Islamic law, signed and dated by the calligrapher
1

Abu al-Barakat Hafiz al-din Abdallah b. Ahmad b. Mahmud al-Nasafi. Kanz al-daqua'iq fi'l-furu (Treasure of Niceties in the... Branches [of Jurisprudence]). N. p., 818 AH [1416 AD] N. p., 818 AH [1416 AD] Small folio (28 x 18 cm). 110 ff., manuscript on sturdy laid paper, written area 17.5 x 11 cm, 14 lines to the page, naskh script, black ink, captions in red, extensive marginal and interlinear glosses throughout. later Islamic leather binding with flap, covers cockled.

EUR 14,000.00

Early-15th-century manuscript of this famous manual on Islamic law by Abu al-Barakat Abdallah b. Ahmad b. Mahmud al-Nasafi (d. 710/1310), an important Hanafi legist and theologian, born in Nasaf in Sogdian (today's Qarshi in southern Uzbekistan). He taught in the Madrasa al-Kutbiya al-Sultaniya in Kirman, came to Baghdad in 710 and died in Rabi I 710 (August 1310), apparently upon his return journey to Idjadj (in Khuzistan), where he was buried. The book was originally an abridgment of his "al-Wâfi" and proved an excellent contribution to Islamic jurisprudence. "Kanz al-daqua'iq" remained one of the most reliable tracts on Hanafite law and was frequently consulted by fiqh scholars. It formed the basis of 27 commentaries (EI VII, p. 96; Brockelmann, GAL II, pp. 250-53). This mediaeval manuscript was calligraphed by Ahmad b. Amîr and is an extremely early specimen, written but a hundred years after the death of the author. - Upper margins browned; entries in Ottoman Turkish on the first leaf.
¶ Cf. GAL S II, 265.

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History of the Islamic Almoravid and Almohad dynasties in Spain and north Africa
2

Abu-Mohammed Assaleh el Abdel-Halim and José de Santo Antonio Moura (translator). Historia dos soberanos mohametanos das primeiras quatro dynastias... [...] annotada por Fr. Jozé de Santo Antonio Moura. Lisbon, Academia real, 1828. Lisbon, Academia real, 1828. 4to. [4], 454, [4] pp. Innocencio IV, 241. Contemporary motted sheepskin, gold-tooled spine, marbled endpapers.

EUR 1,250.00

First edition of the Portuguese translation of an Arabic historical work written by Abu-Mohammed Assaleh el Abdel-Halim. The work deals with the Almoravid and Almohad dynasties who ruled the southern part of Spain and the north-western part of Africa from the 11th up to the 13th century. Abu-Mohammed Assaleh mainly focusses on Morocco, Fes and Mauritania. Little is known about the author except that he lived in Granada, Spain, in the year 726 (1325/1326). The text was translated by the Franciscan Antonio Moura (1770-1840), probably from the original manuscript, and is perhaps the only translation of the original Arabic text, since no other translations could be found. - Browned throughout, with a few marginal waterstains and some occiasional small spots. Binding worn along the extremities. A good copy.
¶ Innocencio IV, 241.

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Medical secrets plus a largely imaginary Medieval European view of India
3

[Achillini, Alessandro]. Secreta secretorum Aristotelis. (Colophon: Lyon, Antoine Blanchard, 23 March) 1528. (Colophon: Lyon, Antoine Blanchard, 23 March) 1528. Including: (Pseudo-)Aristotle. Maximi philosophi ... de signis aquarum: & tempestatum. - (Pseudo-)Aristotle. Maximi philosophurum ... de mineralibus. - Alexander of Aphrodisias. De intellectu. - Averroes. De beatitudine anime. - Achillini, Alexander. De universalibus. - (Pseudo-)Alexander the Great. De mirabilibus Indie. Small 8vo (15 x 10.5 cm). With a title-page with a decorated woodcut border, woodcut printer's device on last page, 6 woodcut initials. Contemporary blind-tooled sheepskin (?) parchment over wooden boards, in a panel design, brass catch-plates and anchor-plates (straps and clasps lost).

EUR 11,500.00

Collection of seven treatises on medicine and philosophy, edited by Alessandro Achillini (1463-1512). Four of these are pseudo-Aristotelian works that had been well known since the 13th century or earlier. The "Secreta secretorum" is here present in the translatio of Philip of Tripoli; the "De signis aquarum, ventorum et tempestatum" on weather signs, was translated in the 13th century by Bartholomew of Messina; the third pseudo-Aristotle is "De mineralibus" on gems; the fourth, "Alexandri Macedonis ad Aristotelem de mirabilibus Indie", is a fictitious letter by Alexander the Great to his teacher Aristotle, describing the wonders of India and the East. Three other similar "Indian tractates" are known, all of them connected with the romance of Alexander the Great at various points in history. - The three remaining treatises in the present work consist of a work by Alexander of Aphrodisias on the intellect, another by Averroes on the beauty of the soul, and a work by Achillini himself on universals. - Very good copy, with very slight browning and a few marginal spots, lacking the final blank. Binding lacking straps and clasps, and with the (restored?) spine damaged.
¶ Baudrier V, 104. Stillwell 578. USTC 155810 (8 copies). Cf. Lach II, bk. 2, p. 94. Thorndike V, 47f.

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Six extremely rare hand-coloured lithographs of mounted horses, with their riders in traditional costumes
4

Adam, Jean Victor Vincent. Le tournoi études de chevaux & de costumes [...]. Cahier [...]. Paris, Berlin, London & New York, Goupil & Co., [1852-1854]. Paris, Berlin, London & New York, Goupil & Co., [1852-1854]. 6 large beautifully hand-coloured lithographed plates on wove paper (48 x 62.5 cm) by J. B. Zwecker after drawings by Jean Victor Vincen Adam and printed by Lemercier, numbered 8, 9, 12, 14, 16 and 17. Stored loosely in original publisher's printed wrappers, with a lithographed illustration showing the start of a tournament.

EUR 7,500.00

6 beautiful hand-coloured lithographed illustrations of mounted horses with their riders in traditional costumes, participating in tournaments in different settings. A separate instalment from an extremely rare print series by the French draughtsman Jean Victor Vincent Adam (1801-67), known for his illustrations of horses. No other copies of other issues or of the entire series of 24 plates could be located; only a few mentions in literature. - With the embossed publisher's stamp on each of the plates, a tear in the margins of a single plate, and the wrappers showing tears in the fold, otherwise in very good condition.
¶ Adhémar, Inventaire du fonds français après 1800, vol. 1, p. 64 (instalment of 6 irregularly numbered plates). Mennessier de la Lance I, 6 (note, no number of plates specified). Meyer, Allg. Künstler-Lexikon I, p. 75, no. 64 (whole suite of 24 plates). Not in Bridson & White; Colas; Hiler; de Jager (forthcoming); KVK/WorldCat; Nissen, ZBI; Podeschi.

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A classic on optics illustrated by Rubens
5

Aguilon, François de. Opticorum libri sex. Philosophis iuxta ac mathematicis utiles. Antwerp, Ex officina Plantiniana, widow & sons of Jan Moretus, 1613. Antwerp, Ex officina Plantiniana, widow & sons of Jan Moretus, 1613. Folio. With large woodcut printer's device on recto of last blank, engraved allegorical title-page by Pieter Paul Rubens, 6 allegorical half-titles engraved by Theodore Galle after designs by Rubens, and over 600 woodcut illustrations and figures in the text. Contemporary vellum.

EUR 29,000.00

First edition of a classic on optics and perspective by the Jesuit François de Aguilon (1566-1617). The work, one of the few books illustrated by Pieter Paul Rubens, is a landmark in Baroque book illustration and presents a master work in optics. Aguilon was charged with the project of organizing in Belgium the teaching of exact sciences useful in commerce, geography, navigation, architecture and military engineering, which led to the composition of the present "master treatise" (DSB) on optics that synthesized the works of Euclid, Alhazen, Vitellion, Roger Bacon, Pena, Ramus, Risner and Kepler. Of special and the greatest interest are the fine allegorical title, providing a series of ingenious references to the alliance of vision and reason, and the beautiful perspective designs at the heads of each part, all designed by Pieter Paul Rubens. Some professional restorations to binding; some slight traces of use. Fine copy of a classic on optics which influenced numerous 17th-century artists and scientists.
¶ De Backer & Sommervogel I, col. 90; DSB I, p. 81; Honeyman 43; Kemp, Science of Art, p. 101 ff., et passim; Poggendorff I, col. 18; Sotheran 43-44; cf. Exhibition Cat. P.P. Rubens als boekillustrator (Antwerpen 1977), pp. 21-26, 3a-3j.

