiti, then the French colony of Saint-Domingue. Of mixed white and black ancestry, she was educated at the Paris Conservatory from the age of 16. As a singer attached to the royal court she is said to have been the mistress of Napoléon I. - Some foxing and staining, imperceptible repairs to binding. Latterly in the collection of Pierre Bergé (his bookplate on the pastedown).

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One of 325 copies
16

Forbin, Louis Nicolas Philippe Auguste. Voyage dans le Levant en 1817 et 1818. Paris, de l'Imprimerie Royale, 1819. Paris, de l'Imprimerie Royale, 1819. Text vol. in 8vo and atlas in folio (670 x 503 mm). (4), 460 pp. (4), 65 pp. Half-titles in both vols.; 80 lithographed, sepia aquatint or engraved plates and plans, the 8 fine aquatints by Debucourt after Forbin, the lithographed subjects for G. Engelmann after Lecomte, Deseynes, Castellan, Carle, and Horace Vernet, Fragonard, Thiénon, Legros, Isabey and others, large folding engraved plan at the end of text vol. 19th century marbled half calf with giltstamped title to gilt spine.

EUR 35,000.00

First edition. Only 325 copies of this work were produced. "Forbin's was one of the first important French books to use lithography on a grand scale, and the standard of production is equal to that of Napoléon's 'Description de l'Egypte' or Denon's 'Voyage'" (Navari, Blackmer). Forbin succeeded Denon as director of museums in 1816 and was authorised to purchase antiquities for the Louvre (his son-in-law, Marcellus, expedited the acquisition of the recently discovered Venus de Milo). In August 1817 he began a year-long journey to the Levant accompanied by the artist Pierre Prévost and the engineer de Bellefonds. His journey took him to Melos, Athens, Constantinople, Smyrna, Ephesus, Acre, Jaffa, Jerusalem, Cairo, Luxor, and Thebes. - This set includes the frequently lacking 8vo text volume: this has the plan of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre bound at the end with a list of plates which were sold separately. The atlas volume repeats the text (entirely reset in-folio, sometimes found in a separate folio volume) and includes the magnificent, highly desirable plates (after Carle Vernet, Fragonard, Isabey, and Forbin himself, as well as Prevost), which show fine views of Greece, the Dead Sea, Jerusalem, Ramla, Gaza, and Egypt. - Occasional slight foxing, still a splendid copy from the library of the Ducs de Luynes at the Château de Dampierre: their bookplate reproducing the arms of Charles Marie d'Albert de Luynes (1783-1839), 7th Duc de Luynes, on pastedown. The Aboussouan copy (comprising both the folio and the octavo volume) commanded £20,000 at Sotheby's in 1993, while in 2002 the Atabey copy of the folio volume alone fetched £22,000.
¶ Atabey 447f. Blackmer 614. Aboussouan 338. Weber I, 68-70. Röhricht 1660. Tobler 144f. Colas 1089. Hiler 321. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 163. Brunet II, 1337. Graesse II, 614. Cf. Lipperheide Ma 16 (2nd ed.).

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One of the earliest Turkish medical works to draw on Paracelsian science
17

Sani-zade Mehmed Ataullah. [Hamse-i Sani-zade]. Kostantiniye (Istanbul), Tabhane-yi Sahane / Dar üt-Tibaat ül-Amire (Imperial School of Medicine), 1235 AH [= 1820 AD]. Kostantiniye (Istanbul), Tabhane-yi Sahane / Dar üt-Tibaat ül-Amire (Imperial School of Medicine), 1235 AH [= 1820 AD]. Folio (208 x 289 mm). 3 parts in 1 volume: 4 pp. of prelims (blank, alif, ba, gim); 131, (1 blank) pp. and 35, (1 blank) pp. (bound alternately), with 56 etched plates; 39, (1 blank) pp.; 283, (1 blank) pp. Contemp. half calf with gilstamped spine and marbled covers.

