A milestone of science, from the library of the Nuremberg humanist Joachim Camerarius
1

Agricola, Georg. De re metallica. Basel, J. Froben and N. Episcopius, 1556. Basel, J. Froben and N. Episcopius, 1556. Folio. (10), 538 (but: 502), (74) pp. With 2 (1 folded) woodcut plates and about 280 woodcut illustrations and diagrams in text, partly full-page. Contemporary vellum with ms. title to spine. Edges in blue.

EUR 65,000.00

First edition of "the first systematic treatise on mining and metallurgy, and one of the first technological works of modern times" (PMM), an immaculate copy with outstanding provenance. Dealing with "everything connected with the mining industry and metallurgical processes, including administration, prospecting, the duties of officials and companies, and the manufacture of glass, sulphur and alum" (PMM), Agricola's main work paved the way for further systematic study of the earth and of its rocks, minerals, fossils, refinery and oil. Illustrated with 2 plates (one folding) and more than 280 woodcuts in the text attributed to Hans Rudolf Manuel Deutsch (1525-72), some very large, showing the different stages of the extraction and transformation of metals. - From the library of the famous German physician and botanist Joachim Camerarius the Younger (1534-98) with his autograph ownership to the title page ("Joachimo Joach[imi] F[ilio] Camerario"; the Morgan Library holds another book from his library with an identical inscription, cf. Accession no. PML 129904) and a very few underlinings and marginalia most likely also in his hand. Unidentified 18th c. engraved bookplate with the motto "similare nescit" on verso of title. Acquired from the library of Werner Habel, with his stamp, signature and acquisition date (1977) to front pastedown. First and final pages very lightly brownstained in the edges, otherwise clean and crisp throughout. Complete with the two inserted plates following page 100. A very appealing, wide-margined copy in its first binding.
¶ PMM 79. Adams A 349. Sparrow (Milestones of Science), 4 and pl. 26.

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Surgical instruments illustrated
2

Al-Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya (Rhazes) / Arcolano, Giovanni (ed.). Omnes, qui proximis seculis scripserunt, medicos longe excellentis... opera [...]. In quibus sunt & commentarii in Razis Arabis nonum Lib. ad regem Almansorem [...]. Basel, Heinrich Petri, 1540. Basel, Heinrich Petri, 1540. Folio (225 x 331 mm). (12), 747, (1) pp. With 2 (repeated) woodcut printer's devices to title page and final page as well as a half-page woodcut of surgical instruments at the end of the preliminaries. Modern blindstamped brown calf on four raised double bands.

EUR 9,500.00

Rare edition of this commentary on the ninth book of the treatise dedicated by ar-Razi (also known as Rhazes; 850-923 or 932) to Almansor, the Prince of Chorosan (with the text). "The manual, known as 'Nonus Almansoris', was popular among mediaeval physicians" (cf. GAL S I, p. 419). The work discusses special pathology but excluding pyrology and was one of the most popular textbooks at medical schools and faculties well into the Middle Ages (cf. Hirsch/H. I, 171). Rhazes is considered the greatest mediaeval physician next to Avicenna; he also conducted alchemical experiments. According to his biographer al-Gildaki, he was blinded for refusing to share his secrets of chemistry. - A woodcut on the final page of the preliminaries depicts ten different surgical instruments, including a tongue depressor, a forceps, and various instruments for cauterization. Several minor waterstains throughout, but generally a fine copy. Provenance: Handwritten ownership of the Jesuit College of Louvain, dated 1637, on the title page.
¶ VD 16, A 3222. Durling 249. Cf. Garrison/M. 3666.84; Poletti, p. 11; Wellcome I, 383; M. H. Fikri, Treasures from The Arab Scientific Legacy in Europe (Qatar 2009) no. 46, with double-page spread illustration on p. 82f. (1542 Venice edition).

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Editio princeps - the first printing of the Arabian Nights in any language, the earliest Western translation and the most influential version of Alf Layla Wa-Layla
3

[Alf layla wa-layla – French]. Les Mille et Une Nuit [sic]. Contes arabes,... traduits en François par Mr. Galland. Lyon, Antoine Briasson, 1709-1719. Lyon, Antoine Briasson, 1709-1719. 8vo. 6 vols. (24), 312 pp. (8), 352, pp. (12), 322 pp. (12), 323, (1) pp. (6), 228 pp. (6), 456 pp. Contemporary mottled calf, gold-tooled spines on five raised bands, gilt labels to spines, red sprinkled edges.

EUR 55,000.00

The first six volumes of the original edition of the Arabian Nights, considered unobtainable in all twelve volumes as published by Antoine Galland from 1704 onwards. Of the utmost rarity: not a single copy of any of the original issues (even separate volumes or incomplete sets) traceable at auction or in the trade within the last decades; even the Bibliothèque nationale de France holds only an incomplete set (lacking vol. 3, cf. FRBNF33486572), while all but four (Univ. of Indiana, UCLA, Princeton, and Newberry) of the 91 entries in OCLC refer either to separate volumes or incomplete sets. The Newberry (OCLC 919637686) and Princeton copies seem to be identical with ours, describing the imprint as "Lyon, chez Antoine Briasson" dated 1709-17 (Princeton: 1706-20). The twelve volumes initially appeared over a period of 13 years, but due to their immense popularity the separately published volumes were reissued multiple times by their original three printers in Paris and Lyon, and so all known sets - complete or incomplete - are made up of various issues of the original edition. "With our present knowledge, we cannot distinguish those reissues or tell whether any real differences entered into them" (Macdonald, 388). Pirated editions, too, appeared at once in Holland; only in 1726 did a distinctive second edition appear in six volumes (Chauvin 21B: "recherchée en raison de l'extrême rareté de l'édition originale"). - The collation of the preliminaries of the first volume of our set follows precisely the description given by Macdonald (388f.): after the dedicatory letter to the marquise d'O, the "Avertissement", and the table for the entire volume we find the "Approbation" and "Privilège de roi" (as mentioned on the title page), identifying this as the original first edition. The two lines printed at the bottom of the royal privilege, not found in Macdonald's copy, shed some light on the complex process of changing imprints for individual volumes even while the legitimate first edition of the Arabian Nights was being published (which Chauvin admits to have found confusing): "Et la dite Veuve Barbin à fait part de son Privilège à Antoine Briasson, Librairie de Lyon, suivant leur traite du 5 Mars 1705". - Uniform, contemporary bindings only slightly rubbed and scuffed at the edges; interior clean and spotless throughout. A genuine, charming copy of one of the greatest rarities of world literature, removed from an as yet unidentified noble library, with small heraldic ownership stamp to each title-page and contemporary handwritten ownership "D. Rossi" on pastedowns.
¶ D. B. Macdonald, A Bibliographical and Literary Study of the Appearance of the Arabian Nights in Europe, in: The Library Quarterly 11, 1932, p. 398f. Chauvin, IV, 25f.