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With a highly detailed map of the Gulf coast and the text of all the early treaties with the rulers of the Gulf
6

Aitchison, C[harles] U[mpherston] (ed.). A Collection of Treaties, Engagements and Sanads relating... to India and Neighbouring Countries [...]. Volume XII containing the treaties, &c., relating to Persia, the Arab Principalities in the Persian Gulf, and Oman. Revised and continued up to the 1st June 1906. Calcutta, Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909. Calcutta, Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909. 8vo. (2), X, 244, (2), CLXXXVII, (1), XLII pp. With tables and a folding map of Persia and the Northern Gulf in a lower cover pouch. Contemporary half calf. Includes: Volume XIII, containing in a lower cover pouch a reduced version of F. F. Hunter's map of the Gulf (123 x 90 cm).

EUR 65,000.00

Forming part of the fourth edition of this important government-issued series (incorporating revisions to 1906), this 12th volume records, most importantly, the treaties made with the tribes of the Arabian Gulf - the Wahhabis, the territory of Bahrain, and the so-called "Maritime Tribes" of the Arabian coast, or the "Trucial Arab Chiefs". A lengthy introduction (pp. 137-155) gives a detailed overview of the geopolitical situation in the Gulf area from the viewpoint of the British Government in the early 20th century, including an account of the "Kawasim, who have occupied the province of Sir from the earliest times", and their supposed previous involvement with piracy and the plunder of British vessels (which the editors, curiously, principally blame on the influence of the "turbulent sect" of the Wahhabis, who supposedly had drawn the Qawasim "into the[ir] piratical projects"). The treaties paint a vivid picture of the political relations between the increasingly dominant British Government and the independent tribes who ruled the Gulf coast. Significantly, the contemporary rulers and their territories (in then-current spelling: "Shargah", "Ras-ool-Kheimah", "Ummool-Keiwey", "Debay", "Ejman", and "Aboo Dhebbee") are noted by name. Of principal importance is the agreement of peace between "Sheikh-ul Mus Sheikh Ameer Sultan bin Suggur, bin Kashid, Joasmee", and the East India Company, signed at Bandar Abbas on February 6th, 1806, whereby the EIC and the Sultan declared to honour their respective flags, property, dependents and subjects. This is followed by the Preliminary Treaty with Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi, signed at Ras-al-Kaimah on January 6th, 1820 (following General Keir's controversial 1819 expedition to the Arabian Gulf), by which the Sultan agreed to surrender "towers, guns, and vessels which are in Shargah, Imam, Umm-ool-Keiweyn, and their dependencies"), and by similar treaties with the other Sheikhs of the coast. The General Treaty that followed established "a lasting peace between the British Government and the Arab tribes", a "cessation of plunder and piracy by land and sea" and - famously - the design of the "Blood-Red Arab Flag", as it has been called, "a red flag in a border of white, the breadth of the white in the border being equal to the breadth of the red, known in the British Navy by the title of white pierced red" (with a black-and-white printed illustration in the margin). Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi signed the treaty at midday on Friday, the 4th of February 1820. Also contained is the text of the agreements entered into by Sultan bin Saqer on April 17th 1838, July 3rd 1839, and April 30th, 1847 (for the prevention of the slave trade), of the ten-year Maritime Truce signed on June 1st 1843 by Sultan bin Saqer and the other Sheikhs of the Arabian coast, and the ensuing Treaty of Peace in Perpetuity which was entered into in 1853. Later documents include the translation of a letter from Salem bin Sultan Al Qasimi to the British monarch's resident in the Gulf (1873) and an agreement for the prohibition of traffic in arms signed by Sheikh Saqer bin Khalid of Sharjah in November 1902. - In addition to the map of Persia, the volume was intended to include a map of the "Principalities of the Persian Gulf, etc., Oman, Turkish Arabia, Aden, South Coast of Arabia", but this was not completed in time for publication (instead, a slip of paper was inserted before the title page announcing that this was to be be "sent later"). The said map was then issued with the 13th and final volume, which is included in the set. This is a reduced version of the famous "Hunter Map", the first issue of which had just been released with the Gazetteer of the Gulf. - Edges somewhat rubbed, but a well-preserved, good copy. Provenance: formerly in the library of the Bohemian Foreign Office; later in that of the Institute for Foreign Politics, Hamburg.
¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 18.

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Key work of the Arab astrologer
7

Albumasar (Abu Ma'shar al-Balkhi Ja'Far ibn Muhammad). Introductorium in astronomiam Albumasaris abalachi octo continens libros... partiales. (Venice, Giacomo Penzio for Melchiorre Sessa, 5 Sept 1506). (Venice, Giacomo Penzio for Melchiorre Sessa, 5 Sept 1506). 4to (210 × 150 mm). 64 unnumbered ff. With woodcut illustration on title, woodcut initials, astrological figures in the text, printer's mark on final leaf verso; complete with final blank. 19th-c. vellum with red and black morocco labels and gilt centre tools to spine.

EUR 25,000.00

An attractive edition of this key astrological work. Of all the Arabic writers on astrology, the most imposing is Ja'far ibn Muhammad Abû Ma'shar al-Balkhî (c. 787-886), known in the West as Albumasar. The most notable astrological work ascribed to him is the "Prediction of Changes of Years and Births". A manuscript in Cairo titled "Kitab Akham al-Qiranat wa'l Kawakib wa'l Buruj al-Ithnay 'Ashra" (Book of Indication of Conjunction and Corrections of Stars with some other Stars) is very probably the same work (cf. B. A. Rosenfeld and E. Ihsanoglu, Mathematicians, Astronomers and other Scholars of Islamic Civilisation and their Works [Istanbul, 2003], no. 88, p. 34). This 12th-century Latin translation by John of Seville of his "al-Madkhal al-kabir ilá 'ilm ahkam al-nujum" (Great Introduction to the Science of Astrology) was first published at Augsburg, 1489. - Upon Sessa's well-known device, the famous bibliophile Bishop of Ely, John Moore, remarked: "Whenever you see a book with a cat and a mouse in the frontispiece, seize upon it: for the chances are three to four that it will be found both curious and valuable" (Fumagalli, 486). - Small early inkstamp on title; ms. index to binder's blanks at end; some early marginalia and underlinings in two distinct hands. Bookplate of William Stirling-Maxwell (1818-78), the Scottish historical writer, statesman, horse breeder, and collector. Vellum insignificantly darkened with dust, the occasional trivial mark internally; overall an excellent copy.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 822. Adams A 567. Isaac 12913. Gaselee, Early printed books in Corpus Christi Cambridge, 166. Graesse I, 60. Heritage Library, Scientific Treasures, p. 30.

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Horse riding in Italy, illustrated
8

Alessandro, Giuseppe d', duca di Pescolanciano. Pietra paragone de' cavalieri, [...] divisa in cinque libri. Naples, Domenico-Antonio Parrino, 1711. Naples, Domenico-Antonio Parrino, 1711. Folio (332 x 218 mm). With engraved frontispiece, portrait of the author, and 140 engravings, all but one full-page.

EUR 25,000.00

First edition of this rare Italian riding school, covering all aspects of horse breeding, training and care, lavishly illustrated with 140 engravings. A second, enlarged edition, also apparently rare, was published in 1723 under the title "Opera". The work is divided into five parts: the first, "Regole di cavalcare" with one plate; the second, "[...] ove si tratta del difficilissimo mestiere dell' imbrigliare"; the third, "[...] dell' istesso", with 95 illustrations of bits, etc.; the fourth, "Disegni de' circoli" with 10 diagrams and "Ritratti d'uomini illustri" with 27 portraits, about half of which show mounted figures; the fifth, "[...] intorno alla preservativa, conservatione, e medicina per cavalli" with 7 plates, also including other animals (such as a rhinoceros). - Errata leaf at beginning, contemporary vellum, manuscript lettering on spine, some leaves browned or spotted. No copy in auction records of the last decades.
¶ Huth p. 28. Brunet I, 159. Graesse I, 68.

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Two seminal works of Arabic astronomy in their first and second (greatly revised) editions
9

Al-Farghani (Alfraganus), Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Kathir. Continentur in hoc Iibro. Rudimenta astronomica Alfragrani. [AL-BATTANI,... Muhammad ibn Jabir]. Item Albategnius De motu stellarum, ex observationibus tum propriis, tum Ptolemaei, omnia cum demonstrationibus geometricis & additionibus Joannis de Regiomonte. [REGIOMONTANUS, Johannes]. Item Oratio introductoria in omnes scientias mathematicas Ioannis de Regiomonte, Patavii habita, cum Alfraganum publice praelegeret. Eiusdem utilissima introductio in Elementa Euclidis. [MELANCHTHON, Philipp]. Item Epistola Phillippi Melanthonis nuncupatoria, ad Senatum Noribergensem. Omnia iam recens prelis publicata. Nürnberg, (colophon [2f6]: Johann Petreius), 1537. Nürnberg, (colophon [2f6]: Johann Petreius), 1537. With 29 woodcut diagrams and letterpress tables. With: (2) Ricci, Agostino. De motu octavae sphaerae, opus mathematica, atq[ue] philosophia plenum. [...] Eiusdam De astronomiae autoribus epistola. Paris, Simon de Colines, 1521. 2 editions in 1 volume, the first in 2 parts. 4to (205 x 155 mm). Both set in roman types, including small caps. Contemporary blind-tooled calf. Binding badly damaged and spine reinforced with paper at an early date.