EUR 48,000.00

First edition of the pioneering Ottoman physician Sanizade's (1771-1826) medical compendium: the first three books (on anatomy, physiology, and internal medicine) of what would later be known as "Sani-zade's Canon of Five", "Kitâb ül-evvel fi t-tesrihât" ("Mir'âtül-ebdân fî tesrih-i a'zâil-insân"), "Kitab üs-sânî fi 't-tabîyat", and "Kitâb üs-sâlis Miyâr ül-etibbâ". This was one of the earliest Turkish medical works to draw thoroughly on western, Paracelsian science: indeed, it is modelled on and partly translated from Italian and German sources, such as Anton Störck, Bartolomeo Eustachi, Gabriele Fallopio, and Costanzo Varolio, reproducing anatomical illustrations from a variety of sources including Vesalius. - "[B]y and large Ottoman medicine remained [...] attached to its Galenic roots. [...] Real paradigmatic change began to appear only with the upheavals of 19th-century reforms, when translations and adaptations of new European knowledge made their way to the core of the medical profession. One of the first books to spark this revolution was Ataullah Sanizade's compendium 'Hamse-i sanizade', a series of five books published in Ottoman Turkish from 1820 onward, incorporating new medical knowledge from Europe. Sanizade was a brilliant and innovative physician and theorist (as well as musician, astronomer, and historian) who did much to integrate new medical knowledge with the old. His views on medicine encountered much opposition, mainly because of his support for surgery-based study of anatomy. As a result his request to dedicate his chef d'oeuvre to Sultan Mahmud II was denied. In time, however, the compendium came to replace the earlier canonic texts, and was fondly named 'kanun-i sanizade' (Sanizade's canon), referring, of course, to the old master's 'Qanun'. Although the compendium formally adhered to the humoral system and other concepts of ancient medicine, it was here that blood circulation was mentioned for the first time as a scientific concept and as part of a different medical theory. Some of the terminology included in this book formed the basis for a new medical profession that was beginning to take shape" (D. Ze'evi, Producing Desire [2006], p. 20f.). A five-volume Arabic edition appeared at Bulaq in 1828 by direct order of Mehmet Ali. - Part 1 bound as follows (agreeing with the copy in the BSB Munich): 4 pp. of prelims (blank, alif, ba, gim); 3, (1) pp., (2 plates), 2 pp. [index], 5-34 pp., (17 plates), 3-22 pp. [index], 35-68 pp., (9 plates), 23-35 pp. [index; pp. 25-28 numbered 3-6 in error], 1 bl. p., 69-94 pp., (12 plates), 37-48 pp. [index], 95-100 pp., (6 plates), 49-55 pp. [index], 1 bl. p., 101-106 pp., (3 plates), 57-60 pp. [index], 107-120 pp., (5 plates), 61-70 pp. [index], 121-128 pp., (2 plates), 71-80 pp. [index], 129-131 pp., 1 bl. p. Some dampstaining throughout, more prominently so in several plates. In all, a good copy of this rare work, the only edition published during the author's lifetime.
¶ OCLC 608102180.

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Journal of an expedition by a pioneering Egyptologist, illustrating hundreds of hieroglyphs
18

Vaucelle de Ravigny, Louis de. Journal de voyage en Egypte et en Nubie... 1826. Autograph manuscript signed. Egypt, 1826. Egypt, 1826. 4to (235 x 185 mm). 177 pp. Contemporary wrappers (wanting spine). Ms. title and name on front cover.

EUR 85,000.00

An early 19th century egyptologist's fascinating travel notes documenting his journey through the Nile valley, profusely illustrated with more than 230 sketches showing hieroglyphs and Greek and Coptic inscriptions. At the age of 27, Louis Vaucelle (1798-1851) undertook an expedition to Egypt to explore the banks of the Nile from Cairo to Aswan. He set out from Marseille on 27 January 1826 and reached the second cataract on 27 May. In his journal he accurately reproduces all cartouches and inscriptions of the temples, tombs and palaces visited up to the first cataract south of Aswan. He gives the condition of monuments (sometimes mere ruins), identifies traces of Christian chapels and churches, translates hieroglyphs dedicated both to pharaohs and Roman emperors, indicates (in cursive script) several Arabic words and names, and mentions the orientalists who preceded him: his mentor Champollion as well as Denon, Maillé, Belzoni, and Niebuhr. Among the temples and sites he describes are Ipsamboul, Edfu, Dakka ("un des mieux conservés"), Thèbes ("Louqsor"), Karnak, Denderah Assouan, Elephantine and Philae as well as the pyramids of Giza, Cleopatra's Needle, the Sphinx (the head of which is said to be "extrêmement mutilée"), Alexandria, and the Nile Delta. The final fifty-odd pages are devoted to contemporary Egyptian cities, their people, and their Arab, Jewish and Coptic traditions. As Vaucelle notes, Coptic Christians are free to practice their religion due to the unrivalled tolerance of the Muslim faith ("tant il est vrai qu’il n’y a pas de religion plus tolérante que la religion mahométane"). He also provides details of medical operations such as castration, circumcision, and excision, as well as of the "Kalisch" festivities held in Cairo at the time of the opening of the dikes. - Louis de Vaucelles de Ravigny was trained by Jean-François Champollion, who in 1824 published his "Précis du système hiéroglyphique des anciens Égyptiens". Apart from the present travel journal he also produced a "Chronologie des monuments antiques de la Nubie" (1829), based on the interpretation of the royal legends contained in the hieroglyphic reliefs, a book in which he pays tribute to the German egyptologist François-Christian Gau. - Slight fraying to edges; wants wrappers' spine. A fine survival.

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Das Kapital, Marxism, the First International, Anarchism, Utopian Socialism, Fourierism, the Commune, the Dreyfus Affair
19

Keller, Charles, French socialist and anarchist (1843-1913). The socialist library of Charles Keller. Paris, Geneva, Bruxelles and other places, 1833-1908. Paris, Geneva, Bruxelles and other places, 1833-1908. A collection of 83 works in 35 volumes. Mostly 8vo.