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An Innocent Arab Proposing the Destiny of the Universe
4

Allaeus, Franciscus. Astrologiae Nova Methodus. Francisci Allaei, Arabis Christiani. [Rennes, Julian Herbert], 1654[-1655]. [Rennes, Julian Herbert], 1654[-1655]. Folio (235 x 360 mm). (4), 4, 12 pp. 57, (1) pp. 26 pp., terminal blank. With 1 engraved disc in the text of the first count (a repeat of disc 2 of the first volvelle), 3 volvelles in the first section, composed of 11 parts; and 2 volvelles in the second section, composed of 6 parts (all but two stitched together, but inserted loosely, never sewn into the book). Contemporary full vellum.

EUR 25,000.00

Rare second, expurged edition of this remarkable treatise offering predictions for the destiny of European nations, issued without place or printer in the year of the almost unobtainable first edition, most copies of which were burned by the hangman at Nantes and Rennes shortly after publication. The first edition was deemed offensive due to the predictions of five volvelles in the second section which offered horoscopes for Islam, Christianity, France, Spain, and England. A "Figura Sectae Mahometanae" dared to give a horoscope of the Prophet Mohammed and a list of significant events in the history of Islam; this was followed by predictions which included the suggestion that a quarter of the world would be Islamic by 1703. The horoscope of Christianity also included dire predictions: indeed, those for the fate of England (ending with the wiping out of the English nation in 1884) caused a serious diplomatic rift, resulting in the English ambassador demanding the book be suppressed. The present edition of the "Astrologiae Nova Methodus" (and subsequent ones) omits the incriminated 7 pages and 5 volvelles; instead, it prefixes a new, two-page introduction entitled "Principiorum Astrologiae Brevis Expositio" ("The Principles of Astrology, Set Out in Brief"), which explains one of the movable discs in detail. - The book's authorship remains a mystery. It is attributed on the title-page to a certain Francisco Allaeio, "Christian Arab", but this is probably a pseudonym for Yves de Paris, a Capuchin monk known for his anti-establishment views. The third section of the work offers a religious justification for the relevance of astrological prediction, in which the author defends himself as an "innocent Arab proposing the destiny of the universe" (p. 5). - Endpapers not pasted to covers; some browning, fingerstaining and edge defects, but still a good, wide-margined copy. Uncommonly, none of the volvelles are sewn into the book, as they seem intended to be removable; two volvelles are not stitched together, though the discs are cut out. A 13-page typewritten German translation of the preliminary matter ("The Fate of the Author" and "The Principles of Astrology"), apparently the work of a German scholar of the 1930s with an attractive hand-drawn title page in red, yellow and black ink, is inserted at the end. - Provenance: 1) Heinrich Xaver Baron Wiser, minister of Palatinate-Neuburg at the court of Madrid in the 1690s and at Naples from 1709 to 1713 (his handwritten ownership to title); 2) Johann Oeler, legal advisor to the Barons Sturmfeder (his handwritten shelfmark and ownership, dated Mannheim, 24 Nov. 1806, on front endpaper); 3) Moritz (Carl August) Axt (1801-62), German classicist and educator (his handwritten ownership on flyleaf).
¶ Cf. Houzeau/Lancaster 5217. Caillet III, 11557. Thorndike VIII, 310ff. Peignot, Dictionnaire des livres condamnés au feu II, 204f. Dorbon-Ainé, Bibliotheca Esoterica, 61f.

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Inscribed by the author to Nobel
5

Allawerdi, Michael (Allah Wirdi, Miha'il Halil). Falsafat al-musiqa al-Sharqiyah. The Philosophy of Oriental Music. Damascus, Ibn Zeydoun, [1949]. Damascus, Ibn Zeydoun, [1949]. 4to. (60), 608, (2), 40, (4) pp. With portrait frontispiece after preliminaries. Contemp. green cloth. - Includes: The same. Arabism and Peace. 8, (4), 8 pp. Ibid., 1951. Printed wrappers. - And: The same. Typescript "Unification of the Language of Music and its Relation to World Peace". 4to. 5 ff. with occasional handwritten corrections. - And: collection of publisher's promotional leaflets on "The Philosophy of Oriental Music" in French and English.

EUR 2,800.00

First edition in Arabic, inscribed by the author to an unidentified member of the Swedish Nobel family: "Présenté par l'auteur à Mr. le Maître Gunar Nobel avec les meilleurs salutations [...] Damas 10.5.1952". The Syrian musicologist Allawerdi held that there were two basic forms of music: the oriental, natural one, based on the harmonic series, and the western, mechanical one, based on the tempered scale of 18th century instruments. While he associated the former with serenity and peace, he viewed the latter as artificial and complex, ultimately leading to restlessness, chaos, and war. Allawerdi strove to unify the "language of music" as a first step towards achieving world peace. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1951. - A good copy, including several of the author's further writings on the subject, one as an original authorial typescript.