EUR 65,000.00

Two rare early editions of important astronomical works, the first combining two major Arabic works on planetary astronomy in Latin translation: the first edition of Kitab az-Zij (on the motions of the stars and particularly the planets) by al-Battani (ca. 850-929) and the second edition of Kitab fi Jawami 'Ilm al-Nujum (an overview of the material in Ptolmey's Almagest with additions and corrections by the Arabic astronomers) by al-Farghani (ca. 800/05-ca. 870), here published for the first time with Regiomontanus' additions and geometrical proofs. Battani was "one of the most influential astronomers of the early Islamic period. [...] The accuracy of Battani's observations of equinoxes and solstices [...] is not much inferior to that of Tycho Brahe 700 years later". His measurements of Ptolemaic solar eccentricity are "clearly better than the values found by Nicolaus Copernicus [...] and Brahe". - "The indebtedness of Copernicus to al-Battani is well known. He quotes him fairly often [...] Much more frequent references to him are found in Tycho Brahe's writings and in G. B. Riccioli's 'New Almagest'; in addition, Kepler and [...] Galileo evidence their interest in al-Battani's observations" (DSB). Al-Farghani's work was not published in Arabic until 1669, and Battani's not until the 19th century, so European knowledge of his work came largely through the present edition. Together with the second edition of Agostino Ricci's "De motu octavae sphaerae", covering both spherical geometry and kabbala. The present edition is also an important work typographically. Colines was one of the pioneers who introduced Italian Renaissance typography to France, a movement that established many of our present idioms and was to culminate in the 1530s with books in the roman types of Claude Garamont and other great masters. With an early purchase (?) inscription on the front paste-down and a note on the blank verso of the last leaf, but with owners' names removed from the title-page, leaving an abrasion and faint stain. Further with a tear in one leaf and some marginal stains, but otherwise internally in good condition and with generous margins. The binding is badly damaged, with most of the upper layer of the calfskin covering on the front board and spine and parts of that on the back board lost. The sewing is somewhat loose but remains attached to the sewing supports. Two important early astronomical editions.
¶ I: Houzeau/L. 764 ("fort rare"). VD 16, A 1202. Zinner 1655. - II: Houzeau/L. 2355. For al-Battani and al-Farghani cf. DSB I, 507-516 & IV, 541-545.

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Al-Idrisi's geographical account of northern Africa
10

Al-Idrisi, Muhammad / Joannes Melchior Hartmann (transl.). Africa. Göttingen,, Johann Christian Dieterich, 1796. Göttingen,, Johann Christian Dieterich, 1796. 8vo. Slightly later black half goatskin.

EUR 4,500.00

Second edition of a Latin translation of a work on the geography of Africa, written by the Islamic geographer and botanist Muhammad al-Idrisi (1100-1165). It deals specifically with the geography of northern Africa, Egypt and the Sahara desert, covering its soil, cities, population, mountains, deserts, rivers and monuments. Al-Idrisi also mentions various travel routes from one city to the other. Around 1138, al-Idrisi was invited to the court of the king of Sicily, Roger II, who asked him to map the world as it was then known. This map is now lost, but Roger II also asked for supplemental texts to comment on the map. "Emissaries were sent far and wide, and from the information they brought back the Kitab al-Rojari [Book of Roger] was compiled, and completed by January 1154" (Howgego). Various manuscripts containing (parts of the) Kitab al-Rojari have survived, and the present translation was based on one of them. The present work was translated and edited by the Johannes Melchior Hartmann (1764-1817), who worked from a medieval Arabic manuscript at the University of Jena. - With a library stamp. Somewhat browned and foxed throughout. Binding worn at hinges and along the extremities. Otherwise in good condition.
¶ Gay 345; Howgego, to 1800, I5; not in Atabey; Blackmer.

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108 original watercolours, documenting excavations in Cairo
11

Alisi, Antonio, art historian (1876-1954). Majoliche e Vetri Arabi. Cairo, 1916. Cairo, 1916. Folio (330 x 250 mm). Autograph manuscript with 108 original watercolours. Contemp. blue cloth with gilt stamped label to title.

EUR 7,500.00

The present manuscript, assembled during the author's visit to Egypt in 1916, documents Islamic ceramics of all kinds (vases, lamps, figurines, plates, glasses, etc.), mostly from archaeological excavations in Fostat near Cairo. Antonio Alisi was a renowed expert on Islamic art, director of the Capodistria Museum and later appointed head of the International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza. - Title and most watercolours signed by Alisi. Includes somes correspondence and manuscript material by the author. - Well preserved.

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Elaborately decorated and illustrated Islamic prayerbook
12

[Al-Jazuli, Muhammad ibn Sulaiman]. Islamic Prayerbook. [Dala'il al-khayrat (Tokens of beneficial deeds)]. [Ottoman Empire]., 1199 AH [1784/1785 AD]. [Ottoman Empire]., 1199 AH [1784/1785 AD]. Small 8vo (14.5 x 10 cm). Arabic manuscript prayerbook written in black ink in a neat naskh Arabic hand, with well over 50 headings in red, the opening of the main text decorated with a floral design, 2 full-page perspective views in coloured inks showing the Masjid al-Haram (the Great Mosque) in Mecca, with the Ka'ba in its central plaza, and the al-Masjid an-Nabawi (the Prophet's Mosque) in Medina, about 25 calligraphic roundels, the Prophet's handprint and footprint, several calligraphic seals, 4 pages each with 3 flags, about 20 other pages with pictorial or semi-pictorial images with calligraphic inscriptions, numerous other inscriptions in circular borders and nearly every page in a rectangular border. Richly gold-tooled, tanned sheepskin(?) (ca. 1815?) with a flap that wraps around the fore-edge, rebacked.

EUR 18,500.00

A richly decorated Islamic prayerbook in Arabic with extensive pictorial, semi-pictorial and floral decoration and calligraphic roundels, executed in the Ottoman Empire in 1199 AH (1784/85 AD). The Dala'il al-khayrat (sometimes translated as Proofs of good deeds or Waymarks of benefits) is a prayerbook invoking peace and blessings for the prophet Muhammad. It was written and compiled by Muhammad ibn Sulaiman al-Jazuli (807-870 AH or 1404/05-1465 AD), a Moroccan scholar in the mystical Islamic Sufi movement, and became one of the most popular Islamic prayerbooks, especially in the Ottoman Empire. al-Jazuli's inspiration for the prayerbook is said to have come before he left Fez for forty years in Mecca, Medina and Jerusalem, but he finalized it in Fez in the last years of his life. Some of the illustrations traditionally included in the book, including the views of the Mecca and Medina mosques, were added after his death. Many of the "illustrations" comprise texts written within a gold outline with the form of a vase, long-necked bottle, pair of trees, sword, etc., the whole in a rectangular border with a coloured background. A few are more pictorial, showing the Ka'ba, a dallah (coffee pot) and other items. - With a chip in the first leaf, just touching the text, a couple leaves torn along the border and many bifolia separated at the gutter fold, some water damage at the foot of the gutter margin and a few minor stains and tears (some repaired). The text and pictorial imagery in most leaves nevertheless remains in very good condition. The binding shows some wear, mostly at the extremities, but the rest of the tooling remains in good condition. An elaborately decorated and illustrated Islamic manuscript prayerbook from the 18th-century Ottoman Empire.

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Arabian astrology, printed in 1482: the art of foretelling the destinies of newborns
13

Al-Qabisi, Abu Al Saqr 'Abd Al-'Aziz Ibn 'Uthman Ibn 'Ali (Alchabitius). Libellus ysagogicus. Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 16. I. 1482. Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 16. I. 1482. 4to. 32 ff. Title page printed in red and black. With 2 woodcut diagrams and 8 tables in the text; white-vine initials in two sizes, lombardic initials (many coloured in red). Rubricated. Recent full vellum.