EUR 485,000.00

A large, wide-ranging collection of extremely rare, early Marxist, socialist, and anarchist publications, forming the private library of the Alsatian engineer and socialist Charles Keller, best known for beginning (though not completing) the first French translation of Marx's "Kapital". Indeed, the collection includes Keller's personal copy of the 1867 German first edition, with his characteristic red and blue pencil markings and occasional translator's annotations in the margins. His library is rich in works on the International Workingmen's Association (the "First International"), of whose Paris section Keller was a member; he participated as a delegate in the Second Congress of the League of Peace and Freedom at Berne. Keller's library includes a considerable number of excessively rare socialist pamphlets from the 1840s to 1870s (some inscribed to him), spanning the periods of the Second Republic and the Second Empire. They include many works of utopian socialism, Fourierism, and Proudhonism, but also anarchist works and the first published account of Devil's Island. In 1871, Keller was a member of the Paris Commune, the writings of which constitute another important focus of his collection. After being injured fighting on the barricades, he escaped to Basel. Keller had been an early associate of Elie Reclus and Mikhail Bakunin, and it is little surprise that when the conflict between anarchist and Marxist factions in the IWA came to a head after the fall of the Commune, ending in a schism between the two wings at the 1872 Hague Congress, it was the Bakunist, anti-Marxist faction with which Keller sided. This "anarchist" First International of St. Imier based itself in Jura, Switzerland, where Keller took exile, establishing himself as a writer of workers' songs. His song "Le droit du travailleur" (also known as "La Alsacienne" or "La Jurassienne"), published in 1874, became highly popular with its forceful refrain: "Ouvrier, prends la machine, / Prends la terre, paysan!" (Nettlau, p. 61). Keller eventually returned to France after the amnesty of 1880, settling in Nancy, where he continued his work as a songwriter and poet under the pseudonym "Jacques Turbin". His ongoing interest in political radicalism and the social upheavals of the Third Republic is obvious from his library's numerous anarchist and socialist publications from the 1890s and early 1900s, including several works on the Dreyfus affair. It may be telling of Keller's personal charm that in spite of his Bakunist apostasy he managed to remain on good terms with the Marx family (cf. J.-P. Lefebvre, "La première traduction française du Capital", in: La Pensée 233 [May/June 1983], pp. 85-99, at p. 87). - Most bindings rather rubbed with some chipping to wrappers, but well-preserved on the whole. Some items with Keller's signature on the cover or author's inscription; many with Keller's markings and annotations, providing a rare opportunity to glimpse authentic examples of what Bertolt Brecht famously termed "Questions of a Worker Who Reads". - Detailed individual descriptions are available upon request.

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"to establish a general theory of the geomagnetic field deserving of the name"
20

Gauß, Carl Friedrich, German mathematician (1777-1855). 4 autograph letters signed. Göttingen, 1836 to 1849. Göttingen, 1836 to 1849. 25 Jan. 1836. 2 pp. Large 4to. - 27 Feb. 1839. 2 pp. Large 4to. - 28 Dec. 1841. 3½ pp. 8vo. - 6 Jan. 1849. 3 pp. Large 4to (altogether 10½ pp.). All written on bifolia; the first two letters bear seals with the autograph address on the reverse of the counter-leaf.

EUR 65,000.00

Collection of four long, unpublished letters spanning more than a decade, all to the Berlin physicist and geologist Georg Adolf Erman (1806-77), who had returned from a long voyage around the world and was in the process of publishing his findings ("Reise um die Welt durch Nordasien und die beiden Oceane", 5 vols. of history [1833-42] and 2 vols. of physics [1835-41, with atlas]). Gauss was able to draw on Erman's empirical observations about earth's magnetic field. All four letters begin with thanks for gifts sent by Erman, then develop into extensive scientific discussions which even touch upon Gauss's thermogalvanic experiments. Also, Gauss mentions his attempts to obtain books of Russian fiction. - In 1836 Gauss thanks Erman for presenting him with the 2nd part of his "Reise um die Erde" ("Ortsbestimmungen und Declinationsbeobachtungen auf dem festen Lande"): "This work contains a great wealth of facts. I am particularly interested in your magnetic observations and therefore am glad that you decided to include in this early volume your compass declinations with their results. These, in connection with other observations, will serve to supply the gap left by Barlow's map of declinations [...] But now I dearly look forward to the publication of the second part which is to contain the intensities and inclination readings. Hopefully we will then soon possess a general map for the horizontal intensity, which is devoutly to be wished. Indeed, as things stand now, the entire intensity in most cases is to be conceived merely as a unit of calculation at which one cannot directly arrive with any degree of precision, but which is a mere function of immediately observable elements, such as one rarely will find together in a single place, and even more rarely with the same degree of reliability; and, even more importantly, there are precious few occasions on which the entire intensity will be of any use at all; what is really needed are those very separate elements themselves. To arrange the three coordinates in such a fashion that one of them represents the whole intensity would seem to me, considering the present state of affairs, like wanting to draw up a star index in longitude and latitude only, omitting right ascension and declination. Indeed, at close examination even this comparison proves misleading, as an astronomer ultimately needs latitudes and longitudes for planets and comets so as to establish a general theory, whereas to establish a general theory of the geomagnetic field deserving of the name it is indispensable to disassemble the whole intensity back into its components. To be sure, this statement, which you must not take as an off-handed remark but rather as the result of long and thorough deliberation, cannot possibly be explained in a letter, but this much I can add: that I am fully satisfied as to the method by which the establishment of an exhausting General Theory is to be attacked [...] You may be interested to learn that our recent thermogalvanic experiments have already succeeded in so amplifying an electric current that it is capable of setting even the 25 pound rods in violent motion after passing through a wire of a mile's length [...]". - In 1839 Gauss thanks for a "postcard from Kamchatka" and for the "full communication of Erman's declination readings": "I will be most happy soon to receive also the corrected data of your intensities, although there is no hurry about that. I am merely making mention of a few of your observations in an article intended for the 3rd part of the Findings of the Magnetic Society, the first sheet of which is now in the press. Should your corrected calculations for these 16 locations [followed by a table of 16 cities, including St Petersburg, Kazan, Moscow, San Francisco, and Rio de Janeiro] have yielded intensity readings departing from those published by Major Sabine, I would be able to include these changes in the proofs of the said article [...] According to the most recent news I received from England, our hopes that the government there might do something splendid for the study of the geomagnetic field have suffered a severe blow; but this is not for want of the scholars' diligence, and no blame can be attached to them if the government fails to act [...]". - In late 1841 Gauss thanks for the gift of the 2nd volume of "Reise um die Erde" ("Inclinationen und Intensitäten, Declinationsbeobachtungen auf der See. Periodische Declinationsveränderungen"): "Regarding your observations I can only agree with Sabine's judgment that they contain the most substantial and valuable contribution to the knowledge of magnetism ever made by anybody. It gives me pleasure to see that the new reduction of intensity readings for Tahiti differs considerably from the earlier one, approaching that of Fitz Roy, and nearly duplicating that of Belcher. The large difference, according to Sabine, is mainly due to local interferences [...] I am much pleased with your plans for a journal aiming at acquainting us with Russia's literary productions, the more so because I myself during the past year or two have begun to study the Russian language and find this occupation most agreeable entertainment. The only thing that rather spoils this hobby for me is the difficulty in obtaining Russian books [...] However, l'Appetit vient en mangeant, and in particular I should like to have more in the way of belles lettres. My fiction department so far is limited to Krylov's Fables, a few volumes of Pushkin, and the complete collection of the writings of your Yakutian friend Bestuyev-Martinsky. All my endeavors to obtain something through the German booksellers have been in vain; a single shop did not refuse me outright, but demanded, apart from other onerous conditions (such as that one must accept the shipment regardless of when it arrives, and whatever the charge), the absolutely precise titles of the books ordered [...]". - In 1849 Gauss thanks Erman for sending him various works, including the "3rd volume of the historical section of your travel account", and criticises an article that appeared in the "Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science": "Observations all made from points upon or near a single line encircling the earth are quite as hopeless for such a purpose as would be the attempt to determine all the lunar elements and equations from the observations of a single week, even if they were made continuously from a hundred observatories. One might go even further and say that, to a degree, the observation data must not only encompass most of the earth's surface, but must also be more or less evenly distributed across the same [...] Altogether, the correction of my constants will certainly prove a tough nut to crack (for posterity), one that will turn out to be harder than the teeth of many a coming scientist [...]". - Clean and well-preserved throughout. Three letters are written in neat Latin handwriting, while that of 1841 is in German script, written somewhat overly carefully at first, then becoming more and more fluent and finally descending into a rather loose style.

