The Arab stud founded in Saint-Cloud by King Louis-Philippe, in 36 splendid coloured plates: the patron's copy
1

Adam, Victor. Les chevaux des écuries du Roi. Paris, Tessari & Cie, impression A. Godard, [1843]. Paris, Tessari & Cie, impression A. Godard, [1843]. Folio (425 x 585 mm). 36 hand-coloured lithographic plates in 6 livraisons, each preserving its original printed wrapper. Contemp. black quarter shagreen with decorated flat spine, title stamped in gilt on upper cover with a crowned monogram.

EUR 195,000.00

Extremely rare ensemble of 36 superb horse plates drawn from nature and lithographed by the noted equestrian painter Victor Adam (1801-66), finely enhanced with watercolour and gum arabic by the artist himself. The plates were produced in 1843 with the special permission of the Marquis de Strada, stablemaster to the French King, when Louis-Philippe created a stud in the park of Saint-Cloud for the stallions he had received as gifts from the Viceroy of Egypt and other Middle Eastern princes. A contemporary witness to the event, the conte Camille de Montalivet reflected after the fall of the monarchy in his "Le Roi Louis-Philippe et sa liste civile" (1850): "At the end of the year 1842, Mehmet Ali sent to the King seven of his purest stallions, chosen by himself and coming from the most precious Arab race, the Nedjdi species. From the first months of 1843, Louis-Philippe founded an Arab stud in the park of Saint-Cloud, providing one of the most beautiful equestrian centers ever seen. The first tests soon had the best result, and new stallions arrived from Muscat and Morocco". - Muhammad Ali (1769-1849), generally considered the founder of modern Egypt, was Khedive of Egypt from 1804 to his death. A friend of France and an admirer of Napoleon, he had previously offered to King Louis-Philippe (in 1833) the obelisk which graces the Place de la Concorde in Paris. - The six livraisons of six plates each comprise: "Chevaux andalous du Roi et des Princes" (1); "Haras arabe fondé par le Roi à St Cloud. Chevaux Nedjdi offerts au Roi des Français par le Vice-Roi d'Egypte" (2, 4, 5); "Chevaux du Maroc offerts par l'Empereur Muley-abd-err-Rhamann à sa Majesté le Roi des Français" (3); and "Chevaux Mascate offerts au Roi des Français par l'Imam" (6). In addition to the printed dedication to the marquis de Strada, our copy bears an autograph gift inscription to the King's stablemaster "par son humble et très obeissant serviteur David". The plates in livraisons 3, 4, and 6 belong to the 100 printed "avant la lettre"; livraison 4 includes 4 pp. of explanatory text. - Jean-Victor-Vincent Adam joined art school at the early age of 13 and soon enjoyed high acclaim as a painter of horses and equestrian historical scenes (cf. Thieme/B. I, 69). "Il fut donc un spécialiste dans ce genre et son nom mérite au premier titre de figurer dans uns bibliographie hippique" (Menessier de la Lance I, 6). After several successful exhibitions, he learned lithography in 1824, producing nearly eight thousand different subjects. - Plates professionally cleaned with some traces of foxing. A unique set; unrecorded in trade or auction, no other copy traced in public collections.

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An illustrated Latin manuscript of Al Madkhal, bound with occult texts by Raymund Lull and others
2

Al-Qabisi, Abu Al Saqr 'Abd Al-'Aziz Ibn 'Uthman Ibn 'Ali (Alchabitius). Libellus isagogicus (Al-madkhal), with the commentary of Johannes... de Saxonia and additional works on astronomy, medicine and logic, compiled by Hieronymus Paulus of Limburg. Latin manuscript. Likely Germany (Limburg an der Lahn), 1500-1524. Likely Germany (Limburg an der Lahn), 1500-1524. Folio (220 x 305 mm). Latin composite manuscript (black ink) on paper. (100), (7 blank) ff. Some rubrication and red highlights; a few initials in gilt and red or blue. - (Bound with) II: Rolewinck, Werner. Fasciculus temporum. Cologne, Ludwig von Renchen?, not after 1483. (73 [instead of 74]) ff. With numerous woodcuts in the text, coloured by a contemporary hand. Index and first half rubricated, a few Lombardic initials. Contemporary wooden boards (upper board restored) with calf spine on three raised double bands.