EUR 45,000.00

Second edition of the author's principal work, originally published at Mantua in 1473. Al-Qabisi (also known as "Alchabitus" in the Latin tradition) flourished in Aleppo, Syria, in the middle of the 10th century. Although his education was primarily in geometry and astronomy, his principal surviving treatise, "Madkhal" (here in the Latin translation of Joanis Hispalensis prepared in 1144), is an introductory exposition of some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy (the astrological science of casting nativities, or divination as to the destinies of newborns). The "Madkhal" in its Latin version was published many times in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. - Bookplate of joint collectors Rudolf Hugo Driessen (1873-1957) and Caroline E. F. Kleyn (1883-1933). Outer margin of first leaf slightly frayed; marginal annotation in red ink on its verso (slightly trimmed by binder's knife). Very rare; last sold at an international auction in 1996.
¶ HC 616*. Goff A-362. GW 843. Essling 294. Sander 216. Sajó-Soltész 120. Walsh 1804. Oates 1747. Proctor 4382. BMC V 285, XII, 19. BSB-Ink A-232. Cf. Scientific Treasures, p. 31 (ed. 1512).

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14 surgical instruments illustrated
14

Al-Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya / Arcolano, Giovanni (ed.). Commentaria in nonum librum Rasis ad regem Almansore[m]... [...]. Accedit opusculum De fluxibus alui suo loco restitutus [...]. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1542. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1542. Folio. (12), 509, (3) pp. With woodcut printer's device on t. p., different device on final leaf, and woodcut illustrations of various surgical tools at the end of the preliminaries. Contemp. limp vellum with ms. title to spine.

EUR 12,500.00

Rare edition of this commentary on the ninth book of the treatise dedicated by ar-Razi (also known as Rhazes; 850-923 or 932) to Almansor, the Prince of Chorosan (with the text). "The manual, known as 'Nonus Almansoris', was popular among mediaeval physicians" (cf. GAL S I, p. 419). The work discusses special pathology but excluding pyrology and was one of the most popular textbooks at medical schools and faculties well into the Middle Ages (cf. Hirsch/H. I, 171). Rhazes is considered the greatest mediaeval physician next to Avicenna; he also conducted alchemical experiments. According to his biographer al-Gildaki, he was blinded for refusing to share his secrets of chemistry. - A woodcut on the final page of the preliminaries depicts 14 different surgical instruments, including a tongue depressor, a forceps, and various instruments for cauterization. Occasional slight brownstaining, but a good copy from the library of the Sicilian physician Blasio Cucuzza, with his ownership on the final page (calling him the "most learned of all Sicilian physicians in Modica, Ragusa and Syracuse") and additional note dated 10 May 1622.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 2340. Wellcome I, 383. Durling 250. M. H. Fikri, Treasures from The Arab Scientific Legacy in Europe (Qatar 2009) no. 46, with double-page spread illustration on p. 82f.

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All the Ottoman Sultans
15

Al-Shidyaq, Ahmad Faris. Abda` ma-kan fi suwar Salatin Al `Uthman. Album... des Souverains Ottomans. Istanbul, Matba`at al-Jawaib & Garte in Leipzig, [c. 1885]. Istanbul, Matba`at al-Jawaib & Garte in Leipzig, [c. 1885]. Small 4to. Lithographed title page and index; 34 photo-lithogr. plates, hightlighted in gilt and red. Original red and gilt cloth.

EUR 12,500.00

Only edition of this lavishly produced series of portraits showing the Ottoman Sultans from the 14th to the 19th century. Captioned in French and Arabic. The editor, Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq (1804-87), was born in Lebanon to an Arab Maronite family. He converted to Islam in 1860 and spent much of his later life in Istanbul as the editor of an Arab language newspaper, "El-Jawa’ib". In recent years, scholars seem to have taken a renewed interest in Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq and his role in the "nahda", or Arab renaissance of the 19th century. Several biographies have been published recognizing his struggle to modernize the Arabic language and educational system, as well as his defence of Arabic culture and language against the Turkization movement across the 19th century Ottoman Empire. As such he is considered one of the founders of modern Arabic literature and journalism. - Minor foxing to reverse of plates, otherwise in perfect condition.
¶ OCLC 15623629.

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Three letters written in 1539 about the Ottoman threat in the Mediterranean
16

Alvarez de Toledo, Pedro and Maria Osorio y Pimentel. Three letters to Ferrante Gonzaga, Viceroy of Sicily,... two from Pedro Alvarez de Toledo and one from his wife Maria Osorio y Pimentel. Andria (in the Kingdom of Naples), 13 August to 10 September 1539. Andria (in the Kingdom of Naples), 13 August to 10 September 1539. Folio (215 x 300 mm). (4); (4); (2) pp. including blanks. (1) Letter in Italian, signed, from Pedro Alvarez de Toledo in Andria to Ferrante Gonzaga, 13 August 1539, with a 23 mm seal bearing Alvarez de Toledo's coat of arms (with a chain of flags) stamped on a slip of paper attached with red wax. (2) Letter in Spanish, signed, from Pedro Alvarez de Toledo in Andria to Ferrante Gonzaga, 3 September 1539, with the 45 mm imperial armorial seal stamped on a slip of paper attached with red wax. (3) Letter in Italian, signed, from Maria Osorio y Pimentel [in Andria] to Ferrante Gonzaga, 10 September 1539, with the remains of what appears to be her husband's 23 mm red wax seal. - Each letter, in brown ink, occupies one page, with the last page containing the address and the sender's seal. The two inside pages of the second and third letter are blank. Each formerly folded for posting, so that the address would have appeared on one side and the seal on the other.

EUR 15,000.00

Three letters from Pedro Alvarez de Toledo (1484-1553), Duke of Alba and councillor to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, and his wife Maria Osorio y Pimentel (1498-1539) to Ferrante Gonzaga (1507-57), Viceroy of Sicily, who commanded the Imperial cavalry fighting the Ottomans in North Africa. They concern the Ottoman fleet marauding in the Mediterranean in 1539, thirteen years after the Ottoman victory at the Battle of Mohács gave them control of much of Hungary and roused Christian fears of their strong presence in Europe, and ten years after Barbarossa established his base in Algiers. The first letter, signed by Alvarez de Toledo, advises Gonzaga that, due to the recent loss of Castelnuovo to the Turks, he has given orders for vigilance and defensive preparations on the island of Lipari. He asks Gonzaga to supply any assistance the islanders require. The second letter, also from Alvarez de Toledo, advises Gonzaga that he has received a letter dated 30 August 1539 from Andrea Doria (1466-1560) in Brindisi, then Imperial admiral of the Holy League, urging a campaign against Barbary to be carried out forthwith, in order to avoid further damage from the Turks. This followed the defeat of Doria's fleet at the battle of Preveza in September 1538 by the fleet commanded by the Ottoman admiral Hayreddin Barbarossa (ca. 1478-1546), long feared in Europe as the infamous privateer Redbeard. The third letter is addressed to Gonzaga by Osorio y Pimentel, informing him that her husband has sent news that the Turkish fleet has been sighted off the Capo d'Otranto, some 150 sails having been observed. She also notes that she has informed Francisco de Tovar, governor of the port La Goleta at Tunis. Given that Barbarossa may direct his attention there, she requests that Gonzaga send a frigate to Tunis to warn de Tovar to remain vigilant. - The seal on Osorio y Pimentel's letter is damaged and can no longer be made out, but the faint visible traces appear to match the arms and flags of her husband's seal, and a small part of the imperial seal on his second letter is damaged, but all three letters are still in very good condition. Three letters of 1539 all important primary sources for hostilities between the Ottoman Empire and Christian Europe.

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German edition of the earliest detailed account of Ethiopia, with woodcut illustrations
17

Alvarez, Francisco. General Chronica, das ist: Warhaffte und kurtze Beschreibung... vieler namhaffter und zum theil bis daher unbekannter Landtschafften. Frankfurt, Joh. Schmidt, Sigmund Feyerabend, 1581. Frankfurt, Joh. Schmidt, Sigmund Feyerabend, 1581. Folio. 3 Teile in 1 Band. (4), 144 (letztes weiß) Bll. mit 32 Holzschnitt-Abbildungen, 94, (2), 45 (3) (letztes weiß) Bll. Blindgeprägter Schweinslederband mit Holzdeckeln und 1 Metallschließe.