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A famous tract against Islam
6

Alphonsus de Spina. Fortalitium fidei in universos christiane religionis hostes Judaeorum... et saracenorum [...]. (Lyon, Jean Moylin for) Etienne Gueynard, (11 Oct. 1525). (Lyon, Jean Moylin for) Etienne Gueynard, (11 Oct. 1525). Large 8vo. (8), CCCLXXI, (3) ff. Title printed in red and black with woodcut illustration and numerous woodcut initials and marginal illustrations repeated throughout the volume. Contemporary full calf over wooden boards with blind-tooled ornaments and remains of clasps, rebacked in the 19th century with new spine and marbled endpapers. Remains of clasps.

EUR 9,500.00

This "Fortress of the Faith, against all the enemies of the Christian religion, restraining the rage of Jews and Muslims", written c. 1458, is the principal work of the baptized Spanish Jew de Spina. It is considered the "methodical and ideological foundation of the Inquisition. The book, divided into five chapters, targets chiefly Jews and Muslims" (cf. LMA I, 408f.). Of the five books, "the first [is] directed against those who deny the Divinity of Christ, the second against heretics, the third against the Jews, and the fourth against Islam and the Muslims, while the fifth book treats of the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell. In this last book the author dwells at length upon the demons and their hatred of men; the powers they have over men and the diminution of these powers, owing to the victory of Christ on the Cross, the final condition of the demons, etc." (Catholic Encyclopaedia). "Ouvrage fort curieux de ce théologien espagnol [...] il était dit-on d'origine juive, c'est pour cela que son 'Fortalicium' pèut ètre classé dans une bibliothèque kabbalistique" (Caillet). Part 3, on the iniquities of the Jews, is a veritable encyclopaedia of mediaeval antisemitic libel, containing numbered lists of Jewish "cruelties" and refutations of the Jews' supposed anti-Christian arguments. The section on Islam lists the numerous Saracen wars, while the fifth book is devoted to the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell and its resident demons, whose population the author calculates at over 133 million. - Block loosened in places. Clasps missing; binding rubbed but original blind-tooling of boards remains recognizable, even though partly obscured by the 19th century leather that replaced the spine. A fine post-inculabular edition, the final one to appear, embellished with numerous woodcut illustrations.
¶ Adams S 1593. BM-STC French 170. Coumont (Witchcraft) S84.7. IA 103.849. Caillet 10306 ("Incunable gothique rare").

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Early Life of the Prophet
7

Andrés, Juan. Confusione della setta macomettana: dalla quale s'intende l'origine... di Macometto, & suoi fatti, et la falsa, et stolta dottrina da lui ritrovata. Venice, Gio. Battista Ugolino, 1597. Venice, Gio. Battista Ugolino, 1597. 8vo. 71 ff. (lacking final blank). All edges sprinkled in red. Contemporary limp blue boards.

EUR 6,500.00

Last Italian edition of the 16th century: a famous account of Islam (with a life of the Prophet Muhammad) given by a Muslim convert to Christianity, first published in Spanish in 1515 and frequently reprinted and translated. The author gives his former name only as Alfaqui ibn Abdallah from Játiva near Valencia in Spain; he flourished 1487-1515. - Some browning and brownstaining throughout due to paper; a few pages waterstained; old ink notes to title page (some ink corrosion). Rare; only two copies in WorldCat (Paris-BnF and Mazarine); four in Italy (Venice, Prato, Modena, Messina); none in the U.S.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 1728. Chauvin XII, p. 21, no. 83. Göllner 2280. I.A. 105.567. Palau 12175 (note). OCLC 800261833.

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British Intelligence reports on the Peninsula, hitherto inaccessible with no copy recorded in OCLC
8

(Banks, Donald). Field notes on Sa’udi Arabia 1935. Confidential. Promulgated... for the information and guidance of all concerned. By Command of the Air Council. London, Air Ministry, August 1936. London, Air Ministry, August 1936. 8vo (255 x 160 mm). 173, (1) pp. With 18 large, folded maps, plans and panoramic views in colour (measuring up to 750 x 780 mm), 2 plates showing Arab soldiers, and the map of Peninsula (775 x 915 mm) in the rear pocket. Sewn between original printed boards, as issued.

EUR 95,000.00

Classified as a secret document at the time of issue, never reprinted and still almost unobtainable, the present field notes remain the most important single source of geographical, historical, sociological, statistical and historical material on Saudi Arabia, gathered immediately after the formation of the Kingdom from 1932 onwards. While also covering Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah and the other territories "open towards an undefined Sa'udi frontier" and ruled by "six independent Shaiks of the eastern coast of Arabia" (p. 50f.), the present volume was compiled with the main intention of providing British agents and policymakers in the Arabian Peninsula, the Gulf and London with a handbook to the "countries previously known as the Hejaz, Nejd, and Asir, and now included, with some outlying districts of the peninsula, in Ibn Saud's dominion" (p. 2). With only a few hundred copies printed, the circulation was strictly limited to authorized personnel within British government departments and agencies. All authorized holders of a copy of the Field Notes needed to register separately and were "warned that unauthorized retention or destruction of this document is an offence against the Official Secrets acts" (title-page). Our copy is stamped No. 586 and was handed out at the residence of the British political agent for the Persian Gulf, with an autograph note by the recipient to the inner front board: "Received at Bushire under C.G.S. Receipt form No. 40278/M.0.3. Bks. dated 21/6/37". - This is the first successful attempt to provide a detailed mapping of the region: apart from the vast general map we find large separate maps of air and sea routes, the tribal areas, administrative divisions, charts showing communication lines, the physical geography, magnetic variations, principal watering posts, frontier posts and garrisons together with plans and even panoramic views of the major cities and settlements including Jedda, Mecca, Medina, and Riyadh. Indeed, the volume contains a sheer mass of factual information which no serious researcher can afford to be without. A historical brief of the last two decades of battles, conquests and treaties is followed by detailed reports on the government system and the population of the Peninsula, including descriptions of the various races and their differing attitudes towards Europeans, their tribal element, education, diet, and religion (notably, the editor is highly sympathetic towards Wahhabism, defending it against being viewed as a sect and stating that, "properly speaking, [it] represents the purity" of Islam, as revealed by the Prophet). Physical and political geography are discussed in detail, as are climate and meteorology, flora and fauna. The last chapter is entirely devoted to the armed forces of the Kingdom, with numerous statistical tables and detailed insights into their organization, subsections and ongoing affairs. - Of the utmost rarity: no copy recorded in OCLC (only listing separately three of the maps, all held by Oxford); not traceable at auction or in the trade of the last decades. A perfect copy, well preserved and complete with the five appendices, glossary, route reports 1-4 and all maps and charts as called for. A unique source for the early history and geography of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and its neighbouring sheikhdoms, compiled and secretly distributed before the profound effects of the oil industry began to be apparent. Due to the rarity of the present original the information contained has remained basically inaccessible until now, not even having been made available in reprint form as were most of the early records of the region such as Lorimer, Aitchison and others.
¶ Not in Macro.