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The Foundation of Protectionist Trade
21

List, Friedrich. Das nationale System der politischen Oekonomie. Erster Band... [all published]: Der internationale Handel, die Handelspolitik und der deutsche Zollverein. Tübingen, J. G. Cotta'scher Verlag, 1841. Tübingen, J. G. Cotta'scher Verlag, 1841. 8vo. LXVIII, (2 table of contents, verso also numbered LXVIII), 589 pp., including 2 title pages. Contemporary half cloth, gilt back, marbled sides.

EUR 8,500.00

Fist edition. Friedrich List's seminal advocacy of economic nationalism, derived from the nationalist and romantic ideas of Alexander Hamilton and Adam Müller, from whom List also adopted his opposition against the ideas of Adam Smith. List considered the principle of free trade detrimental to the national interest, to which the immediate interests of groups and individuals should be submitted. To List the nation was an entity whose aim is not the creation of wealth by international exchange, but the development of its own economic and productive sources. "These views coincided so exactly with the reawakening of German nationalism that List's book caused a great sensation when it was published, and it remained for seventy years the theoretic gospel of the advocates of protectionist tariffs in Germany, Britain and the United States" (PMM). - Binding a little rubbed. Tiny defect in inner margin of title leaves, usual mild browning throughout, a few leaves with a heavier, mostly small brown stain in lower inner and outer margins. A good copy.
¶ Kress C.5545. PMM 311.

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Carl Rahl and the Ponte Molle Society
22

[Glanz, Joseph, Austrian medalist and picture caster (1795-1866)]. Erinnerung an Rom und meine Freunde. Friendship album... containing 28 entries (mostly by members of the "Ponte Molle Society"). Rome, 1843. Rome, 1843. 8vo. 112, (4) pp. with colour-printed or blindstamped decorative borders. Contemporary full calf.