EUR 25,000.00

Sammlung von 3 Drucken von Feyerabend, jeder mit eigenem Titel (mit 1 Titelabb.). Der erste Druck ist eine Übersetzung der berühmten Reiseerzählung von Francisco Alvarez (ca. 1470-1540), der die portugiesische Expedition unter Rodrigo de Lima nach Äthiopien in den Jahren 1520-26 als Kaplan begleitete. Diese Gesandtschaft wurde durch ein Schreiben der äthiopischen Kaiserin Helena, der Großmutter Lebna Dengels ("Priester Johannes"), veranlaßt. Die Reise führte 1520 von Massaua nach Schoa, und sie erreichten über Dabra Libanos das Lager Lebna Dengels bei Taguelat. Alvarez machte zumindest vier Reisen nach Schoa, ehe er 1526 Äthiopien nach Indien verließ. Nach Ramusio war dies der erste Bericht über Äthiopien und sollte zumindest für ein Jahrhundert die wichtigste Quelle über das Land bleiben. 1540 erschien die erste Auflage in Portugiesisch, die jedoch nur einen Teil der verschollenen 5 Bücher von Alvarez darstellt. Alvarez beschreibt die kirchlichen Einrichtungen des Landes, darunter die Felsenkirchen, aber auch die Städte und die Landwirtschaft werden beschrieben. Die historische Geographie verdankt ihm die Erzählung über die Invasion der Somal und Galla. Alvarez berichtet auch über die Länder rund um das Gebiet des Priester Johannes, z. B. Danakil und Godjam. Leider konnte Alvarez keine kartographischen bzw. topographischen Ortsbestimmungen durchführen, dennoch blieb sein Einfluß auf die Kartographie bis auf die Zeiten d'Anvilles und J. Bruces sichtbar (vgl. Henze I, 62ff.). Vorangestellt sind 2 Briefe von Andrea Corsal, die bereits 1516 veröffentlicht wurden. Der Florentiner Corsal beschreibt hier (auf 24 Bll.) vor allem das Gebiet der Roten Meeres, Südarabien (Beschreibung von Aden, Hormuz, Bahrein, Sokotra, Muskat, Oman), Indien, Äthiopien, Persien (Stadt Balsera, Sophi König) und Malacca. - Einband leicht berieben, eine Metallschließe fehlt. Titel mit restauriertem Ausriß, alte Besitzvermerke am Titel und Vorblatt, 1 kl. Wurmlich auf 35 Bl. (jeweils 1 Zeile betreffend), nur leicht gebräunt. Insgesamt ein sehr gutes Exemplar.
¶ Kainbacher 15f; Lockot 711, 732; Gay 186; Sabin 974. Cox I, 3 und 22. Gay 3321 (frz. Ausgabe). Der 2. Druck ist eine Übersetzung der Welthistorie von Orosius. Der 3. Druck ist eine Übersetzung des Textteiles von Ortelius Weltatlas in der Ausgabe 1580. - Schweiger 622 (Orosius), nicht bei Adams.

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Early Life of the Prophet
18

Andrés, Juan. Confusione della setta macomettana: dalla quale s'intende l'origine... di Macometto, & suoi fatti, et la falsa, et stolta dottrina da lui ritrovata. Venice, Gio. Battista Ugolino, 1597. Venice, Gio. Battista Ugolino, 1597. 8vo. 71 ff. (lacking final blank). All edges sprinkled in red. Contemporary limp blue boards.

EUR 6,500.00

Last Italian edition of the 16th century: a famous account of Islam (with a life of the Prophet Muhammad) given by a Muslim convert to Christianity, first published in Spanish in 1515 and frequently reprinted and translated. The author gives his former name only as Alfaqui ibn Abdallah from Játiva near Valencia in Spain; he flourished 1487-1515. - Some browning and brownstaining throughout due to paper; a few pages waterstained; old ink notes to title page (some ink corrosion). Rare; only two copies in WorldCat (Paris-BnF and Mazarine); four in Italy (Venice, Prato, Modena, Messina); none in the U.S.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 1728. Chauvin XII, p. 21, no. 83. Göllner 2280. I.A. 105.567. Palau 12175 (note). OCLC 800261833.

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Maritime atlas of the Middle East, Africa, Indian Ocean, East Indies, Far East and South Pacific: a magnificent display of colonial power ca. 1780
19

Après de Mannevillette, Jean-Baptiste d'. Le neptune oriental. Paris, Antoine Guénard Demonville; Brest, Romain-Nicolas Malassis, 1775. Paris, Antoine Guénard Demonville; Brest, Romain-Nicolas Malassis, 1775. With: (2) Supplément au neptune oriental. Paris & Brest, 1781. 2 text vols. bound as one, plus atlas volume. Folio (55 × 42 cm). With engraved frontispiece and 72 large engraved nautical charts (33 double-page and 39 single-page, plate sizes between 50 × 68 and 48 × 35 cm). Uniform contemporary mottled, gold-tooled calf, with the crowned French royal arms on each board and "Conseil de la Marine" below it on each front board. Rebacked, with most of the original backstrips laid down. - (3) Instructions sur la navigation des Indes orientales et de la Chine, pour servir au Neptune oriental. Paris & Brest, 1775. - (4) Supplément au Neptune oriental. Paris & Brest, 1781. Large 4to (26 × 21 cm). 2 vols. bound as one. Maroquin-pattern sheepskin (ca. 1840?), gold-tooled spine.

EUR 75,000.00

Greatly expanded second edition, plus the rarer posthumous supplement published a year after the author's death, of one of the greatest maritime atlases in the history of French cartography, devoted to exotic regions (the Middle East including the Gulf, the African coasts, the Indian Ocean and East Indies, Southeast Asia, parts of the Chinese coast, and the Pacific islands). Each section starts with a large territorial overview map and closes in on particular areas in the subsequent charts. The Arabian Peninsula is first displayed on a large overview map showing the coasts along the Indian ocean, which is followed by a chart of the Arabian Sea, and separate charts of the coasts along the entry to the Red Sea, the complete Red Sea, the area of Jeddah and the Arabian Gulf. - The "Neptune" was compiled by Jean-Baptiste-Nicolas-Denis d'Après de Mannevillette (1707-80), hydrographer to the French navy, supported by the French East India Company and the Académie des Sciences. "It was at once hailed as a major achievement and welcomed by navigators throughout the world" (Cat. Nat. Mar. Mus.). D'Après continued to improve and expand it for the rest of his life, serving as director of the Company's nautical chart publishing office from 1762. It is rare that one finds two copies of the Neptune Oriental with the same make-up, but the present copy shows its full extent immediately after the death of D'Après. The whole is not only a magnificent collection of sea charts, but also an essential key to understanding European colonial power in the late eighteenth century. - The present copy of the Neptune may have first belonged to the Secrétairerie d'État. In 1806 Napoleon revived the Conseil de la Marine, which had been replaced by the Secrétairerie d'État in 1723, so those words must have been added in 1806, as would the bookplates. - Condition: a couple of charts slightly browned (one of them also with an unintended crease), a few pages in the Instructions (mostly in its supplement) with a marginal worm trail, and the occasional very minor hole or spot, but generally in very good condition (most leaves of the Instructions fine). The Neptune has been expertly rebacked as noted, with the loss of parts of the backstrips, but the bindings are very good otherwise. A splendid maritime atlas, beautifully bound for the French Navy.
¶ Neptune: Cordier, Sinica 134 (without 1781 suppl.); Cat. Nat. Mar. Mus. 204 (without 1781 suppl.; see also 203 for 1745 ed. & 205 for 1821 suppl.); Howgego A107; Phillips & Le Gear 3166 (without 1781 suppl.), 3167 (with 1781 suppl. but only 69 charts) & 3168 (1781 suppl. alone); Polak 127 & 4562; Shirley, British Library M.APR-1c, d & e (all without 1781 suppl.; e without title-page). Instructions: Howgego A107 (without 1781 suppl.).

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20

Après de Mannevillette, Jean-Baptiste d'. Routier des côtes des Indes Orientales et de... la Chine. Paris, Ch. J. B. Delespine, 1745. Paris, Ch. J. B. Delespine, 1745. Large 4to (203 x 260 mm). (6), LVIII, 254, (2) pp. Title-page printed in red and black. With an engraved headpiece. Contemporary full calf, spine rebacked and gilt to style. Leading edges gilt, all edges sprinkled in red. Marbled endpapers.

EUR 4,500.00

Extremely rare pilot guide to the East Indies, reduced to a single quarto volume from the author's great "Neptune Oriental", published simultaneously. One of the greatest maritime atlases in the history of French cartography, the "Neptune" was devoted to exotic regions (the Middle East including the Gulf, the African coasts, the Indian Ocean and East Indies, Southeast Asia, parts of the Chinese coast, and the Pacific islands). It was compiled by Jean-Baptiste-Nicolas-Denis d'Après de Mannevillette (1707-80), hydrographer to the French Navy, supported by the French East India Company and the Académie des Sciences. "It was at once hailed as a major achievement and welcomed by navigators throughout the world" (Cat. Nat. Mar. Mus.). Of the present text-only reduction, OCLC lists no more than nine copies worldwide, only one of which in the the U.S. (University of Chicago). - Corners bumped; modern spine gilt in 18th-century style. A good, wide-margined copy. Provenance: 1) From the library of Sir Francis Lindley Wood, 2nd Baronet, of Barnsley (1771-1846), with his bookplate on the pastedown. 2) By descent to his son Charles Wood, 1st Viscount Halifax (1800-85), sometime Chancellor of the Exchequer, with handwritten ownership on the flyleaf. As President of the Board of Control of the English East India Company, Sir Charles Wood was instrumental in spreading education in India. 3) Acquired from the Portuguese trade.
¶ Jöcher/Adelung II, 622. OCLC 41102601. Not in Cordier (Sinica), Brunet, Graesse, etc.