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Albuquerque's expedition to the Arabian Gulf
9

Barros, João de. Decada primeira (-terceira) da Asia. Lisbon, Jorge Rodriguez for Antonio Gonsalvez, 1628. Lisbon, Jorge Rodriguez for Antonio Gonsalvez, 1628. Large 4to. 3 vols. (7), 208 ff. (2), 238 ff. (10), 262 ff. Title vignettes (royal arms of Portugal). Without the folding plan present in some copies. Uniform contemporary limp vellum with Iberian handwritten spine titles and traces of ties. All edges red.

EUR 12,500.00

Second edition of the first three "Decades" on Portugal's Middle Eastern enterprises, all that was published during the lifetime of the author (a fourth volume was produced posthumously in 1615, and the set was continued by other hands). "This is considered by Du Fresnoy as being a good edition of the three first decades" (Clarke, The Progress of Maritime Discovery, p. 132). The writer de Barros (1496-1570), head agent for the Portuguese overseas trade authority "Casa da Índia", managed to persuade King João III to commission from him a history of the Portuguese in India (including Asia and southeast Africa). The result, published between 1552 and 1563, earned him renown as one of the first great Portuguese historians, and the the title of a "Portuguese Livy". The 'Decades' contain "the early history of the Portuguese in India and Asia and reveal careful study of Eastern historians and geographers, as well as of the records of his own country. They are distinguished by clearness of exposition and orderly arrangement. They are also lively accounts" (Enc. Britannica). Books 2 and 3 of the "Decada Segunda" (fols. 21 ff.) offer a detailed narrative of Afonso de Albuquerque's expedition to the Arabian Gulf and his conquest of Ormuz in 1507; the island remained under Portuese occupation from 1515 to 1622. As vassals of the Portuguese state, the Kingdom of Ormuz jointly participated in the 1521 invasion of Bahrain that ended Jabrid rule of the Arabian archipelago. - From the library of the Spanish Dukes of Medinaceli y Santisteban (their engraved armorial bookplate on the pastedowns); olf shelfmark on flyleaves. Occasional slight browning, but a very good set.
¶ Palau I.181b. Howgego I, B34, p. 91. Arouca B 56-58. Löwendahl, Sino-Western Cultural Relations I, p. 42, no. 75. OCLC 4507939. Cf. Macro 474.

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The second book printed in Arabic from movable type and a primary source for Columbus’s second voyage to America
10

[Biblia polyglotta - Psalmi]. Psalterium Hebreum, Grecu[m], Arabicu[m], & Chaldaicu[m], cu[m] tribus... latinis i[n]terp[re]tat[ion]ibus & glossis. Genoa, Pietro Paulo Porro, 1516. Genoa, Pietro Paulo Porro, 1516. Folio (binding 250 x 335 mm, inner book 236 x 327 mm). 200 leaves, complete. Title printed in red and black within woodcut arabesque border, printer's device on final leaf. With parallel text in Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Arabic and Chaldaean (in their respective types), 4 columns to a page, 41 lines. 13 woodcut floriated initials (5 Latin, 4 Hebrew, 2 Greek and 2 Arabic). Rebound in near contemporary brown calf, carefully restored, edges and corners repaired, spine fully rebacked in seven compartments with modern gilt title and date.

EUR 48,000.00

First edition. - The first polyglot edition of any part of the Bible, and also the first polyglot work ever published. It is of the utmost importance in several further respects, constituting the second book printed in Arabic from movable type (following Gregorio de Gregorii's "Kitab salat as-sawa'i", a Horologion for the Lebanese Melchites, printed in 1514), as well as the earliest Arabic printing of any portion of the Bible. It also contains the first edition of the Aramaic text of the Psalter and offers for the first time Kabbalistic texts from the Zohar. Furthermore, Giustiniani’s commentary provides the first substantial biographical reference to Columbus, and is thus noted as an Americanum. - The learned Dominican Agostino Giustiniani (1470-1536) was Bishop of Nebbio in Corsica from 1514 and later became the first Professor of Arabic and Hebrew at Paris. On his death he bequeathed his extensive library to the state of Genoa. He edited, supervised and financed the present edition and also wrote the commentary. - His book is the first multilingual edition of any part of the Bible. Aldus Manutius had planned a Psalter in three languages as early as the late 15th century, but his project was not realised. Printed in eight parallel columns on double pages, Giustiniani’s work comprises the text in Hebrew, a literal Latin translation thereof, the Latin Vulgate, the Greek Septuagint, Arabic, Aramaic (Chaldee), a literal Latin translation from the Aramaic, and scholia in the same languages. While Giustiniani aimed to edit the entire Bibel in this form, no further sections were published. He described his difficulties in selling the edition in his History of Genoa (1537), recording an edition size of 2,000 paper copies and 50 copies on vellum. - Giustiniani’s extensive commentary includes a long note to Ps. 19:4 ("et in fines orbis omnia verba eorum"; C7r-D1r), about the Genoese Christopher Columbus, who had died in 1506, containing previously unpublished information on his second voyage: "In this interesting sketch of the life and voyages of his fellow-townsman, Bishop Giustiniani gives an interesting account of the discovery of the new world, and states some facts not mentioned elsewhere" (Sabin). - This edition is also the only book printed at Genoa in the 16th century. The Milanese printer Pietro Paulo Porro maintained a press at Turin with his brother Galeazzo. Giustiniani summoned Porro to Genoa especially for the production of this edition, and had set up a press in the house of his brother Nicolo Giustiniani Paulo. The types were designed and cut for this edition under Porro’s direction. - Mild browning throughout, with some occasional waterstaining (more pronounced near beginning).
¶ Adams B 1370. Darlow/Moule 1411, 1634 & 2401. Smitskamp, PO, 236. Alden-Landis 516/4. Harrisse, BAV no. 88 (pp. 154-158). Sabin 66468. Sander 5957. G. Roper, Early Arabic Printing in Europe, in: Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution. A Cross-Cultural Encounter (Westhofen 2002), pp. 129-150, at p. 132, with colour ill. IV. StCB 25. Vinograd Genoa 1.