EUR 3,500.00

Glanz probably assembled the present album on the occasion of a visit to the German artists' association "Ponte Molle Society" on 18 March 1843. The Society, a humorous artists' club based at the Palazzo Serlupi near the Pantheon, was a popular venue for German artists and Rome travellers, offering art exhibitions, events, and a well-stocked library. In 1845 it metamorphosed into the more serious-minded "Deutscher Künstlerverein". The most prominent contributor to this album is the Viennese painter and engraver Carl Rahl (1812-65), who had been living in Rome since 1836 and was closely involved with the Ponte Molle Society, serving as its "People's Tribune" in 1840/41. After his return to Vienna in 1850, Rahl became professor at the academy. A precursor to Makart, he championed a drastic and colourful eclecticism which exerted an enormous influence on the painters of Vienna's Ringstrasse era (cf. Thieme/Becker XXVII, 570). Glanz, the owner of the album, is identified in the full-page entry of Johann Christian Reinhart (p. 97; Rome, 25 March 1843): "At the same time, dear Mr. Glanz, I wish you a happy and enjoyable journey" (transl.). - The contributors are, in the order of their entries: 1) Alexius Fedor Geyer (Berlin); 2) Adam Bamelmayr; 3) Friedrich Strache (Vienna); 4) Robert Salemann (Reval); 5) Heinrich Wilhelm (Heidelberg); 6) Eduard Schwab (Mähren); 7) Ivanoff (St Petersburg); 8) Peter Petersen (Copenhagen); 9) Alexandre Reuben (Paris); 10) Christian Friderik Holbeck (Copenhagen); 11) Carl Mayer (Vienna); 12) Hermann Schievelbein (Berlin); 13) Peter Raadfig (Copenhagen); 14) Carl Adolf Senff (Halle); 15) Gustav W. Palm (Stockholm); 16) Wilhelm Achtermann (Prussia); 17) Constantin Schmidt (Mainz/Rhein); 18) Carl Rahl; 19) Theodor Naphtali (Berlin); 20) Wilhelm Matthiae; 21) Louis Vogel (Hildburghausen); 22) J. M. Scharff (Hütteldorf near Vienna); 23) Adolf Dressler (Berlin); 24) Jan Thienen; 25) (pseud.) "Caspar Hauser" (Basel); 26) Wilhelm Seiffert (Wroclaw); 27) Heinrich Im Hof (Uri). - Spine and front hinge professionally repaired; slight brownstaining to interior fleckig.

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Benthamite Prison Models
23

Sagra, Ramon de la. Atlas carcelario ó coleccion de laminas de las... principales carceles de Europa y de América, proyectos de construccion, carruages y objetos de uso frecuente en las prisiones. Primera y segunda serie que contienen las carceles modelos para la Francia, y las construidas en Inglaterra, Escocia, Suiza y Belgica. Madrid, imprenta del Colegio de Sordo-Mudos y Ciegos, 1843. Madrid, imprenta del Colegio de Sordo-Mudos y Ciegos, 1843. Folio (247 x 400 mm). Title, (2) pp. of index, and 39 lithographed folding leaves (mostly signed by A. Blouet or Harou-Romain, lithographed by G. Schatter). Contemporary blue boards with original printed wrappers trimmed and laid down to covers.

EUR 3,500.00

First and only edition. - A rare atlas with ground plans and front and side views of projected and existing prisons in France, England and other countries, including fine plates of treadmills and similar machines for "labour of the hardest and most servile kind". The designs show "quasi-Benthamite architectural cellular models [...] A compilation of penal architectural plans stemming from Sagra's 1835 tour of the principal ultilitarian model prisons in the United States, as well as some in Western Europe" (Santiago-Valles, Penal Forms, in: McCoy/Scarano [eds.], Colonial Crucible [2009], p. 87-94, at p. 90). A first series of 25 plates contains sketches for numerous different designs for buildings for cellular confinement, usually a ground plan on one leaf and profile views on the next. Most are identified only as "provincial prisons" with between 12 and 126 cells, some of them dome-shaped; three others are identified as projects for prisons for the cities of Caen, Madrid and Rome. The second series of 14 plates shows penitentiary institutions mostly in England and Scotland: ground plans of the Westminster and Millbank prisons, the treadmill in Gloucester, a "tread-hand-wheel" in Petworth, crank-mill (constructed by Richmond & Son Engineers, Chelmsford) with an ergometer, plan for a prison with 284 cells by John Sibly, chapel-shaped cellular prison, Edinburgh and Glasgow Bridewell, and prisons in Geneva, Lausanne and Ghent. - Sagra was a member of the Spanish Cortes, now best remembered for his important works on the history of Cuba. He lived in Paris for a time and made extensive travels through Europe to investigate the condition of charitable institutions and the penal systems in these countries. - The additional plates announced on the lower cover never appeared. An octavo text volume (104 pp.) issued the same year is not present here. - Spine corners worn. Stamp of a 19th century Dutch prison reform library to title ("Nederlandsch Genootschap tot Zedelijke Verbetering der Gevangenen, Hoofdbestuur"). A slight waterstain to the letterpress preliminaries. Printed on thin but strong paper, in fine condition.
¶ Sabin 74906.

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One of 125 copies
24

Lanci, Michelangelo. Trattato delle Simboliche rappresentanze arabiche. Paris, dalla Stamperia orientale di Dondey-Dupré, 1845-1846. Paris, dalla Stamperia orientale di Dondey-Dupré, 1845-1846. Small folio. 3 vols. (2 vols. of text and 1 plate vol.). 288 pp. 256 pp. 64 plates. Contemp. half calf on raised bands, red morocco spine labels, black volume numbers. Marbled endpapers.

EUR 35,000.00

First edition, one of 125 copies. - The learned Italian abbot and orientalist Michele Angelo Lanci (1779-1867) taught Arabic at the Sapienza in Rome. For his "Trattato", Lanci studied Islamic artefacts such as the famous "Vaso Vescovali" (now in the British Museum), of which he provided the first scholarly account. Includes engravings of inscriptions on talismans, amulets, arms and armour, metalwares and textiles. - Some foxing. From the library of the Ducs de Luynes at the Château de Dampierre: their bookplate reproducing the arms of Charles Marie d'Albert de Luynes (1783-1839), 7th Duc de Luynes, on pastedown. - Of the utmost rarity, no copies recorded at auctions since decades. No copies in the US.
¶ ICCU UBO3282249. OCLC 41653985. Cf. Gay 2094. Brunet III, 809. Graesse IV, 93 (1846 ed.).