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Incunable on poisons, using various Arabic sources
21

Ardoynis, Santes de. De venenis. Venice, Bernardino Rizzo for Johannes Dominicus de Nigro, 19. VII. 1492. Venice, Bernardino Rizzo for Johannes Dominicus de Nigro, 19. VII. 1492. Folio (420 x 280 mm). (4), 101, (1) ff. Later calf with gold- and blind-tooling.

EUR 45,000.00

First edition of a work on poisons, compiled by Sante Arduino (or Ardoini) of Pesaro. "[T]he elaborate compendium on poisons in eight books which Sante Ardoini of Pesaro compiled in the years, 1424-1426, from Greek, Arabic and Latin works on medicine and nature, and which was printed at Venice in 1492, and at Basel in 1518 and 1562. … Although Ardoini quotes previous authors at great length, his work is no mere compilation, since he does not hesitate to disagree with such medical authorities of Peter of Abano and Gentile da Foligno, and refers to his own medical experience or observation of nature at Venice and to what fisherman or collectors of herbs have told him. He also seems to have known Arabic, and his occasional practice of giving the names of herbs in several Italian dialects is of some linguistic value" (Thorndike). Arduino makes extensive use of the works by Avicenna (Ibn Sina), who "held a high place in Western European medical studies, ranking together with Hippocrates and Galen as an acknowledged authority" (Weisser). Among the numerous other sources he used are Galen, Avenzoar (Ibn Zuhr), Rasis (al-Razi), Andromachus, Albucasis (Al-Zahrawi), Serapion the Younger and Dioscorides. - A very good copy, with only a few marginal waterstains. Binding slightly rubbed along the extremities and with a few scratches on boards.
¶ Hain-Copinger 1554. Goff A-950. Ohly-Sack 233. Walsh 2186. Proctor 4963. BMC V, 403. GW 2318. Thorndike III, 545. ISTC ia00950000.

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Astrological medicine, covering the theory of critical days as introduced by Galen into the Arabic world
22

Argoli, Andrea. De diebus criticis et ægrorum decubitu libri duo. Padua, Paulus Frambottus, 1652. Padua, Paulus Frambottus, 1652. 4to. [8], 6, [2], 371, [1 blank], [11] pp. With ca. 230 letterpress diagrams in text. Contemporary stiff paper wrappers, manuscript title on spine.

EUR 5,000.00

Second edition of Argoli's work on astrological medicine, divided into two "books", the first covering the doctrine of critical days - "The critical days in their Arabic garb had a long life: the doctrine first appears in Kitab ayyan al-buhran (On the Critical Days), which is an Arabic translation of Galen's De diebus decretoriis by Hunayn Ibn Ishaq al-Ibadi, and continues in the medical worjs of al-Razi, Haly Abbas, Avicenna, and others"(Ibn Ezra) - and the second provides "prognostica" that allowed an astrologer to tell whether a disease would be curable, long, or chronic, based on observations made by the ancients. Argoli often refers to the works of Galen and Hippocrates (Boqrat). - With an occasional line underscored and some lines ticked off in the outer margin. Binding slightly soiled, but otherwise very good. Corners of the first few leaves slightly thumbed, a minor waterstain in the last few leaves, and a minor tear in the title-page; a very good copy, wholly untrimmed.
¶ ICCU 002335; Thorndike VII, pp. 122-124; for the author: DSB I, pp. 244-245; cf. Ibn Ezra, Elections, interrogations, and medical astrology (2011), pp. 24-25.

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Dictionary of Persian and Arabic for English East India Company merchants in India
23

Barretto, Joseph. A dictionary of the Persian and Arabic languages. Calcutta, S. Greenway, India Gazette Press, 1804-1806. Calcutta, S. Greenway, India Gazette Press, 1804-1806. Two volumes. (v), iv, 570 pp. (ii), 921 pp. (1 blank). With 2 title-pages using decorated and shaded roman and italic capitals and decorated swelled rules. Set in roman, italic and Arabic type (nashk for the Arabic and nastaliq for the Persian). A very good set attractively bound in twentieth century calf.

First and only edition of a rare and very extensive dictionary of Persian and Arabic, giving definitions in English: a remarkably early example of printing in these languages in Calcutta and one of the earliest books printed anywhere in one of the best early Arabic types in the nastaliq style, favoured for Persian. Each entry in the dictionary begins with the Arabic word in nashk or Persian word in nastaliq, followed by a transliteration in italic and the definition in English, set in roman type. The Mughal Empire promoted Persian as the language of culture in India in the 16th century and it remained until officially replaced by English in 1832. Many Islamic and Armenian Christian merchants in the international trading centres of India and the East Indies also used Persian as a lingua franca. The present dictionary includes Arabic words not for communication in Arabic but because they were often used as loan words in Persian, so the Persian and Arabic words appear in a single alphabetical series. The preliminaries show alphabets of the nashk and nastaliq types side by side for comparison to help the beginner distinguish the Arabic from the Persian words. The book was intended for practical use by merchants of the British East India Company and other English speakers in India, the East Indies and perhaps also in Iran. Joseph Barretto junior (ca. 1776?-1824) was born in Calcutta to an Indian mother and a wealthy Portuguese merchant father. Joseph Barretto senior (1750-1824?) came to Calcutta from Macau in 1775 and served as Calcutta agent for his family's insurance firm before setting up on his own in 1806. Joseph junior appears to have married his cousin Rozalin, daughter of Luis Barretto de Souza, around 1798. He was granted arms in 1813 and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in London in 1818, whereupon he presented the Society with the present dictionary and his 1806 Persian and Arabic dictionary in the Persian language (Shums-ool-loghat, or A dictionary of the Persian and Arabic languages, sometimes confused with the present volume 2). Joseph junior was a partner in his father's firm, which traded as Joseph Barretto and sons from at least 1817 and financed many East India Company ventures. In 1820 Lord Viscount Torrington noted that efforts to get Joseph junior a seat in parliament "had only been defeated because of Barretto's skin colour" and Barretto tried unsuccessfully to get one of "the Company's seats" in the House of Commons in 1821. After Joseph junior's death his son Luis Joseph was a partner in the firm, but it collapsed in 1828. We wonder if references to Joseph senior's death in 1824 result from confusion with Joseph junior. Printing in Arabic was much more common than printing in Persian, and Arabic books usually used the nashk style of Arabic script most common in Arabic manuscripts. Most early printed books in Persian therefore usually used the nashk Arabic types, sometimes with additional sorts, even though the nastaliq (or talik) style of Arabic script was generally preferred in Persian manuscripts. The fluid forms of the nastaliq probably made it more difficult to render in type as well. The Propaganda Fide in Rome had published an Alphabetum Persicum [ 1633?], the first known work printed in nastaliq Arabic type, but their printing for missionary work did not satisfy the needs of merchants and others trading with Persian-speakers and for many years no other press had nastailq type. Charles Wilkins, printer to the British East India Company at Calcutta, therefore produced a nastaliq type for Francis Balfour, The forms of Herkern, Calcutta, 1781, and Balfour's preface seems to suggest it was the first nastaliq type outside the Propaganda Fide, though he does not mention that press by name. Although we have not been able to directly compare the type of the present book with other early examples, it appears not to match Wilkins's and appears to match the Paragon (about 20 point) nastaliq of the London typefounder Vincent Figgins, cut under the direction of William Owseley, the first nastaliq used in England. Owseley's 1797 advertisement shows one line of the new type in preparation, Figgins issued a specimen of it in 1800 and Owseley's book set in the type appeared in 1801. This identification is supported by the fact that most of the present book's decorated and shaded titling capitals appear in Figgins's 1801 specimen. The printers of the present dictionary, used to newspapers and short books, became confused with their quire signatures. They more or less followed an eccentric system of their own, but with frequent irregularities. The present copy is clearly complete, however, and the pagination is more or less regular. - With a small hole in 1 leaf of volume 2 affecting 3 words of the text, a few small restorations in the preliminaries, and small and mostly marginal tears in about 5 leaves. Otherwise in good condition, with an occasional even smaller hole not touching or barely touching the text, minor browning along the edges of some leaves and a page number or quire signature very slightly shaved in 2 or 3 leaves. A pioneering dictionary for English merchants (mostly from the East India Company) trading with Persian-speakers.
¶ COPAC (7 copies). Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London, 108 (1818), p. 527. Vater/Jülg 25. WorldCat (4 copies). not in Schnurrer. For Greenway: Graham Shaw, Printing in Calcutta, p. 50.