EUR 165,000.00

Early 16th century Latin manuscript of al-Qabisi's most influential work, "al-Madkhal" (in the translation of Joannes Hispalensis from 1144): an introduction to some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy, the astrological science of casting nativities, or divination as to the destinies of newborns. The author, known as Alchabitius in the Latin tradition, flourished in Aleppo, Syria, in the middle of the tenth century. "Although al-Qabisi's education was primarily in geometry and astronomy, his principal surviving treatise, 'Al-madkhal ila sina'at ahkam al-nujum' ('Introduction into the Art of Astrology') in five sections [...], is on astrology. The book, as the title indicates, is an introductory exposition of some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy; its present usefulness lies primarily in its quotations from the Sassanian Andarzghar literature and from al-Kindi, the Indians, Ptolemy, Dorotheus of Sidon, Masha'allah, Hermes Trismegistus, and Valens" (DSB). Together with the writings of Abu Ma'shar and Sacrobosco's "Sphaera mundi", "al Madkhal" became Europe's authoritative introduction to astrology between the 13th and the 16th century. - Al-Qabisi's text (fol. 28r-50v) is followed by the extensive commentary of Johannes de Saxonia (51r-100r). In addition, the manuscript comprises a number of shorter additional parts, worked upon by various hands and prefixed to the "Madkhal": 1. Ramon Lull. Ars brevis ("Incipit ars brevis artis generalis ad omnes sciencias"). With several diagrams and tables in the text (fol. 1r-13r). Thorndike/K. 1315. - 2. Macer Floridus. "Herbarum quasdam dicturus carmine vires" (fol. 14r-21r). Thorndike/K. 610. Departs from the text of Choulant's 1832 edition. With later annotations, including German translations of plant names. - 3. German recipes (fol. 21r). - 4. "Nota dignas regulas de tempore flembotome multum utilis" (fol. 21v). - 5. "Prima dies vene sit moderatio cene" (fol. 21v). Six verses on phlebotomy. Thorndike/K. 1090. - 6. De temporis aptis pro flebotomia ("Rogatus a quibusdam et de tempore minucionis aliquid edocerem volens", fol. 22r-25v). A part from Johannes de Procida's "De occultis nature". Thorndike/K. 1364. - 7. De sortibus cum tabulis ("Quia verissime omnis sciencie perfecta congregacionis", fol. 25v-26r). Thorndike/K. 1226. Followed by astrological tables and diagrams with instructions for use. - 8. A short ophthalmological prescription ("Aqua sodalis", fol. 26r). - 9. Alexander Hispanus. "Melleus liquor physicae artis" (fol. 26v). Recipes relating to urine and fever. The front flyleaf bears a contemporary table of Lullist philosophical terms (likely corresponding to the "Ars brevis" opposite) and a verse against astrology in a late 17th century hand. - The editio princeps of Al-Qabisi's "Al Madkhal" had appeared at Mantua in 1473. The present text and commentary would appear to be derived from the Ratdolt edition published at Venice in 1485 (GW 844), or possibly from that published by Gregorius de Gregorii in 1491 (GW 845). The compiler Hieronymus Paulus of Limburg states his name twice (with the date): in the colophon, he substitutes his own name for that of the printer; he also appears at the end of Al-Qabisi's text on fol. 50v ("Finit textes Alkabicii per me Hieronymum Pauli anno salutis 1520"). A similar composite manuscript ("Introductiones ad astrologiam") written by the same Paulus is in the New York Public Library, Spencer Coll. Ms. 51: here, too, the writer has added various parts and annotations. Krämer (Scriptores possessoresque codicum medii aevi) references a third ms. compiled by Paulus, a Sammelhandschrift with mathematical texts (Wiesbaden, Landesbibliothek, Ms. 79), but this was lost in WWII. - Bound at the end of the volume is one of the many incunabular editions of the "Fasciculus temporum", Rolewinck's popular history of the world from Creation to Pope Sixtus IV, in an appealingly coloured copy with several early 16th century marginalia, possibly also in Paulus's hand (flaw to upper corner of a2, rebacked with some loss to text, and rebacked flaw to blank lower corner of b8; wants first blank; final leaf of the index, bound at the end, shows fraying and some loss, rebacked). - Some light browning and dampstaining throughout. Binding professionally repaired. Provenance: old sanguine inventory no. "22" on fol. 1r. Front pastedown has fragment of engraved armorial bookplate of Elector Johann Friedrich von Ostein (1689-1763), Archbishop of Mainz. His nephew Johann Franz von Ostein (1735-1809), Imperial counsellor and chamberlain, was married to Louise Charlotte von Dalberg, whose family inherited the library after the death of her husband, by which his line was extinguished. The noble family of Dalberg owned several properties in Germany and Austria; the present volume was long kept in the library of one of their smaller castles in Lower Austria before being sold to a Swiss private collection, whence it was now acquired.
¶ I: Thorndike-Kibre 1078, 351, 1713, 913. - II: HC 6914. Goff R-269. GW M38689. Proctor 1284. BMC I, 269.

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With double-page world map
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Al-Wardi, Siraj al-Din 'Umar ibn. Kitab kharida al-'Aja'in wa farida al-gharaib [The Pearl... of Wonders and the Uniqueness of Strange Things]. [Ottoman provinces, ca 1600]. [Ottoman provinces, ca 1600]. Small folio (215 x 285 mm). Arabic and Ottoman Turkish manuscript on paper, 246 ff. 21 lines of black naskh per page (text area 23 x 13 cm), with section titles in red; fol. 1r with an elaborately calligraphed title in black and red, ff. 1v-2r with red, green and gilt frames; ff. 2v-3r with an illuminated world map and fol. 27r with a coloured, marginal illustration of a nilometer in cross-section, and f. 51v with a diagram of the Ka'aba in red and black. Contemporary morocco binding with fore-edge flap, gilt-tooled and blind-stamped, with manuscript Arabic title to lower edge. Pink-dyed European endpapers watermarked with a six-point star and the letters AF. 19th-c. linen pasted over the original binding.

EUR 45,000.00

An unusually large and attractive copy of the 15th-century cosmographical compilation most often ascribed to Siraj al-Din 'Umar ibn al-Wardi. His authorship and the manner of the text's composition remain a subject of scholarly research, but it was a popular text in the Ottoman world, much copied, and translated into Turkish repeatedly. Its popularity has led to a tangled series of recensions, with different copies incorporating various different elements from the text. While some copies omit the historical and eschatological sections, ours contains all the expected sections. The text notes the world, its regions, seas, cities, rivers, and mountains. Plants and animals are also described and their various properties enumerated. The final, brief sections provide a set of capsule histories and, lastly, a description of the sayings and deeds of the Prophet and his companion. The title and preface of the present copy are in Arabic; the rest of text is an anonymous Turkish translation. Though al-Wardi's cosmography circulated in Arabic and numerous Turkish translations, this hybrid Arabic-Turkish recension is relatively unusual. The scheme of illustrations is conventional in the world map and diagram of Ka'aba, often found in copies of this work with slight variations, but less so in the cross-section of a nilometer on fol. 27r, an illustration we have not seen in other manuscripts of this text. The nilometer is not located or named in the text, but appears beside the section on Fustat, and may be the Abbasid nilometer constructed opposite Fustat in 861. The geometrically rigid map, commonly known as "Ibn-al-Wardi map", renders schematically the mediaeval Islamic image of the world: "At the center of the map are the two holiest cities of Islam, Mecca and Medina. The map shows China and India in the north and the 'Christian sects and the states of Byzantium' in the south. The outer circles represent the seas" (Cat. "World treasures of the Library of Congress: Beginnings" [2002]). - Though the manuscript's binding has suffered from much use and from an unsympathetic attempt to repair it in the 19th century, it provides ample evidence of an expensive, luxuriously produced copy in the traces of the original decoration still visible beneath the later cloth, while its vividly dyed endpapers suggest an unusual taste for colour on the part of the patron who first commissioned this manuscript. - Pastedowns renewed; heavily worn, but sound. Internally, a little staining to the initial folios, and a small dampstain to the gutter, otherwise clean. Ownership inscription of Mustafa, an artillery officer, dated 1067 AH (1676/7 CE).
¶ GAL II, p. 163.

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The earliest printed reference to "Barechator" (bar Qatar)
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Balbi, Gasparo. Viaggio dell'Indie Orientali. Venice, Camillo Borgominieri, 1590. Venice, Camillo Borgominieri, 1590. 8vo. (16), 149 ff. (mis-numbered as 159), (1) p., (23) ff., with woodcut diagram (f. 144), woodcut headpieces and initials. Bound in 19th c. polished tan calf, gilded spine, gilt borders to covers, gilt turn-ins, marbled pastedowns, red edges, silk ribbon bookmark, stamped by binder "Dupré" on front flyleaf.