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British trade with the "Pirate Coast"
11

[British Trade with the Trucial Cost]. Trade with the Muscat region. - Board of... Trade. - Commercial Intelligence Committee. - Report on the condition and prospects of British trade in Oman, Bahrein, and Arab ports in the Persian Gulf. By H. W. Maclean, Special Commissioner of the Commercial Intelligence Committee of the Board of Trade. Presented to Parliament by command of His Majesty. [Cd. 2281]. London, printed for His Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1904. London, printed for His Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1904. Folio. 10 pp. Loosely sewn as issued.

EUR 6,500.00

Contains reports on the condition and prospects of British trade in Oman, Bahrain, Kuwait and the "Pirate Coast" - specifically, the ports of Sharjah, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi, now parts of the United Arab Emirates. The information covers climate, import and export statistics (including pearls and horses), coinage, weights, freight, and the course of trade. With a final chapter on "questions affecting the [...] Gulf regions generally", expanding on problems of the growing international trade in the region and ways to solve existing impediments to the same. - Title and final page of text dust-soiled; slight edge defects; a few old cataloguing reference numbers in the top right-hand corner of the title. Internally clean copy of a scarce publication.
¶ Macro 1505. Wilson p. 133.

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The Burmah Oil Company in early photographs
12

Burmah Oil Co. Photograph album. Burma, ca. 1904. Burma, ca. 1904. Oblong folio (420 x 312 mm). Contemporary half leather album of 56 large format photographs, ca. 27 x 20 cm.

EUR 9,500.00

A photograph album containing views of Burma, including images of the staff and works of the Burmah Oil Company, the majority uncaptioned, though several are captioned in the negative and a couple are identified by hand. The Burmah Oil Company was formed in Scotland in 1886 and by the early 20th century owned the largest oil fields in the British Empire, producing 90% of Burma's oil output. - The first eight images show group portraits of staff, the following 48 are topographical or portrait photographs, including views of oil fields, Rangoon, the countryside, an oil blaze and elephants at work. - Album slightly worn; 5 additional large format and 2 small photos (group portraits, a brass band, oil fields enveloped in smoke) loosely inserted. Overall in good condition.

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Signed by Napoleon in Egypt
13

[Cairo printing]. Napoleon, Emperor of the French (1769-1821). Document signed ("Bonaparte"). Cairo, Quartier-Général, 1er Pluviôse an 7 (20 January 1799). Cairo, Quartier-Général, 1er Pluviôse an 7 (20 January 1799). Folio. ½ p.

EUR 15,000.00

As general-in-chief of the Egyptian campaign, to the army's chief purser Hector Daure (1774-1846), requesting him to send the necessary cloth for the trousers of the 14th Dragoons with a list of the regiment's active debts: "Je vous prie, Citoyen ordonnateur, de faire délivrer dans 24 heures le drap nécessaire pour les pantalons du 14ère Régt. de Dragons et de me faire remettre l'Etat de tout ce qui est encore dû à les Cavalerie." Written on Napoleon's personal folio stationery ("Bonaparte, Général en chef") with the letterhead "République Française", "Liberté - Égalité", printed by the Imprimerie Orientale, which had introduced the modern printing press to the Arab world only a few months earlier, in October 1798: "The expedition of Napoleon Bonaparte to Egypt from 1798 until 1801 was a prelude to modernity. It was to change permanently the traditional Arab world [...] The French brought Arabic typography to Egypt, where it was practised under the supervision [...] of Jean Joseph Marcel [...]. Only a few days after the French troops landed [...] they set up the Imprimerie Orientale et Française there. It was an extraordinarily important turning point. For, leaving aside the Hebrew printing presses in Egypt of the 16th to the 18th centuries, until this date announcements and news adressed to Arabs there, as well as in other parts of the Arab-Islamic world, had been spread only in hand-writing or orally, by criers, preachers or storytellers" (D. Glass/G. Roper, The Printing of Arabic Books in the Arab World, in: Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution [Gutenberg Museum Mainz 2002], p. 177-225, at 182). - Traces of old folds; some foxing.
¶ Not published in Correspondance de Napoléon I, vol. 5.

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Dedication copy, printed in Arabic throughout
14

Calligaris, Louis. Kitab sirat Napoleon al-Awwal. Histoire de l'Empereur Napoleon... Ier. Paris, (typographie Arbieu), 1856. Paris, (typographie Arbieu), 1856. Large 8vo. (4), 7, (1), (12), 584 pp. With 12 portraits and 5 engraved plates as well as several maps and plans in the text. Title page in French and Arabic. Green half calf with gilt crowned "N" to spine and lower board, upper board with gilt dedication "Offert a Mr le Comte de Breteuil". Moirée endpapers. All edges gilt.