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One of the oldest modern sources to describe Arabia
24

Bartholomeus Anglicus (Bartholomaeus de Glanvilla). Liber de proprietatibus rerum Bartholomei Anglicus. Strasbourg, Georg Husner, 14. II. 1485. Strasbourg, Georg Husner, 14. II. 1485. Folio. 299 leaves (of 300, lacking last blank). 47 lines plus headline in two columns, gothic letter, rubricated. Later (19th century) full vellum (with the use of older vellum for spine and front cover).

EUR 28,000.00

Early printing of Bartholomew's work, containing one of the oldest modern sources to describe Arabia. - This medieval encyclopedia, entitled "On the Order of Things", is thought to have been composed circa 1245 in Saxony. Book XV, "De provintiis" (more commonly referred to as "De regionibus"), is one of the earliest textual witnesses for the term "Arabia" describing the region today identified by that name, a highly important document for the cultural heritage of the peninsula. While Anglicus' "De regionibus" proposes to explore only those countries mentioned in the Bible, Patrick Gautier-Dalché has recently commented that, in fact, the work goes far beyond this promised aim. Thorndike emphasizes Anglicus's geographical modernity: in addition to the place names of antiquity, he notably includes "the feudal world of his own time" (p. 424), while Pitts notes the work's "intentional avoidance of Christian moralization". Places as far afield as China and Scotland are included, with the 173 entries arranged alphabetically. "On the whole his account […] is of considerable value for the political geography of Europe in the thirteenth century, both as a general survey showing what regions he deemed important enough to mention and what he thought might be omitted, and also often for particular details concerning particular places, while it is sometimes enlivened by the spice of local or racial prejudice" (p. 425). - Anglicus was evidently indebted to Isidore of Seville for the 'etymological' organisation of his dictionary, but while the latter is frequently referenced as a source in "De proprietatibus rerum", Anglicus's compendium represents an important step forward in the organization and presentation of information about the known world. In particular, "De regionibus" goes into much greater detail than does Isidore's geography, discussing the geographical lay of the land as well as the physical and moral character of its inhabitants. Agricultural products and occasionally man-made products are noted. Anglicus's observations are sometimes even medical in nature - for example when he points out that the inhabitants of Burgundy are especially prone to scrofula and gout. - Bartholomaeus Anglicus (c. 1200-70) was supposedly born in England, possibly attending Oxford University during the early 13th century. The first definite record of him is as an instructor in Paris in 1224, where he had joined the newly-formed Franciscan Order. In 1230 Anglicus journeyed from France to Saxony to take up a teaching position and support missionary efforts on Europe's eastern frontier. Most scholars agree that "De proprietatibus rerum" was composed in Magdeburg before 1250. - Inner margin of leaf a1 reinforced; a long tear in leaf z6 professionally repaired. Occasional browning and some marginal staining (more pronounced in the final 20 leaves). A few old marginal annotations or underlinings; contemp. ownership "Lazarus Censorinus" at end of index. Old catalogue description clipped and mounted to pastedown, with note in Swedish and bookplate of Carl Sahlin.
¶ H 2506 = 2511. Goff B-138. GW 3410. Proctor 592. Ohly-Sack 394f. BMC I, 132. ISTC ib00138000.

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Inscribed by the editor
25

Baumgarten auf Breitenbach, Martin von. Peregrinatio in Aegyptum, Arabiam, Palaestinam, & Syriam [...].... Studio et opera M. Christophori Donaveri, Ratisponensis. Nuremberg, Paul Kauffmann, 1594. Nuremberg, Paul Kauffmann, 1594. 4to. (4), 173, (3) pp. With the author's woodcut arms on verso of title page. Modern full calf with giltstamped red spine label. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.

EUR 18,000.00

Rare: the first and only separate edition of one of the most important early descriptions of a journey through the Middle East. An English edition appeared in Churchill's "A Collection of Voyages and Travels" in 1704, a Russian edition was published in 1794. Martin von Baumgarten (also: Baumgartner, 1473-1535) from Breitenbach in Austria visited the Middle East from April 1507 to July 1508. He set off from Kufstein to Venice, then travelled via Croatia to Corfu, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Palestine, Damascus and Beirut, then back to Cyprus and returned to Kufstein by the same route. His account includes a report on the dexterousness of the Arabian youths in handling boats, of the capacity for swimming among the Arabs, and of Muslim circumcision. "The account of his travels was compiled from his diary and that of his servant" (Cox) by the Regensburg theologian Christoph Donauer (1564-1611), who also provides a biography of Baumgarten in the preface. - Upper hinge and slight paper flaw to fol. E4 professionally repaired. At the foot of the title page, the present copy is inscribed by Donauer to the Regensburg senator Georg Sigmund Hamman (1562-1627): "Ornatissimo viro, domino Georgio Siegismundo Hammano etc. compatri meo dilecto offero M.C.D." (the initials written as an elegant humanist monogram). An appealing copy.
¶ VD 16, B 914. BNHCat, B 165. Röhricht 579 (p. 167). Tobler 65. Blackmer 95. Cox, I, 223. Howgego B49. Cobham-Jeffery 3. Gay 36. Aboussouan 71. Not in Atabey.

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Rare work on falconry and cormorant fishing
26

Belvallette, Alfred. Traité de Fauconnerie et d'Autourserie suivi d'une étude... sur la pêche au cormoran. Evreux, Imprimerie de Charles Hérissey, 1903. Evreux, Imprimerie de Charles Hérissey, 1903. Large 8vo. (12), 269, (3) pp. With 35 plates and numerous illustrations in text. Modern red half sheepskin, with the original publisher's printed wrappers bound in.

EUR 2,750.00

Rare first and only edition of a work on falconry, followed by a short treatise on cormorant fishing by Alfred Belvallette, "well known in France as a skilful falconer, and he writes with a thorough knowledge of his subject … "French falconers apply the term fauconnerie only to flights with the long-winged hawks (Peregrine, Merlin, Hobby, and Jerfalcon), flights with the short-winged Goshawk (autor) and Sparrow-hawk (épervier) coming under the expressive and very convenient term autourserie" (Bibl. accipitraria). The work partly contains original illustrations, including many photographs of falconers in action, but also copies of Schlegel and others. - Belvallette is best known for his earlier work "Traité d'autourserie" (1887), the present work includes this topic as well, but is not included in Bibl. accipitraria and Schwerdt. - With only a couple of spots, otherwise in very good condition.
¶ Thiebaud 66. Cf. Bibl. accipitraria 219; Schwerdt I, 59. WorldCat (9 copies).

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Early 19th century reports on the coastal settlements between Abu Dhabi and Ajman
27

Berghaus, Heinrich. Geo-hydrographisches Memoir zur Erklärung und Erläuterung der reduzirten... Karte vom Persischen Golf. Gotha, Justus Perthes, 1832. Gotha, Justus Perthes, 1832. 4to. (4), 50 pp. Forms part of: Asia. Sammlung von Denkschriften in Beziehung auf die Geo- und Hydrographie dieses Erdtheils; zur Erklärung und Erläuterung seines Karten-Atlas zusammengetragen. 1832-1836. 7 parts in all. With a lithographed map of Syria. Period black marbled papered boards with a green paper title label in manuscript.

First edition. A detailed discussion of the Arabian Gulf coast in the early 19th century, with chapters on "the environs of the Mussendom promontory", "The Arabian coast between Ras Sheikh Monsud and Shaum", "The Pirate Coast", "The coast of danger between Debai and Eas Reccan", "Islands in the great bay between Debai and Ras Reccan", "Bahrein and its environs", and "The coast between Katif-Bey and the mouth of the Shatt al-Arab". Includes details on pearl fishing and notes on all the coastal settlements, today forming the United Arab Emirates: "Amelgawein", "Aymaun", "Shargah", "Debai" ("the inhabitants belong to the Beni Yass tribe and number some 1200 persons [...] Pearling yields an annual revenue of 20-30,000 dollars [...] The only freshwater springs are in the three small date gardens beyond the city"), and "Abuthubbi or Buthabin, a city with a small fortress", etc. - Published as part of a "collection of articles relating to the geography and hydrography of Asia". The other six parts of this rare work include a cartographical analysis of India, the Philippines, Assam, Bhutan, Syria, Arabia and the Nile, and the Himalaya. H. K. W. Berghaus (1797-1884) "is most famous in connection with his cartographical work. His greatest achievement was the 'Physikalischer Atlas' (Gotha, 1838-48), in which work, as in others, his nephew Hermann Berghaus (1828-90) was associated with him" (Wikipedia). - Foot of spine shows chipping of marbled paper, but overall a very good copy.
¶ Macro 532. Not in Gay.