EUR 150,000.00

First edition of this important travelogue by the Venetian state jeweller and gem merchant Gasparo Balbi, detailing his nine-year voyage from Venice to the Far East between 1579 and 1588, and a work of special historical interest for its eyewitness information about the Arabian Peninsula in this early period. In this book, Balbi was "the first writer to record the place names between al-Qatif and Oman that are still in use today" (G. R. King, p. 74). His "interest in the area lay in the pearls that came from the oyster beds of which the most extensive are those in the waters around al-Bahrayn, those off the Qatar peninsula and especially those in the western waters of Abu Dhabi. Either taking his information first-hand from a local individual or using a navigator's list, Balbi recorded place-names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and the Sultanate of Oman" (G. King, p. 248). According to Slot, "practically none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (p. 36). The present work is also of the highest significance for including "the first European record of the Bani Yas tribe" (UAE Yearbook 2006, p. 20), the largest and most important tribe of the Arabian Peninsula, from which emerged both the Al Nahyan and the Al Maktoum dynasties, today's ruling families of Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Balbi travelled extensively in the Arabian Peninsula in search of precious stones. He knew "the waters off the Abu Dhabi coast as the Sea of Qatar and mentions the following places now in UAE territory: Daas (Das), Emegorcenon (Qarnein), Anzevi (Azanah), Zerecho (Zirkuh), Delmephialmas (Dalma), Sirbeniast (Sir Bani Yas), Aldane (Dhanna), Cherizan (identified as Khor Qirqishan, just off Abu Dhabi island), Dibei (Dubai), Sarba (Sharjah), Agiman (Ajman), Emelgovien (Umm al-Quwain), Rasa-elchime (Ras al Khaimah), Sircorcor (Khor al-Khuwair), Debe (Dibba), Chorf (Khor Fakkan) and Chelb (Kalba)" (G. R. King, UAE: A New Perspective, 74). From Venice Balbi sailed for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir and from there overland to Baghdad, descending the Tigris to Basra, where he embarked for India. The Viaggio dell'Indie Orientaliproved to be the most widely read source of information about India throughout the next century. In the tradition of mercantile guidebooks, such as the 14th century "Practica della mercatura" compiled by Pegolotti, this is one of the few secular travelogues to the Orient published in the 16th century. And in addition to providing the kind of practical information required by merchants trading in precious stones among other wares, Balbi, with a jeweler's eye for rarities, allows himself considerable license in recording his personal observations at exotic sights (e.g., the cave Temples of Elephanta and his enthusiasm for elephant tusks f. 100v) or in mentioning incidental occurrences along the way, such as his chance meeting in Goa with the famous embassy of Japanese legates on their way home. Balbi dates his stays to particular places in a precise manner, always gives a careful explanation of the local system of exchange (coins, weights, and measures), describes commercial routes in India in detail and even includes a monsoon calendar. Balbi also discusses Goa, Negapatam, and Pegu (Burma), the latter a source of great fascination owing to its sensational wealth and the section most frequently anthologized in travel collections. The "Viaggio dell'Indie Orientali" was reprinted in 1600 (also rare). The account was translated into Latin and equipped with illustrations in the 1606 'India' volume of the De Bry series, and a partial English translation (above all, the section on Pegu) subsequently appeared in Purchas. An Arabic translation was published in 2008, but a full English translation never appeared. - Minor rubbing and edge wear to spine and boards. Narrow upper margin, mend at f. 25, otherwise remarkably well preserved.
¶ BM-STC Italian 68. Howgego I, B7. Cordier Japonica 112. Brunet I, 618. Graesse I, 279. Kress Library of Economic Literature S 276. B. J. Slot, The Arabs of the Gulf, 1602-1784. G. King, "Delmephialmas and Sircorcor: Gasparo Balbi, Dalmâ, Julfâr and a Problem of Transliteration," Arabian Archeology and Epigraphy, vol. 17 (2006), pp. 248-252. UAE Yearbook 2006, p. 20. G. R. King, "The Coming of Islam and the Islamic Period in the UAE," in UAE: A New Perspective, I. Al-Abed & P. Hellyer (eds.), pp. 68-97. W. M. Floor, The Persian Gulf: A Political and Economic History of Five Port Cities, 1500-1730. Lach, Asia in the Making of Europe, I.1, 473-475. Penrose, Travel and Discovery, 198. Placido Zurla, Di Marco Polo e degli altri viaggiatori veneziani piu illustri, II, 258-265. J. Charpentier, "Cesare di Fedrici and Gasparo Balbi," Indian Antiquary LIII (1924), pp. 51-54.

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A "landmark of human thought": the most important scientific publication of the 16th century
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Copernicus, Nicolaus. De revolutionibus orbium coelestium, libri VI. Basel, Henricpetri, 1566. Basel, Henricpetri, 1566. Folio (202 x 293 mm). (6), 213, (1) pp. With woodcut printer's device on title page, different device on verso of final leaf, and numerous diagrams in the text. Contemporary full vellum with hand-lettered spine title.

EUR 350,000.00

Second edition of the most important scientific publication of the 16th century and a "landmark of human thought" (PMM). A fine copy in a contemporary binding. "De revolutionibus" was the first work to propose a comprehensive heliostatic theory of the cosmos, according to which the sun stood still and the earth revolved around it. It thereby inaugurated one of the greatest paradigm shifts in the history of human thought. This edition is the first to contain Rheticus's "Narratio prima", first published in an exceptionally rare edition at Gdansk in 1540. The "Narratio" summarizes and champions the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis and records Rheticus's indefatigable efforts to persuade Copernicus to publish. The text follows the 1543 first edition, including Andreas Osiander's controversial unsigned preface, in which he attempted to placate potential critics of the work by emphasizing its purely theoretical aspect. Petri added a prefatory recommendation by the noted astronomer Erasmus Reinhold (printed at the end of the index), stating that "all posterity will gratefully remember the name of Copernicus, by whose labor and study the doctrine of celestial motions was again restored from near collapse" (Owen Gingerich's translation, Eye of Heaven, p. 221). In his census of the 1543 and 1566 editions, Owen Gingerich located 317 copies of the second, making it only slightly less rare than the first. The total edition size has been estimated at 500 copies only.
¶ Adams C 2603. Cinti 48 (3). Houzeau/Lancaster 2503. Taylor, Mathematical Practitioners, pp. 184, 199 & 138. Cf. PMM 70 for the first edition.

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Fine Ottoman costume watercolours, with distinguished provenance
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[Costume drawings]. An album of eight fine watercolour drawings depicting... the costume of Constantinople and the Ottoman World. Constantinople, later 16th century. 4to (168 x 212 mm). 8 watercolour drawings, some heightened with white or gold, captioned in German in a late 16th-c. hand, on 8 leaves and a further 24 blank leaves (for the watermark cf. Briquet 917: Nuremberg 1554 or 1565-82). Contemporary limp vellum without ties.