EUR 7,500.00

First edition, rare. - Historical work on Emperor Napoleon I by Colonel Louis (Luigi) Calligaris (1808-70). Apart from his work as orientalist, Calligaris is remembered for founding the military academy at Tunis and for serving as aide-de-camp to the monarch of Tunisia. In 1861 he was appointed professor of Arab studies at the University of Turin, a position he held until his death. - The 12 portrait plates include Napoléon, Joséphine, Napoléon III, and Louis Philippe; the engravings show the Estates General, the Battle of Arcole, the Battle of the Pyramids, etc. - Occasional brownstaining. Binding slightly rubbed, endpapers torn, otherwise in good condition. A remarkable typographic effort of the Second French Empire, this copy a gift for the diplomat and statesman Achille Le Tonnelier de Breteuil (1781-1864), who had already served Napoleon I in various capacities and was made a member of the Senate in 1852.
¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 58.

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Camel Racing and Horsemanship in Upper Egypt
15

[Camel Race]. Minieh, Février 20, 1914. Photograph album of an... important camel racing and horsemanship event. Minya, Upper Egypt, 1914. Minya, Upper Egypt, 1914. Oblong folio (455 x 365 mm). 28 matte photographs (195 x 280 mm or the reverse), individually mounted on cards, recto only. Contemporary sewn red half morocco gilt, flat spine, upper cover titled in gilt and with the photographer's name in gilt. Marbled endpapers.

EUR 45,000.00

Fine album of 28 black/white mounted photographs showing officials and dignitaries, horse and camel trainers, riders, and races at an unknown celebration or festival during the last days of the Khedivate and Ottoman rule in Egypt. A similar album, comprising merely 24 photographs, is kept at the UC Santa Barbara, Special Research Collections (Bernath Mss 185). - Several mounts loosened or detached. Binding worn at extremeties, some waterstaining to covers.

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The first Latin edition of Balbi's account of the Gulf coast
16

De Bry, Johann Theodor. Petits Voyages. Pars I-XII. [Including:] Gasparo Balbi. Navigationis... ex Alepo ad regnum Pegui usque, novem continuis annis [...] absolutae descriptio. Frankfurt, Erasmus Kempffer, 1601-1628. Frankfurt, Erasmus Kempffer, 1601-1628. Folio (220 x 317 mm). 12 books bound in 4 volumes. With 10 engr. title pages, 252 engraved illustrations, 3 engr. views, 17 engr. maps, and 3 armorial engravings. Bound at the end are 5 extra maps and views (including a world map and a view of Jerusalem) from Marino Sanuto's 1611 "Liber secretorum fidelium crucis". Slightly later Spanish limp vellum with ms. title to spine. Ties.

EUR 150,000.00

All twelve books of Théodore de Bry's "Petits Voyages", the greatest single collection of material on early voyages to the East Indies and considered unique in its extraordinary wealth of cartographical and visual material on Africa, India, and South Asia. Notably, book seven includes Gasparo Balbi's groundbreaking account of the Middle East, first published in 1590 as "Viaggio dell' Indie Orientali" - a mere 16 years before this present issue, making this the second appearance in print altogether and the first Latin translation. Balbi, a Venetian jewel merchant, travelled extensively in the Arabian Peninsula in search of precious stones. From Venice he sailed for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir and from there overland to Baghdad, descending the Tigris to Basra, where he embarked for India. While in the Persian Gulf, he studied the pearl industry, noting that the best pearls were to be found at Bahrain and Julfar. He refers to islands in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (including Sir Bani Yas and Das) and to several coastal settlements that were to become permanently established, such as Dubai and Ras al Khaima. Balbi was the first to record the place names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Practically "none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (Slot). - A composite set, nine books in their first, the remaining three in their second edition. As several of the travellers were Protestants and their works banned by the Catholic church, this set was censored by the Spanish inquisition of Granada in 1708 (cf. vol. II, verso of title). Condemned authors are identified on the title pages, and various passages considered too crude or suggestive have been struck out or obliterated. In vol. X, a marginal note on p. 27 attempts to refute an account denouncing the cruelty of the Spanish in America. - Last in the library of Jean-Paul Morin, with his bookplate on the first flyleaf. Rather browned throughout, with occasional slight edge defects; two title pages are repaired. Wants a total of 11 plates, as well as the appendix on the Congo in vol. II and the Notice to the Reader in vol. IV. Balbi's section is complete and well preserved, with only two minor censorship marks. The only comparable copy in recent trade history is the Macclesfield set in contemporary gilt calfskin, auctioned off at Sotheby's in 2007 and currently offered by a U.S. dealer consortium for $150,000: that copy, however, is incomplete, wanting the final volumes XI and XII - the latter of which is "so rare that even Church lacked much of the text".
¶ Brunet I, 1334. Church 206, 207, 208, 211, 212, 214, 217, 219, 221-225. Cf. Howgego I, B7. Ibrahim Al Abed, Peter Hellyer. United Arab Emirates: A New Perspective. London 2001. Slot, B. J. The Arabs of the Gulf, 1602-1784. Leidschendam, published with the support of the Cultural Foundation Abu Dhabi, 1993. Geoffrey King. Delmephialmas and Sircorcor: Gasparo Balbi, Dalmâ, Julfâr and a problem of transliteration. In: Arabian archeology and epigraphy 17 (2006) 248-252. United Arab Emirates yearbook 2005 by Ibrahim Al-Abed, Paula Vine, Peter Hellyer. London 2005. The Heritage Library, Qatar, p. 17. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 79.

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The invention of America
17

De Bry, Theodor. [The Great American Voyages]. Vols. 1-9 plus variant... duplicate volumes of IV and VIII, in all 11 volumes, bound in 9. Mixed editions/issues, mixed German and Latin text. Frankfurt/Oppenheim, 1591-1625. Frankfurt/Oppenheim, 1591-1625. Folio. Bound in 9 uniform magnificent late 19th century full green morocco bindings with gilt centrepieces, gilt lines to edges of boards and gilt line-frames to inside of boards. All edges gilt and all volumes signed W. Pratt.