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European anatomical illustration introduced to Persian medicine
25

Mirza Mohammad Vali. [In Arabic script: cheragh haa rewshenaaa der asewl... pezeshekea = Illumination of the fundamentals of medicine]. Tabriz (Iran), dar al-Tabae [State Printing Office], 1271 AH [= 1854/55]. Tabriz (Iran), dar al-Tabae [State Printing Office], 1271 AH [= 1854/55]. Folio (340 x 210 mm). [1],"194" [= 195], 108 [+ 4 blanks]; "240" [= 280]; [1], 5, 10 pp. A wholly lithographed book in nashk Arabic script, with 3 title-pages (all with decorative borders, the 1st and 3rd with elaborate floral and arabesque decoration), 56 lithographed anatomical illustration plates, a page of floral and arabesque decoration serving as a divisional "title" with almost no text, and the 1st and 2nd title-pages each followed by 2 text pages with elaborate floral and arabesque borders, the first page headed by the crowned Iranian emblem (a lion passant guardant, holding a sword in his right paw, with the sun issuant). Contemporary light brown goatskin, each board with blind single and double fillets forming a panel design, with 3 lozenge-shaped white parchment inlays with arabesque and floral decoration (a large one in the centre and a smaller one above and below), yellow paste-downs with a lithographed panel of elaborate arabesque and floral decoration.

EUR 48,500.00

Very rare first (and only?) edition of an extensive Persian-language medical handbook by Mirza Mohammad-Vali, chief physician of the army under the fourth Qajar Shah, Nasar al-Din (reigned 1848-1896). It is a pioneering work of Iranian printing, which introduced European anatomical illustration to Persian physicians and helped to promote the study of European medicine, primarily in the army. While the book provides a broad introduction to medicine in general, its most remarkable feature is the collection of anatomical illustrations: 56 lithographed plates showing human skeletons and bones; muscles, tendons and ligaments; internal organs (male and female); and the respiratory, nervous and circulatory systems. They are based on European models such as Vesalius, Scarpa and Fabrici. For centuries Arabic medicine had been more advanced than that in Europe in many respects, so that European advances in the Renaissance were heavily dependent on the study and translation of Ibn Sina (Avicenna) and other ancient Arabic sources. But European advances in anatomy and surgery had proved their benefits in treating shrapnel and gunshot wounds, and European doctors and public health officials were learning to reign in infectious diseases that proved a growing problem in Iran, especially in the modern cities where the greater mobility of domestic and foreign travellers met crowded conditions and sanitary facilities that were no longer able cope. So with growing contacts between Persia and Europe, and with the Persian army increasingly facing and using European artillery in the course of the 19th-century, the government and army became important adherents of the study of European medicine. When the government established the Dal al-Fonun (ancestor of the University of Tehran) in 1851 it included a medical school to train army physicians. Mirza Mohammad-Vali, a physician in the Royal Persian Regiment, was appointed 'hakimbáshiye nezâm (chief physician of the army) by the Shah in 1852. While European missionaries and the Armenian city of New Julfa outside Isfahan had introduced letterpress printing to Iran in the 17th century, efforts to print the connected Arabic script needed to reach an Arabic- or Persian-speaking audience had failed to overcome the technical, economic and linguistic obstacles. Lithographic printing was introduced to Persia at Tabriz in 1821, but matured only in the course of the 1840s, which saw the first extensively illustrated books. The lower capital investment of lithographic production, and the fact that it could more easily render the Arabic scripts in various styles, lead to its dominance for several decades. The present book reflects the growing European influence not only in the illustrations, but also in the decoration. While it uses many traditional Arabic or Persian conventions of layout and ornament, the decorations mix traditional Islamic arabesques with similar designs using less stylized floral motifs that appear to derive from European sources. The Iranian emblem, a sort of coat of arms for the Persian state, may also reflect European influences. Its design had been revised under the second Shah of the Qajar dynasty, Fath-Ali (reigned 1797-1834) and it was apparently at that time that the crown shown here was added. The book has five series of page numbers. Fully fledged title-pages introduce series 1 and 4, but the other one appears near the end of series 3, on its p. 235. Series 5 opens with a decorative panel that may have been intended as a title-page, but one can see only traces of lettering in the central opening (perhaps it was borrowed from another publication and the old text was removed from the stone). In the first series of page numbers 15 was accidentally repeated, and in the second series 4 blank pages (on the backs of pages 33, 66, 81 & 108) were not included in the count. The title-pages are unnumbered but sometimes counted as page 1 and sometimes preceding page 1. A few other pages are unnumbered or misnumbered (including the last page of the third series), but without further disturbing the sequence. Series 2 has no title-page, and at least in the present copy the leaves of the first and second series of pages alternate in groups of a few dozen pages, giving a very irregular pagination. The anatomical plates are inserted in groups between the pages of this combined series 1 and 2. The book is printed on unwatermaked wove paper, possibly machine-made. Bound differently than the pagination suggests, with the first two series of page numbers combined to form a single subdivision (see above). Slightly browned and with a small restoration in the decoration of the main title-page (an owner's stamp may have been removed) but still in good condition. A half dozen pages are slightly dirty and there is an occasional minor marginal defect. The binding is slightly worn and much of the decoration of the inlaid parchment is lost, but the binding remains structurally sound. A rare and remarkable Iranian lithographic medical work, with 56 anatomical plates.
¶ For lithography in Iran: Encyclopaedia Iranica (under Lithography, apparently unaware of the present work). For the author: Hormoz Ebrahimnejad, Medicine, Public Health, and the Qâjâr State, p. 51, and ibid., Medicine in Iran ... 1800-1925, (2014), note 131 on p. 190.