EUR 85,000.00

An album of eight splendid costume paintings, by a talented, unidentified artist who may have been a member of the entourage of a German ambassador to the Porte. The subjects in this collection are captioned: "Der Kriechen Patriarch" (the Greek Patriarch); "Der Türckisch Keiser" (the Turkish Sultan); "Der Türckisch Babst" (the Grand Mufti); "Türckische weiber wie sie pflegen auf der gaßen zu gehen" (Turkish women, as it is their wont to dress in the street); "Also sizen die Türckischen weiber" (Thus sit the Turkish women); "Ein Epirotische frau wie sie in Iren Heusern zu Galata pflegen zu gehen" (a woman of Epirus, as they walk about in their houses in Galata); "Ein Kriegische fraw" (a Greek woman); and "Ein Armenerin" (an Armenian woman). - Great attention to both accuracy and details is shown: indeed, the suite may be related to another set of similar drawings in the Gennadius Library (A896 B), dated to about 1573 (cf. Blackmer Cat.). There is also some resemblance in style and presentation to certain of the costume illustrations in Nicolas de Nicolay's Navigations (1568, and later editions). Although Nicolay travelled in the Levant in the 1550s and was long thought to have drawn his costume subjects from life, doubt has been cast on this view, and it is now generally considered that he drew his subjects from the work of other artists and illustrators. - A little light dust-soiling, binding with minor wear, soiling and wormholes. Provenance: from the collection of Ferdinand Sigismund Kress von Kressenstein (1641-1704), councilman of Nuremberg whose father signed the Peace of Westphalia treaty (his armorial bookplate on the front pastedown). Later in the library of Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein (1906-89), with his armorial bookplate on the flyleaf. Latterly in the collection of Henry Myron Blackmer II (1923-88), with his bookplate to the pastedown, sold at Sotheby's in 1989 (Blackmer sale, lot 80) and purchased by Herry W. Schaefer (1934-2016).
¶ Blackmer 1887 (with two illustrations: p. 42 and frontispiece facing p. 1). Cf. Haydn Williams, "Additional printed sources for Ligozzi's series of figures of the Ottoman Empire", in: Master Drawings, vol. 51, no. 2 [Summer 2013], pp. 195-220; Metin And, Istanbul in the 16th century: the city, the palace, daily life (Istanbul, 1994).

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Egypt and Nubia in 45 early drawings and squeezes, preserving images of sculptures and inscriptions
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[Drawings - Egypt]. Robertson, William. [Binding-title:] Egypt & Nubia. Cairo [and elsewhere in Egypt and Nubia], 1838-1839. Cairo [and elsewhere in Egypt and Nubia], 1838-1839. Double Crown folio (48 x 36.5 cm). [37] ll. including title-leaf and 7 blanks, plus 16 loosely inserted ll. Album containing 42 pencil and other drawings (a few partly coloured) and 3 squeezes, some on the album leaves and some loosely inserted, mostly of ancient Egyptian and Nubian architecture, sculpture, bas-reliefs and hieroglyphic inscriptions, but also with a few botanical drawings and landscapes with buildings. Most have English-language captions in brown ink and are signed and dated 1838 to 1839. New black half morocco, on recessed cords, title and double fillets in gold on spine, using mid-19th-century marbled paper for the sides (blue-green Spanish-marble with black and white veins).

EUR 45,000.00

An album of drawings (and squeezes of bas reliefs) made by William Robertson on a journey from Cairo in December 1838 down the Nile into Nubia, reaching as far south as the present-day Egyptian-Sudanese border region, including the temples of Abu Simbel, in January 1839, then returning via Philae, Karnak and other sites to Thebes in February 1839. They give very detailed views of numerous buildings, sculptures, bas-reliefs and hieroglyphic inscriptions, as well as more distant views of landscapes with buildings and three botanical drawings. While Robertson made most of his drawings on site, he drew the Temple at Luxor after a drawing by Achille Émile Prisse d'Avennes (1807-1879) who began exploring and drawing the ancient Egyptian sites in 1836 and published many of his drawings in 1847. The squeezes of bas-reliefs are of special interest, for they preserve a very precise record of the original with little influence from personal interpretation: the paper was wetted, pressed into the relief and allowed to dry. In addition to the three clear squeezes, a couple of the drawings also seem to have been made on flattened squeezes (some of those that survive as squeezes also have some lines drawn over them them). Since many of the ancient Egyptian sites have been looted and damaged over the years, these early drawings and squeezes provide an important record of what was there in 1838/39 and how it was situated, before the first photographs were made. The building of the old Aswan dam in 1902 caused frequent flooding and damage at the site of Philae, now an island, and most of its treasures were removed before completion of the new Aswan dam in 1970. The album has no true title-page, but the leaf before the first drawing has a slip pasted to it giving the name of the artist, dated from Cairo, December 1838. We have not identified the artist. The clergyman and historian William Robertson and his son of the same name died before 1838 and the archaeologist William Robertson Smith was not born until 1846. Thieme & Becker notes two artists named William Robertson, active two or three decades before and after the present drawings, but provides so little information that we cannot link them to either. He may possibly be the Irish-born London architect William Robertson (1770-1850), who took an early interest in Egyptian revival, but he would have been nearly seventy when these drawings were made. The loosely inserted drawings and squeezes are made on at least 8 different paper stocks, wove and laid, one of the wove stocks machine-made (the "watermark" left by the papermaking machine's belt seam appears in one sheet). A few of the original album leaves are now detached and may have been removed by the artist himself. The squeezes have inevitably been flattened in the album, but they still show the contours of the original bas-reliefs very clearly. One inserted drawing is severely foxed and one inserted floor plan is rather dirty, but in general the drawings are in very good condition. A detailed graphic record of ancient Egyptian art, architecture and hieroglyphic inscriptions, made before many of the worst depredations.

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Monumental nautical work with 24 volvelles
8

Dudley, Sir Robert. Arcano del Mare. Florence, Giuseppe Cocchini, Giacopo Bagnoni & Antonio Francesco Lucini, 1661. Florence, Giuseppe Cocchini, Giacopo Bagnoni & Antonio Francesco Lucini, 1661. Large folio (500 x 560 mm). Book 1: (4), 30 pp., with engraved vignette of navigational instrument on printed title-page; double-page-sized engraved plate (facsimile of the Patent), 28 engraved plates including 24 volvelles: 21 with 29 moveable parts and 3 with strings. Book 2: 24 pp., 9 engraved plates with 6 volvelles (and 9 moveable parts), lacking the 15 engraved maps. Book 3: 25, (1) pp., 6 engraved plates. Book 4: 12 pp, 14 engraved plates (7 of which are double-page-sized). Book 5: 26 pp., 89 engraved plates, 36 with volvelles (with 61 moveable parts, another loose, and 5 strings), 4 double-page-sized. Without Book 6 (containing the Sea Charts). In all, 146 engraved plates, of which 66 show one or more volvelles, with 100 moveable parts. Full contemporary calf, ornate gilt spine with original red calf gilt title label. Includes Dudley's maritime map of the Indian Ocean, with the east of the Arabian Peninsula.