EUR 185,000.00

A lovely set, exquisitely and uniformly bound, magnificently restored in the most gentle and respectful of manners, of the entire original run of De Bry's "Great American Voyages" (supplied by extra variant copies of volumes IV and VIII), the magnificent work that is responsible for shaping the European image of the New World, inventing it in the minds of the masses. Presenting a broad view of European conquests in America and the first contact with the American Indians, De Bry's Great American Voyages represents the first attempt to introduce in Europe - and on a large scale - a pictorial image of the New World as a whole. With it, the first iconography of the American Indian had been created, and most Europeans glimpsed for the first time the wonders of the New World in the illustrations present here. For more than a century, the European view of the New World was dominated by the present work. Theodor de Bry himself published the first six parts (in German and Latin simultaneously), and after his death, his widow and his two sons issued the three following parts. "It appears that they intended to stop there" (Sabin III, 20). However, 17 years later, Johann Theodor decided to publish another three volumes (1619-24). These are not present here. The present set is a mix of the German and Latin volumes (which appeared simultaneously), and as always in a mix of editions and issues. Due to the great scarcity as well as the complex bibliographical nature of "The Great American Voyages", no sets of this great work are said to be alike. They are always made up of different languages, editions, and issues, and there is said to be no such thing as a "complete set". Copies of sets are almost always in very poor condition. - With the book plate of John Jay Paul (dated 1913 and 1914) to each volume, and each volume with a tipped-in manuscript note describing issue points and/or the main restoration work (one dated 1919). - Gentle washing, pressing, and a few restorations; some maps neatly mounted, 2 maps supplied in facsimile (being the map in both copies of vol. VIII, which is not always present and thus technically not lacking), and a few leaves supposedly supplied from other copies. Occasional slight cropping. All in all a very handsome and well preserved.

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The world's nations illustrated: one of the greatest publishing ventures ever, the rarest work to be found complete
18

Ferrario, Giulio (ed.). Il costume antico e moderno o storia del... governo, della milizia, della religione, delle arti, scienze ed usanze di tutti i popoli antichi e moderni provata coi monumenti dell' antichita e rappresentata cogli analoghi disegni. Milan, tipografia dell'editore, 1829-1834. Milan, tipografia dell'editore, 1829-1834. Folio (380 x 265 mm). 37 vols. incl. supplements and index. With 7 engr. folding maps, 5 engr. maps, 1619 coloured aquatints (2 double-page-sized), 2 engr. portraits, 2 engr. plates of musical notes, and 4 tables. Late 19th century half calf with giltstamped spine title. Untrimmed.

EUR 280,000.00

Without question the largest pictorial encyclopedia of the world published during the 19th century, and one of the rarest works to be found complete. Printed in a press run of no more than 300 copies, this set is numbered "12" and was inscribed to a friend of the author ("del socio Signor G. Ferrario"); as such, it was printed on superior paper and coloured particularly carefully (according to Brunet, most of the 300 copies produced were issued entirely uncoloured). The purpose of this 37-volume set in large folio format was to provide a complete account of all known parts of the world not only by describing in detail the various peoples' costumes, governments, religion, habits, military, arts and science, but also by showing them in splendid illustrations, all of which are here individually coloured by hand. The engravings include not only many costumes, but also buildings, objects of religious and of everyday use, monuments, historical scenes and much more. The plates are printed on wove paper and bear the publisher's drystamp. In spite of the enormous number of plates, the colouring is meticulous throughout. - Initially planned for no more than 13 volumes (1816-1827) and also published in French, this present Italian edition is the only one that was issued complete with all supplements and the plates in their impressive folio format. - Of the utmost rarity: we could not trace a single complete copy on the market since 1950. Auction records list only the abridged 8vo reprint or single volumes of the present folio edition (Sotheby's, May 28, 2002, lot 426: £8,720 for vol. I, pt. 3 only). Interior shows occasional slight foxing to blank margins. Altogether an excellent, complete set of the luxury edition: uniformly bound, untrimmed and wide-margined.
¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 231. Lipperheide Ad 7. Colas 1051. Hiler 311. Brunet II, 1232f.

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The first world chronicle to include bio-bibliographies of Arab scholars
19

Foresti de Bergamo, Jacobus Philippus. Supplementum chronicarum. (With additions by Barillas Bergomas). Brescia, Boninus de Boninis, 1. XII. 1485. Brescia, Boninus de Boninis, 1. XII. 1485. Small folio (209 x 311 mm). (23), 358, (1) ff. (fols. aa1 & b10 blank). 49 lines and headlines. Tables in 2 columns, quire register at end (T8r) in 4 columns, printed marginalia. Capital spaces. Double rules along inner margins of text and between table columns. Lombardic initials supplied in red, capital strokes and paragraph marks. Contemporary alum-tawed blindstamped pigskin over wooden boards, sewn on four double and 2 single cords, bound in the monastic shop of the Würzburg Benedictines (Kyriss 37 / Schwenke-Schunke II, 317 / EBDB w000063), covers panelled with six vertical triple fillets including outer borders and four horizontal triple fillets, decorated with several stamps from that shop (cf. below). Trace of a parchment title label on upper cover, nail holes and discoloration from 10 now-lost metal corner- and centrepieces, pair of chased brass and leather fore-edge clasps. Later shelfmark no. 126 in red ink on plain spine, small 20th c. paper label; 15th c. manuscript waste quire liners.