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The second book printed in Arabic from movable type and a primary source for Columbus’s second voyage to America
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[Biblia polyglotta - Psalmi]. Psalterium Hebreum, Grecu[m], Arabicu[m], & Chaldaicu[m], cu[m] tribus... latinis i[n]terp[re]tat[ion]ibus & glossis. Genoa, Pietro Paulo Porro, 1516. Genoa, Pietro Paulo Porro, 1516. Folio (binding 250 x 335 mm, inner book 236 x 327 mm). 200 leaves, complete. Title printed in red and black within woodcut arabesque border, printer's device on final leaf. With parallel text in Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Arabic and Chaldaean (in their respective types), 4 columns to a page, 41 lines. 13 woodcut floriated initials (5 Latin, 4 Hebrew, 2 Greek and 2 Arabic). Rebound in near contemporary brown calf, carefully restored, edges and corners repaired, spine fully rebacked in seven compartments with modern gilt title and date.

EUR 85,000.00

First edition. - The first polyglot edition of any part of the Bible, and also the first polyglot work ever published. It is of the utmost importance in several further respects, constituting the second book printed in Arabic from movable type (following Gregorio de Gregorii's "Kitab salat as-sawa'i", a Horologion for the Lebanese Melchites, printed in 1514), as well as the earliest Arabic printing of any portion of the Bible. It also contains the first edition of the Aramaic text of the Psalter and offers for the first time Kabbalistic texts from the Zohar. Furthermore, Giustiniani’s commentary provides the first substantial biographical reference to Columbus, and is thus noted as an Americanum. - The learned Dominican Agostino Giustiniani (1470-1536) was Bishop of Nebbio in Corsica from 1514 and later became the first Professor of Arabic and Hebrew at Paris. On his death he bequeathed his extensive library to the state of Genoa. He edited, supervised and financed the present edition and also wrote the commentary. - His book is the first multilingual edition of any part of the Bible. Aldus Manutius had planned a Psalter in three languages as early as the late 15th century, but his project was not realised. Printed in eight parallel columns on double pages, Giustiniani’s work comprises the text in Hebrew, a literal Latin translation thereof, the Latin Vulgate, the Greek Septuagint, Arabic, Aramaic (Chaldee), a literal Latin translation from the Aramaic, and scholia in the same languages. While Giustiniani aimed to edit the entire Bibel in this form, no further sections were published. He described his difficulties in selling the edition in his History of Genoa (1537), recording an edition size of 2,000 paper copies and 50 copies on vellum. - Giustiniani’s extensive commentary includes a long note to Ps. 19:4 ("et in fines orbis omnia verba eorum"; C7r-D1r), about the Genoese Christopher Columbus, who had died in 1506, containing previously unpublished information on his second voyage: "In this interesting sketch of the life and voyages of his fellow-townsman, Bishop Giustiniani gives an interesting account of the discovery of the new world, and states some facts not mentioned elsewhere" (Sabin). - This edition is also the only book printed at Genoa in the 16th century. The Milanese printer Pietro Paulo Porro maintained a press at Turin with his brother Galeazzo. Giustiniani summoned Porro to Genoa especially for the production of this edition, and had set up a press in the house of his brother Nicolo Giustiniani Paulo. The types were designed and cut for this edition under Porro’s direction. - Mild browning throughout, with some occasional waterstaining (more pronounced near beginning).
¶ Adams B 1370. Darlow/Moule 1411, 1634 & 2401. Smitskamp, PO, 236. Alden-Landis 516/4. Harrisse, BAV no. 88 (pp. 154-158). Sabin 66468. Sander 5957. G. Roper, Early Arabic Printing in Europe, in: Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution. A Cross-Cultural Encounter (Westhofen 2002), pp. 129-150, at p. 132, with colour ill. IV.

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29

[Biblia arabico-latina - Evangelium]. Arba`at Anajil Yasu` al-Masih Sayyidina al-Muqaddasah. Sacrosancta quatuor... Iesu Christi D. N. Evangelia. Arabice scripta, Latine reddita, figurisq[ue] ornata. Rome, Typographia Medicea, (1591)-1619. Rome, Typographia Medicea, (1591)-1619. Folio (260 x 366 mm). (4), 9-462, (2) pp. Title page printed in red and black, with the Medici arms. With 149 text woodcuts by L. N. Parassole after Antonio Tempesta. Contemporary Italian flexible boards with ms. title to spine.

EUR 18,000.00

The rare first re-issue, with new preliminary matter only, of the first Gospel printing in the interlinear Arabic and Latin version, prepared at the same time and printed by the same press as the first Arabic-only Gospel. These were the first works ever produced by Ferdinando de' Medici's "Medicea" press, founded by Pope Gregory XIII to spread the word of Christ in the Orient. Supervised by the able scholar Giovambattista Raimondi (1536-1614), its strength lay in oriental, especially Arabic, printing. After Raimondi's death, the press relocated to Florence. - The Arabic text is printed in Robert Granjon's famous large fount, generally considered the first satisfactory Arabic printing type; as all early printed editions of the Arabic Gospels, it is based on the Alexandrian Vulgate (cf. Darlow/M. 1636). The Latin version is by Leonardo Sionita. As issued in 1591, the work began with page 9, without a title page or any preliminary matter at all: "the intended prefatory matter was apparently never published" (Darlow/M.). The 1619 re-issue contains 4 pages of preliminary matter (title page and a note "typographus lectori"); there exist copies with two additional leaves of dedications not present here. Another re-issue, much more common, was released in 1774. - Occasional browning; a good, untrimmed and hence wide-margined copy in its original temporary binding.
¶ Darlow/Moule 1643. Mortimer 64 (note). Streit XVI, p. 866, no. 5138.

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Scholarly editions of numerous Arabic and other "oriental" manuscripts, edited by Silvestre de Sacy and others, attractively bound
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Bibliothèque Royale. Notices et extraits des manuscrits de la Bibliothèque... du Roi [(vols. 1-3); Bibliothèque Nationale (vol. 4); Bibliothèque Nationale et autres bibliothèques (vols. 5-7), Bibliothèque Impériale et autres bibliothèques (vols. 8-9); Bibliothèque du Roi, et autres bibliothèques (vols. 10-14)], ... Tome premier[-quatorzième]. Paris, 1787-1843. Paris, 1787-1843. 14 volumes, some in 2 parts. 4º. With woodcuts on title-pages; occasional illustrations, including folding plates (at least 1 hand-coloured), to show facsimiles of manuscripts, maps, miniatures, etc.; some texts (for example Manchu in vol. 13) printed in red and black. Set in roman and italic type, with extensive use of the printing office's extensive collection of non-Latin types (Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Samaritan, Syriac, Armenian, Sanscrit, Mongolian, Manchu (a variant of the Mongolian), Tibetan, Chinese and perhaps more). Uniform tree sheepskin (ca. 1835-ca. 1845), richly gold-tooled spines.

EUR 12,500.00

First editions of the first 14 volumes of the officially authorized publications of the manuscripts of the French Bibliothèque du Roi and it successors, with commentaries and notes by leading French authorities, such as Antoine Isaac, Baron Silvestre de Sacy (1758-1838), the leading orientalist of his day, for the many Arabic manuscripts and several other non-Latin manuscripts. Louis-Mathieu Langlès (1763-1824), Armans-Pierre Caussin de Perceval (1795-1871) and others also made important contributions. Many volumes begin with the "oriental" manuscripts (those in non-Latin scripts) in a separate part. In one folding plate (showing an Arabic text) many vowel points and some letters have been rendered in outline and hand-coloured in red, apparently to show where the editor has filled out the original. These were important pioneering studies of Arabic and other non-European texts and also serve to display the materials of the printing office, which had one of the world's largest collections of matrices for non-Latin types. Many of the types were cut exclusively for the printing office and Napoleon confiscated others from the Propaganda Fide in Rome soon after he declared himself King of Italy in 1805. With the bookplates of the Bibliothèque de Mouchy and Bibliothèque du Château de Mouchy-Noailles. The former is probably from Charles-Arthur-Tristan Languedoc de Noailles (1771-1834), Duc de Mouchy, and/or his younger brother Antonin (1777-1846), who succeeded him as Duke. With a few water stains in the first leaves of vol. 1, but generally in very good condition. The bindings of several volumes are slightly tattered, but most are in good condition. A remarkable and important set of scholarly editions of manuscripts, especially strong in Arabic and other non-Latin manuscripts.
¶ Cat. de la bibliotheque du Chateau de Mouchy (1872), item 2461 (this copy).

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