EUR 85,000.00

Second (and arguably best) edition of Dudley’s landmark work on shipbuilding, nautical and astronomical instruments and navigation, all profusely illustrated with engravings. Book 1 deals with longitude; book 2 covers the errors which can be made when drawing sea-charts; book 3 deals with military and naval manoeuvres and exercise; book 4 describes the method of designing and building ships, on which this present work is the first scientific publication; book 5 is devoted to the art of navigation. Book 6, which is not present here, contains the sea atlas. The "Arcano del Mare (secrets of the sea) ... is an encyclopedia of everything connected with the sea from shipbuilding to navigation to cartography. This volume contains the text and volvelles for the sections devoted to navigation. It has been said that this volume is to the history of precision instruments of the seventeenth century what Peter Apian’s Astronomicum Caesareum was to the sixteenth" (Tomash & Williams).- The engraver employed for the immense task was Antonio Francesco Lucini, born in Florence in 1605. Lucini states in this second edition of 1661 that he worked for twelve years in a small Tuscan village, using 5,000 pounds of copper to make the plates. They represent the finest of Italian capabilities, the clarity of the engraving presenting an uncluttered image. Even the florid italic calligraphy, while fulfilling a purpose, is of the highest standard. - This is an example of the first volume only, containing books 1-5 of 6 but lacking the 15 general maps. The Library of Congress possesses a similar volume, and Phillips describes in detail the differing collations of Books 1-5. "The remainder of the work consists of writings to explain navigation, latitude and longitude, winds, tides, military and naval warfare, naval architecture, and instruments. Dudley illustrates his constructions and supplies working models with volvelles and pointers which can be moved for calculations [...] Up to about 1946, the Specola Museum in Florence possessed working wooden models of the instruments devised by Dudley. Unfortunately they were unwittingly destroyed in a building's incinerator during a fuel shortage" (Dilke). - Bookplate of the Institution of Naval Architects, Scott Library collection, recording presentation of the book by Mr. R. E. Scott, July 1930, on front pastedown. Hinges restored preserving original spine. Generally in very good condition.
¶ Phillips 3428. Shirley, M.Dud-1b.D ilke, "Sir Robert Dudley's contribution to cartography", in: The Map Collector 19 (June 1982), pp. 10-14. The A. E. Nordenskiöld Collection 70. Tomash & Williams D69.

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The Football Collection
9

[Football Collection]. An Outstanding Collection of Books About Football, Removed... From the Library of Peter Fadanelli Various places, 1580-2014. Various places, 1580-2014. An ensemble of more than 100 volumes of books and nearly 200 autographs, prints and manuscripts, to be sold as a collection.

EUR 350,000.00

Born in Purkersdorf near Vienna shortly after the Second World War into a family of noble descent, Peter Fadanelli moved to Stockholm, Sweden as a young man immediately after finishing his university education. He soon became an avid collector of books and manuscripts from many fields, eventually forming the largest known collection of so-called 'Exilliteratur' - books published abroad by the German and Austrian cultural elite who had been forced into emigration worldwide by Nazi persecution. His library included the greatest rarities by the most eminent German authors, printed in the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Shanghai, and the U.S. It was dispersed through our company in the early 1990s, and some of the books and the unique manuscript material found a new home in the German National Library, Frankfurt am Main, while the remainder went to the Österreichische Exilbibliothek im Literaturhaus, Vienna, where it still forms the nucleus of their collection. - A true football fan since his early youth (his favourite club is Rapid Wien, whose matches he still attends regularly when visiting his hometown) and himself an amateur player for most of his life, Peter Fadanelli was a regular buyer of books on football, as well. He maintains residences in Austria, Sweden, Spain and Italy and travels a good part of the year, which has presented him with some unique opportunities to acquire truly outstanding rarities, some of which are not to be found in any other private or institutional collection worldwide. To our knowledge the library of Peter Fadanelli is the only one of its kind to boast a complete collection of all editions of the earliest monograph on the game of football, the breathtakingly rare earliest manuscript record of an actual team lineup, and all important early depictions of the game, including Zocchi's monumental print of a 17th century football field. The Football League, published annually by the chief editor of FC Arsenal's programme in only 25 complete copies, is a veritable treasure trove of information, but is neither recorded in the British Library nor held in any other institution. Also, the Fadanelli Collection is home to virtually all the early standard reference works on the history of the game, the principal training manuals, some of the very rare annual programmes of English football clubs, and a few unique signed copies. Altogether the collection comprises a little more than 100 volumes of books, and nearly twice that figure in autographs, prints and manuscripts. - Due not only to the uniqueness of the collection and to the many rarities included, but also because of the fact that the owner divides his life between so many countries, it proved a difficult task to obtain all the export licenses necessary to dispose of this collection. With this issue resolved only recently (all licenses were finally granted in early 2017), we have been entrusted by the collector to find a new home for his library and are proud now to offer his collection for sale. For this purpose we have added but a small number of items so as to close a few minor gaps in the Fadanelli corpus (including some of the official World Cup publications, now forming a complete set from 1950 to 2014, an original photograph of Qatar's first football stadium, and a collection of more than 160 autographs by famous football players of the last decades. - A detailed catalogue is available upon request.

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1472 incunable of an encyclopaedia of the world, containing references to Arabia, Syria, Palestine, and the Saracens
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Honorius of Autun (Honorius Augustodunensis). De imagine mundi. [Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1472]. [Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1472]. Folio (310 x 220 mm). (46) ff., one final blank. Rubricated in red throughout and about half of the spaces left for initials filled in red by hand. 19th century red sheepskin, marbled sides.