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An encompassing 19th century manual on physics and mechanics
26

Visconti, Achille, physician (1836-1911)? Manuscript compendium on physics and engineering. [Possibly Milan, likely 1860s]. [Possibly Milan, likely 1860s]. Large 4to (ca. 200 x 260 mm). Italian manuscript on paper, 570 written pages, with a few additional blanks, illustrated throughout with more than 200 pen and ink drawings of scientific equipment, machine models, experiments, etc., including a full-page coloured plate showing a balloon and two plates removed from Meyers Conversations-Lexikon. Contemporary half calf over marbled boards (rubbed; spine defective).

EUR 6,500.00

An encompassing 19th century manual on physics and mechanics, likely a lecture manuscript, profusely illustrated and twice signed "Visconti Achille" on the flyleaf and at the head of the first page of text. Whether or not the writer is to be identified with the like-named physician (rather than physicist) who, serving as prosector at Milan's Ospedale Maggiore, in 1870 first discovered the lung condition silicosis, must remain a matter of further research. The apparent date of composition would be consistent with a possible earlier pursuit of a university training in physics; the inclusion of an 1897 Milanese newspaper clipping, mounted to the pastedown and commemorating the passing of the great physicist Galileo Ferraris, would point both toward the medical man's known area of activity and away from a specialized anatomist with a by-then substantial list of anatomical and pathological publications to his name. The hefty, closely written volume here present covers subjects ranging from barometers to the refraction of light, fully illustrated with neat sketches and a particularly charming full-page pen and wash drawing of a hot air balloon. - Binding rubbed; interior sound.

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The Women of Leipzig Pay Homage to Bismarck
27

[Bismarck - Dedicatory Gift]. Die Frauen Leipzigs - "Die deutschen Frauen dem... grössten deutschen Manne". Gift to Bismarck by the women of Leipzig in congratulation of his 80th birthday. Leipzig, (1895). Leipzig, (1895). Full-page painting in colours and gilt on vellum, signed by Julia Schily-Koppers, and 7 paper leaves with coloured borders by Amalie Rost (one signed) around the signatures of the dedicatees. Stored in a full leather portfolio over wooden boards (412 x 574 mm) crafted by Amalie Sarling (signed): upper cover with leather carving and 4 tooled brass corner fittings with glass bosses; green moirée silk pastedowns and gilt inner dentelles to both covers.

EUR 3,500.00

Homage album for Otto von Bismarck (1815-98), who had been forced to resign as chancellor of the German Empire five years previously, on the occasion of his 80th birthday - a time at which the aged statesman was fighting to shape his image for posterity. After a vote to send him a congratulatory birthday telegram had fallen through in the Reichstag, where Bismarck enjoyed little support, some 400 German cities immediately declared him an honorary citizen - a prelude to the Bismarck mania that would seize Germany after his death three years later. The fine painting on vellum by the Westfalian artist Julia Schily-Koppers (1855-1944) depicts a young woman with four children before a bust of Bismark, the pedestal inscribed, "From the German women to the greatest German man", with the statue of Germania in the background. - Koppers, a native of Borken near the Dutch border and grandmother of the German politician Otto Schily, had studied at the Düsseldorf Academy and enjoyed an excellent reputation. The borders of the signatory sheets were painted by the Leipzig architectural painter Amalie Rost (1845-1920). They enclose more than 250 signatures by women of Leipzig, including both artists and the bookbinder. - Binding loose; some duststaining to outer margin of vellum leaf, some dampstaining to paper leaves. Portfolio shows very slight rubbing, more pronounced on lower cover, but in all very finely preserved.

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Shanghai in the early 20th century
28

[Shanghai and the Xinhai Revolution]. Photograph album. Shanghai, early 20th century. Oblong folio (362 x 274 mm). Contemporary block-bound silk album of 111 photographs. Various sizes; largest 212 x 155 mm.

EUR 25,000.00

A photograph album comprising 111 personal photographs of Shanghai, including several images of battleships, various English-language shop signs for local businesses (such as "Hsing Loong Carpenter Mason and Painter"), and 12 photographs showing the burial procession of the mother of Shanghai business man Pau Ching Po. Also, there are several photographs of the 1911 Xinhai Revolution in Shanghai: in November 1911, Shanghai citizens organised a rebellion and captured the city, establishing the Shanghai military on 8 November that same year. The photographs offered here depict the uprising in the streets as well as scenes of destroyed homes and weapons used when taking the city. The revolution resulted in the overthrow of the last imperial monarchy in China and the establishment of the Republic of China in 1912. - Also includes images of the German Theatre at the Lyceum, founded in 1930 as an amateur dramatics society, a photograph of the Prince Adalbert of Prussia (1884-1948) at the Club Concordia in 1904 laying the foundation stone to the new German Club in Shanghai, and three photographs of the wedding of Wilhelm Knappe (1855-1910), the German Consul General in Shanghai from 1899 to 1906. - Very well preserved. Provenance: From the collection of Johannes Gottfried William Schröder (1870-1942). Born in India, the brother of the German poet Rudolf Alexander Schröder grew up in Bremen, trained as a merchant and visited India, China, Japan, and America. He established his own business in Shanghai in 1906. His intimate knowledge of East Asia led him to embrace the philosophy of anthroposophy.