EUR 45,000.00

First edition of the popular "Imago mundi" of Honorius Augustodunensis (1080-1154), an incunabular encyclopaedia of popular cosmology and geography combined with a chronicle of world history, containing references to Arabia, Syria, Palestine, and the Saracens and thus providing one of the earliest mentions of Arabia ever printed. The monk Honorius takes the river Nile as the boundary between Africa and Asia (naming the latter continent in its entirety "India"). Arabia is described in the subsection on Mesopotamia. The description of this country, found along the Tigris and the Euphrates, also includes an account of the Kingdom of Sheba, home of the Queen of Sheba, and is said to be inhabited by the Moabites, Syrians, Saracens and others. After Mesopotamia we find Syria, including Phoenicia, which is followed by sections on Palestine and Egypt. - The "Imago mundi", which by scholarly consent was not published after 5 February 1473, exemplified the picture of Africa and the Orient prevalent in the West ca. 1100, which were perceived as lands full of marvels. It is one of the five earliest books printed by the great and prolific Nuremberg printer Anton Koberger. - Binding slightly rubbed; a few early manuscript annotations by a near-contemporary humanist in the margins. From the library of the Frankfurt physician Georg Franz Burkhard Kloß (1787-1854), also a noted historian of freemasonry, with his bookplate on pastedown; additional bookplate of Jean R. Perrette. Lacking the second of the two last blank leaves. A few wormholes, a couple of leaves attached to stubs, but otherwise in very good condition.
¶ Hain 8800. Goff H-323. GW 12942. BMC II, 411. Proctor 1974. Panzer II, 234.342. ISTC IH00323000. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.

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A highly important illustrated account of a visit to Muscat and the Sultan of Oman, hitherto unpublished
11

Page, Théogène François, captain of the frigate La Favorit (1807-1867). Campagne de la Favorite - Journal. In the Gulf and elsewhere at sea, 3 June 1841 - 5 January 1844. In the Gulf and elsewhere at sea, 3 June 1841 - 5 January 1844. Autograph ship's journal in French. Folio (335 x 220 mm). 2 vols. with a total of 192 unnumbered pages (of which 30 are blank). In black ink, with more than 40 small pen or pencil drawings in the text, ranging from simple coastal profiles to detailed and skilfully executed views of cities and fortifications. With 11 inserted items, including a 27 July 1842 letter from Admiral Guy-Victor Duperré (Ministère de la Marine et des Colonies) to Captain Page, and a slip with neatly drawn Chinese characters. Contemporary plain-paper wrappers, with manuscript title on both front wrappers. Stored in custom-made half morocco case with gilt title to spine.

EUR 350,000.00

Primary source for the very first French diplomatic mission to the Arabian Gulf, the trucial Sheikhdoms, Oman and Bahrein, which was published only in extracts (Billlecoq 2001, cf. below) and of which to this day no critical edition exists. The Captain's meticulous, illustrated account of the voyage of the French corvette La Favorite, departing under his command from Brest on 3 June 1841, sailing around Africa and along Madagascar to India and the Gulf (extensively exploring both the Arabian and the Persian coasts as far as present-day Kuwait), around the Arabian Peninsula into the Red Sea, then around the southern tip of India to the East Indies, the South China Sea and up the Chinese coast as far as Zhejiang province. "Its journey across the eastern seas, especially to the Gulf, was a landmark event. For the first time, a French government was dispatching a ship on a mission to the Gulf, specifically to the Sovereign of the States of the Bahrain Islands" (Billecocq). - While Page often records brief pieces of information about the weather and coordinates, he includes much more descriptive text than most ships' journals, and often illustrates the account with drawings of fortifications (often quite detailed), natural landmarks, tornados and locals, as well as clothes, utensils and other objects. The journal also gives much detail of the return voyage through the seas around the East Indies, but only brief reports for the further voyage home, ending on 5 January 1844. - The first volume closes on 17 October 1841, when Page visited the Kailasanatha temple (Ellora, India). The next volume starts nearly a month later, on 16 November, when the ship was near Bombay. They sailed, via Karachi (Pakistan), to Muscat, where they arrived on 4 December. There Page was received by the "second son" of Said bin Sultan al Said (1791-1856), the Sultan of Muscat and Oman, who himself was staying at Zanzibar. Sayyid Thuwaini bin Said al-Said (1821-71), actually the Sultan's third son, would succeed his father in 1856. Page describes Thuwaini and his residence, and on the following days describes the city's harbour and fortifications, the market (where one could buy pearls, rhinoceros skin and coconut oil from Africa, Indian ghee and much more) and some surrounding villages. He also includes a small drawing of a veiled woman. The ship left the city on 9 December, sailing north through the strait of Hormuz (16 December) and continuing along the Persian coast. On 25 December it reached "Cangoun" (Bandar-e Kangan, Persia), where Page visited Sheikh Diégara (or Diegarah) at his house near the sea for two days. He gives a description of the Sheikh's house and its surroundings, again including a drawing of a veiled woman and a small drawing of a "machine singalière" that watered the gardens (a well with a pump?). On 31 December, back at sea again, Page had a conversation with his Arabic guide about Abdullah bin Saud, who ruled the first Saudi State from 1814 to 1818, and his imprisonment by Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt (1789-1848). They also discussed the infamous pirate "Rah'm Ben Jaber": Rahmah ibn Jabir Al Jalhami (ca. 1760-1826), his father Jabir bin Adhbi and their relation to Sheikh Abdullah bin Ahmad Al Kalifa, the ruling family of Bahrain. On 2 January 1842 La Favorite anchored at Bushehr, where Page met a certain "Monsieur Malcolm" who invited him to visit Sheikh Nasr (Nasser) in the house that was built by Nasr's father, Sheikh Abdur Rassoul. Page stayed there for several days, going horse-back riding with the Sheikh, describing the region and provisioning his ship before leaving on 7 January. The following day Page visited a fortress, shown in some small drawings in the present journal. On 14 January La Favorite sailed for Bahrein, arriving on the 18th. "This was a truly singular historic event, being the first time that diplomatic relations were established between France and the renowned Gulf islands, so influential in the history of the Middle East and of world civilizations" (Billecocq). He went ashore at Muharraq, where he was welcomed by the ruler, Sheikh Abdullah bin Ahmad al Khalifa. It has recently been suggested that Abdullah was a much greater and more important figure in Bahrain's history than has been previously recognised (cf. Abdulaziz Mohamed Hasan Ali al Khalifa, Relentless warrior and shrewd tactician: Shaikh Abdullah bin Ahmad of Bahrain 1795-1849, PhD thesis, University of Exeter, 2013). According to Page, the Sheikh was very interested in France and its "sultan", asking many questions and saying: "You are the first of the French sultan's captains I have seen here. Your ship is the first to come here, welcome!" (vol. 2, p. 19). Later that day Page visited the Sheikh's son Hassan and Ali, where he dined. The next day Page was given some "splendid" Arab horses to explore the island with. He gives a description of Muharraq, the mosques, the bazaar, and some surroundings. On 20 January Page writes he wants to visit the "île du pirate Rah'm ben Jimber" (island of the pirate Rahm bin Jabir), but was unable to do so and visited Manama instead. He gives a vivid picture of the bazaar, mentioning dates from the south, woolen cloth from Lassa, fabric from Bombay, pearls, etc. He also briefly touches on the Portuguese influence in the region. On 21 January Sheikh Hassan came aboard La Favorite, and Page enjoyed the festivities in the city. The ship left Bahrein on 22 January and arrived at the isle of "Kichmie" (probably Qishm, Iran, since Page mentioned he could see Ormuz) on 27 January, where he met Sheikh Abderaman. Included here are some relatively large architectural drawings of the Sheikh's house, the harbour, a view with some ruins and a ground plan of a fortress. Page gives lengthy description of each day up to the first of February, when the ship left for Muscat . La Favorite anchored at Muscat from 6 to 21 February to reprovision for the long journey to the East Indies. "While waiting for the ship to be prepared for the journey, Page left to explore the area around the Omani capital and discovered the charming valley of Al-Bustan" (Billecocq). - Page's decision to keep within this journal the letter by Admiral Duperre, Ministère de la Marine et des Colonies, adressed to him from Paris, 27 July 1842, makes perfect sense, as the Admiral congratulates Page extensively on his very interesting report on the Gulf: "Vous me rendiez compte, qu’après avoir exploré le golfe Persique, la corvette la Favorite avait mouillé pour la seconde fois sur la rade de Mascate [...] La lecture de ces rapports m’a vivement intéressé et les détails qu’ils renferment sur les différents points que vous avez successivement visités [...] ont particulierèment fixé mon attention". Obviously Page was well aware of the importance and unique value of his observations made during a journey still characterized in the 21st century as a "landmark event" (Billecoq), all of which finally comes to light through the present journal. - Provenance: Chateau de Vincennes, Paris, deaccessioned and sold to the Swedish Bookseller and collector Björn Löwendahl, bought from his heirs.
¶ Xavier Beguin Billecocq, Un vasseau français à Bahreïn, 1842: une première diplomatique / A French ship's journey to Bahrain, 1842: a diplomatic first (Paris 2001). Bequin Billecocq, Oman, pp. 190f. J. Peterson, Historical Muscat, p. 129 ("unpublished manuscript, cited in Billecocq").

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Very Early Photographs of Muslim Holy Sites in Jerusalem
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Pierotti, Ermete, Italian engineer, topographer and archaeologist (1820-1880). Le Mont Moria. Album of original photographs and... manuscript plans of Jerusalem. Jerusalem, February/March 1861. Jerusalem, February/March 1861. Landscape folio (400 x 530 mm). Private album with 13 original albumenised salt prints by Mendel Diness (but the view of the Al-Aqsa Mosque taken by the Austrian photographer Othon von Ostheim), 4 original manuscript maps and plans in delicate hand-colour, and 2 large engraved or photographically reproduced plans. Presentation binding of contemporary "native" brown sheepskin. Smooth spine with simple wavy-line banding, sides with roll-tool border of foliate motifs and urns (in gilt on front, in blind on back) enclosing a single-line panel with scrolling corner pieces, gilt lettered on front cover.

EUR 90,000.00

Fascinating and important dedication album of original photographs and hand-coloured manuscript maps of Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem. Assembled by the Jerusalem-based archaeologist Ermete Pierotti for presentation to Edmond de Barrère (1819-90), the French consul general in Jerusalem, with Pierotti's (partially erased) inscription on the large map: "L'auteur á Monsieur [Consul de France], chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur". - Of the 13 photographs, 6 are devoted to the great Ayyubid Mosque of Omar and a further 2 to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and Haram al-Sharif. The 4 manuscript maps and plans are delicately hand-coloured, finely detailed and extensively annotated, reflecting Pierotti's painstaking approach. They show Jerusalem, the Church of St Anne, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Greek Convent, and Bethlehem. The photo reproduction of the plan of Haram al-Sharif notes that the original was presented to the British consul James Finn. - Pierotti was a colourful figure of Palestine archaeology. A former captain in the Corps of Royal Piedmontese Army Engineers, he was appointed architect and engineer of Jerusalem by the Ottoman governor Sureyya Pasha in 1858, and "this gave him the opportunity to explore various places in the city, including the Haram al-Sharif, something which hardly any non-Muslims had done at the time" (Legouas). A respected authority who assisted British, French and Russian researchers and pilgrims during his time in Jerusalem, Pierotti was entrusted with important research commissions and stood in direct contact with the French consul. It is likely the present ensemble to which Pierotti referred in an autobiographical note (quoted by the French historian Legouas), stating that in 1856 he "had already placed in an album several plans, sections and photographs of Jerusalem, of which I had acquired part from Mr. Diness, and others had been given to me by Padre Andrea, a Franciscan amateur in photography." In 1857, he writes, "M. de Barrère, the French Consul, employed me in measuring the Church of St Anne and all the neighbouring ground, and ordered me to make a plan, sections, and levels on a large scale, which I did." Pierotti would draw on several of the photos here present for his 1864 book "Jerusalem Explored". All but one of them were contributed by the long-neglected Jewish photographer Mendel Diness (1827-1900), who today is hailed as one of the earliest photographers of Jerusalem, following the sensational rediscovery of some 130 of his glass negatives in 1989. - Spine sunned, some wear to extremities, large strip across back cover neatly repaired, large map of Jerusalem with old tape repairs on verso, some cockling where photographic prints have been mounted yet overall very good. Detailed list of contents available upon request.
¶ Cf. Jean-Yves Legouas, "Saving Captain Pierotti?", in: Palestine Exploration Quarterly 145.3 [2013], pp. 231-250. Dror Wahrman, Capturing the Holy Land: M. J. Diness and the Beginnings of Photography in Jerusalem, Harvard, 1993.

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Rare series of 50 views of Russian customs and costumes
13

[Russia] - Houbigant, Armand Gustave. Moeurs et costumes des Russes, représentés en 50... planches coloriées, exécutées en lithographie. Paris, Firmin Didot, 1817. Paris, Firmin Didot, 1817. Folio. (4), 20 pp. text. With wood-engraved illustration on title page and 50 numbered lithographed plates in the publisher's hand colour. Modern half calf, with part of the original lithographed wrappers mounted on front.

EUR 65,000.00

Printer's issue of the rare first edition of a series of hand-coloured views of Russian customs and costumes, executed by the French artist Armand Gustave Houbigant (1789-1862) in collaboration with the artist Hippolyte Bellangé and the early experimental lithographer Charles de Lasteyrie. With 20 pages of letterpress text giving descriptions of the plates. Most of the plates are (in part) copies from Atkinson's "A picturesque representation of the manners, customs, and amusements of the Russians" (1803-04), but are here executed in typical chalk lithographs instead of Atkinson's aquatints. - Regular issues were printed with the names of the publishers: Paris, Treuttel & Wurtz, and Strasbourg, "même maison de commerce". A second edition was published in 1821, and 30 of the plates were published in "Recueil de trente croquis lithographies representant des scenes et costumes Russes". - Each leaf mounted to modern stubs, some occasional spots, title-page slightly browned, and some of the impressions of the plates a bit weak, the colouring still very good. A very good copy, wholly untrimmed.
¶ Bobins Collection 195. Colas 1496. Hiler 448. WorldCat (7 copies). Cf. Lipperheide 1352f. (1821 ed.). For Houbigant see Thieme/Becker XVII, 554.