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An Austrian Painter, Sent to Siberia
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Schrötter von Kristelli, Hans, Austrian painter (1891-1965). POW correspondence. Siberia, 1916-1919. Siberia, 1916-1919. Mostly 8vo. 93 cards by Hans Schrötter, 83 cards to Hans Schrötter, and 19 cards by other senders (such as the Red Cross), frequently postmarked. In German.

EUR 6,500.00

An extensive correspondence between Schrötter, detained at the POW camp Blagoveshchensk in the Amur region and several other camps, and his parents and friends. One of his earliest postcards is written from Repinsk on the Volga: "Arrived safe and sound, waiting for onward transport. Onion-domed churches, shining with gold, steamers on the river. Troikas. In the midst of Tolstoy's country [...]" (15 Aug. 1916). In spite of circumstances, the first Christmas as a prisoner of war appears to have been tolerablen ("With a mate I wrote a Christmas puppet show, we wrote a play and staged it on Christmas Eve", ibid., 4 Jan. 1917). A month later, he reports: "Working on languages every day and draw, so time is not wasted, but put to good use. Also play the guitar" (2 Feb. 1917). Days seem monotonous, though not all too painful: "Remain healthy, reading, painting, and waiting. The latter I do with much patience, an art which may be acquired with time […] But how much longer my sojourn here will last, is quite unknown [...]" (to his uncle in Munich, 13 Jan. 1918). Two cards are addressed to Alfred Kliefoth (1889-1969), posted to the American embassy at St Petersburg as a military observer, from whom he requests a shipment of books in German, "if possible light and yet earnest reading" (Romanow-Borisoglepska, 28 Dec. 1916). - After his release, Hans Schrötter von Kristelli worked in Chicago and New York as an art teacher and painter of frescos; he later moved to Graz, where he created several monumental murals.

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The unknown first draft - "the future: radioactivity, smashing the atom [...] Einstein"
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Friedell, Egon, Austrian writer (1878-1938). Die Reise in die Vergangenheit. Autograph manuscript, signed... within the text. No place, [1935]. No place, [1935]. 4to. 63 ff. Copying pencil on grid paper with several corrections and deletions. Stored loosely in a folded sheet with holograph title. Within a cardboard folder (addressed to Friedell in Kufstein, Tyrol, with receipt stamp dated 13 Sept. 1935), captioned in red crayon by an unidentified hand: "Friedell Original-Handschrift zur Zeitmaschine". Sender partly erased, but identifiable by the address (Berlin W. 55. Potsdamerstr. 122) as the publisher Paul Zsolnay Verlag.

EUR 28,000.00

Original manuscript of the unfinished first draft of Friedell's science fiction novella "Die Reise mit der Zeitmaschine", a wry homage to H. G. Wells's 1895 classic "The Time Machine" which purportedly reproduces the Time Traveller's narrative of his later journeys. Friedell signs his name repeatedly in the spoof correspondence between himself and Wells. As the cardboard envelope shows, Friedell had sent his manuscript to Zsolnay in the autumn of 1935, but was apparently turned down - since Hitler had seized power in 1933, German and Austrian publishers had become wary of Jewish authors, and none dared handle a work by such a conspicuous member of the Viennese fin-de-siècle cabaret and café culture reviled by the Nazis. Nevertheless, Friedell extensively revised his manuscript, and the later version was published from his posthumous papers by R. Piper & Co. early in 1946, eight years after the author's suicide and only months before Wells's death (the book bears the military censorship imprint, "Published under Military Government Information Control License [...] 6870th District Information Services Control Command, U.S. Army"). An English translation, by Eddy C. Bertin, appeared in 1972 ("The Return of the Time Machine", New York: DAW Books). Two years later, this unique piece of German-language science fiction was re-published by Diogenes in Switzerland, who have kept it in print ever since ("Die Rückkehr der Zeitmaschine", last reprinted in 2009). - The present first version (dedicated to "All Kantians!"), which differs markedly from the published text, has hitherto not been studied. The developed story ends at the point at which the Time Traveller picks up the Sunday Times (corresponding to the ninth of the eleven chapters of the printed version). Several closely written additional pages contain further colour-coded notes, fragments and keywords for use in the subsequent narrative, some of which are so prophetically accurate that the present-day reader can hardly resist the notion of Friedell having stepped into a Time Machine of his own: "the future: radioactivity, smashing the atom [...] Einstein". - Occasional insignificant wrinkles; perfectly preserved. Includes a copy of the printed first edition.
¶ Cf. Giebisch/Gugitz 97. F. Rottensteiner, Art. "Friedell, Egon", in: Lexikon der dtspr. Science Fiction-Literatur seit 1900, hg. von C. F. Lorenz (Frankfurt a. M. 2017), S. 282-285.

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