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The birth of modern anatomy: a coloured copy of the first edition, used by the surgeon of the Duke of Saxony
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Vesalius, Andreas. De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Folio (319 x 456 mm). 355 leaves and two folding sheets. Roman and italic types, occasional use of Greek and Hebrew types, printed shoulder notes. Woodcut pictorial title, author portrait, and printer’s device; 7 large, 186 mid-sized, and 22 small woodcut initials; more than 200 woodcut illustrations, including 3 full-page skeletons, 14 full-page muscle men, 5 large diagrams of veins and nerves, 10 mid-sized views of the abdomen, 2 mid-sized views of the thorax, 13 mid-sized views of the skull and brain, and numerous smaller views of bones, organs and anatomical parts. All woodcuts and initials up to page 165 in full contemporary hand colour. Contemporary blindstamped leather over wooden boards with bevelled edges, on five raised double bands, with two clasps.

EUR 950,000.00

A truly outstanding copy of one of the greatest and most appealing books in the history of science. Preserved in its original binding with the blindstamped initials of its first owner, the German physician Caspar Neefe (1514-79), and with his handwritten annotations throughout, the present copy is partly coloured by a contemporary artist (including the iconic woodcut used as title page and all anatomical illustrations up to page 165). Caspar Neefe, who later served as personal physician to Duke Albert I of Saxony, acquired the precious volume only a year after its publication and obviously consulted it extensively throughout his career as a medical practitioner. - With the publication of "De humani corporis fabrica" (when he was only twenty-eight) Vesalius revolutionized both the science of anatomy and how it was taught. In his preface he describes his disappointing experiences as a student in Paris and Louvain, stating his intention to reform the teaching of anatomy by giving in this book a complete description of the structure of the human body, thereby drawing attention "to the falsity of Galen’s pronouncements". Vesalius also broke with tradition by performing dissections himself instead of leaving this task to assistants: the striking and dramatic title illustration shows him conducting such a dissection, his hand plunged into a female cadaver (striking in itself, as only the cadavers of executed criminals could be dissected legally and female criminals were rarely executed), surrounded by a seething mass of students. - The "Fabrica" is also revolutionary for "its unprecedented blending of scientific exposition, art and typography" (Norman). The woodcuts by artists of the school of Titian are both iconographically and artistically important. The series of fourteen muscle men show landscapes that, when assembled in reverse order, form a panorama of the Euganean Hills near Padua, a scenery well known to Vesalius while he was at work on the Fabrica. - Of the few copies of the first edition to have come to the market in recent decades, only two were in a contemporary binding. Apart from Vesalius's dedication copy to Emperor Charles V (Christie's New York, 18 March 1998, lot 213: $1,652,500), only a single other partly coloured copy was previously known, a list to which ours must now be added as the third known copy in contemporary colour. - Acquired in 2017; previously in a Tyrolean private medical collection, where the book rested for three generations (erased circular library stamp in the blank lower margin of the title page): an outstanding copy hitherto unknown to scholarship (cf. the recent census published by Dániel Margócsy, University of Cambridge, below; further relevant correpondence with Dr Margócsy is available upon request). Occasional waterstaining to margins, the splendid binding a little rubbed and bumped, but altogether a wonderfully crisp, wide-margined copy of the first edition. Unquestionably the most desirable copy of a milestone in the history of science still in private hands, and likely the most important medical book obtainable for decades to come.
¶ PMM 71. VD 16, V 910. Durling 4577. Cushing VI.A.1. Eimas 281. Norman 2137. Wellcome 6560. Graesse VI.2, 289. Cf. D. Margócsy, M. Somos, S. N. Joffe: "Vesalius' Fabrica: A Report on the Worldwide Census of the 1543 and 1555 Editions", in: Social History of Medicine Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 201–223. For Neefe cf. A. Lesser, Die albertinischen Leibärzte (Petersberg 2015), p. 71-74.

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Late copy of an unidentified map originating in mediaeval Persia or Muslim India
15

[World Map]. World map centered on the Arabian Gulf. Probably Northern India or Kashmir, late 18th century. 500 x 420 mm. Ink and watercolours on heavy Dutch laid paper (watermark: D & C Blauw IV), with site identifications labelled in Persian and embellished with polychromatic watercoloured decorations. Framed (63:71 cm).

EUR 75,000.00

Apparently a late copy of an as yet unidentified map originating in mediaeval Persia or Muslim India, showing some debt to the maps of the renowned geographers al-Bakri and al-Istakhri, and possibly to the Mughal map of Sadiq Isfahani. As in the early Greek conceptions of the world, the earth is encircled by an Okeanos-like river (the oblong shape possibly inherited from Posidonius); while the map uses no meridians, it does incorporate the Ptolemaic notion of the earth divided into seven climes. A great number of labels in Nastaliq script identify realms, shrines, cities, mountains, and even curiosities throughout the inhabited world. Remarkably, this map is generally oriented with the West at top, although the illustrations and several inscriptions at the outside of the map require the sheet to be rotated. At the centre is the Arabian (Persian) Gulf, extending towards the lower left following the coastline of Arabia, where the holy sites are clearly illustrated. Both India and Africa (the latter surprisingly diminutive) are indicated by charmingly drawn elephants. The earth is shown as an enormous mass of land crossed, mostly north-south, by several large streams (some of them easily recognizable as the Nile, the Euphrates, the Tigris, the Ganges, and the seven rivers of the Punjab). A continuous vertical (east-west) mountain chain, comprehensive of the Caucasus, the Central Asian highlands and the Himalayan mountains, forms a massive wall separating Northern Europe (where humans grow on trees, much as the Tarikh al-Hindi al-Gharbi showed them to do in the New World) and Asia (where snakes and a winged dragon dwell among burning rocks) from the more expansive southern regions. For all its fanciful elements and low degree of geographical accuracy, the map is of remarkable artistic quality, a curious fusion of age-old tradition with modern techniques of illustration and figural representation, executed in charming, vibrant colour on late 18th century western paper (numbered "No 95" in a contemporary western hand at upper left). - Folded; insignificant traces of wrinkling, but very clean and well preserved.

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