EUR 65,000.00

Second edition of a popular world chronicle by an Augustinian cleric, a fine copy in a monastic binding. In his chronicle Foresti proposed to bring together the most important historical facts from each year, starting with Genesis. Although he often placed legend and myth on the same plane as documented history, Foresti's chronicle was the first world history to include short bio-bibliographies of Arab scholars. These were not taken over from any of the principal sources cited by the author (Vincent of Beauvais, Boccaccio, Platina, and St Anthony of Florence), attesting to the breadth of his scholarship (cf. Hasse, Success and Suppression: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy in the Renaissance [2016], p. 32). Six editions of Foresti's chronicle are recorded from 1483 to 1491, the last an Italian translation, all but the present edition printed in Venice. The author continued to revise and expand on the work: for the 1503 edition he would add an extra book bringing the account up to the present. - Bonino de Boninis de Ragusia, a Dalmatian cleric, had worked in Venice in 1479 before setting up a press in Verona (with Venetian types), then moving to Brescia. His productions were "dominated throughout by Venetian models and methods" (Scholderer, BMC). Beautifully printed, this edition contains numerous aids to the reader, presumably at least in part as instructed by the author. Two tables in quire aa comprise an alphabetical index of passages mentioning famous women (Foresti essentially plagiarized Boccaccio in his own work on the same subject, published in 1497), and an alphabetical index to cities named in the text. A double-rule chronological bar runs along every page, separating two calendars: on either side of the bar is printed, at the head of each annual section, the date since Creation and the Christian year. Finally, the quire register on the last leaf summarizes the contents of each gathering. - This copy was bound in the shop of the Würzburg Benedictine monks; the tools are: EBDB s004169, two birds on a lily; s004166 = Schwenke Schunke 379a, a banderole with the name of the monastery (san stef. mrt); s004167, a large rosette; s004170, a jumping dog (called a lion by Schunke); plus a diamond-shaped plant tool (38 x 27 mm.), not found in these repertories. - Covers rubbed. Top of first blank leaf clipped, sheet a3.7 (a3 signed "a2") on a guard and evidently supplied from another copy, occasional very minor thumb-soiling, foxing to sheet D1.8, minor small marginal dampstains in quire L. Provenance: Würzburg, Benedictines of St. Stephen (contemporary inscription on front pastedown, "Iste liber pertinet ad S. Stephanum In herbipoli"; a few contemporary marginalia, mainly single words in books 2, 9 and 13). Latterly in the collection of the Aschaffenburg scholar and bookseller Bernd Pattloch (1940-2014) with his bookplate.
¶ HC 2806*. Goff J-209. GW M10965. CIBN J-141. Walsh 3401. Bod-inc J-088. BMC VII 969. BSB-Ink I-122. Cf. Dizionario Bibliografico degli Italiani 48:801-803.

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The rarest treatise on falconry
20

Friedrich II. von Hohenstaufen. Reliqua librorum Friderici II. Imperatoris, de arte venandi... cum avibus, cum Manfredi Regis additionibus. Ex membranis vetustis nun primum edita. Albertus Magnus de falconibus, asturibus, & accipitribus. Augsburg, Johannes Praetorius (Hans Schultes), 1596. Augsburg, Johannes Praetorius (Hans Schultes), 1596. 8vo. (16), 414, (2) pp. With magnificent double-page woodcut illustration and woodcut printer's device on title page (repeated on recto of final leaf). 17th century mottled calf, spine gilt.

EUR 25,000.00

First edition, extremely rare. "The first edition of a classic on hawking, held to be the best and most comprehensive treatise, which, with original Italian and Latin manuscripts, has been the study and research by many writers" (Schwerdt). This classic treatise on ornithology and falconry was written by Frederick II (1194-1250), Holy Roman Emperor. Frederick's original manuscript is lost, but his work exists in two book versions, by his two sons Manfredi and Enzo. The most famous copy of this treatise is the manuscript commissioned by Manfredi, between 1258 and 1266, and contains twelve short additions made by himself. The present publication is the editio princeps of that version; the "1560 Venice" and "1578 Basel" editions mentioned by Lallemant, Souhart, etc. are spurious. The woodcut faithfully reproduces one of the miniatures in Manfredi's version (in the Vatican library): an expressive image of the Emperor with two falconers at his side. Also includes the treatise "De Falconibus Asturibus, & Accipitribus" (p. 357 ff.) by a German dominican philosopher and theologian Alberto Magno, written in Cologne between 1262 and 1280 and first time printed in Rome in 1478.
¶ VD 16, F 2826. BM-STC 319. Adams F, 982. Ceresoli 243. Harting 308. Pichon 201. Nissen IVB 333. Thiébaud 431. Jeanson 1485. Lindner 643.01. Schwerdt I, 187. Souhart 197. Graesse II, 635. Ebert 7925.

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The Most Important 16th Century Map of the Middle East
21

Gastaldi, Giacomo. Il disegno della seconda parte dell' Asia. Rome, Pietro de' Nobili / Paolo Graziani, 1561 [ca. 1580]. Rome, Pietro de' Nobili / Paolo Graziani, 1561 [ca. 1580]. Engraved map, printed from two copper plates (750 x 483 mm). Framed (96: 70 cm).

EUR 95,000.00

The first modern map of the Arabian peninsula (Al-Ankary), here in the extremely rare second state as produced by Paolo Graziani. Still the most sought-after map of the region Gastaldi's two page wall-map served as a model for all further mapping of the peninsula until the 19th century. Gastaldi is regarded as "the most important 16th century Italian cartographer. His maps are very rare, as they were issued separately to order and were not part of an atlas" (Al-Qasimi, 1st ed., p. 23). Gastaldi used various sources including Portolan charts of the region drawn by the 16th-century Portuguese explorers. Many details, such as the coastline of the Arabian Gulf, certain coastal towns, or the peninsula of Qatar, are mapped and named for the first time. It is the most valuable of the early maps of the region. "Although the shape of the peninsula is distorted by modern standards, the Qatar peninsula and Bahrain are both shown - details that are missing on some maps produced up to almost 300 years later" (Stuart McMinn Catalogue). - The present example is a rare variant edition, bearing the imprint of Pietro de Nobilis, a successor of Lafreri in Rome after 1580. Also, above the scale of miles is a further imprint reading: "In Roma appresso Paulo de Graciam." Tooley located only a single example of this state in the Beans collection (now sold). Stefano Bifolco, in his recent census for his upcoming book on Italian Printed Maps from the 16th Century locates only 2 examples (in the Malta National Library and in the Jerusalem National Library, ex-Laor).
¶ Tibbets 28. Karrow 30/91. Couto/Bacqué-Grammont/Taleghani, Atlas Historique du Golfe Persique (2006), p. 132 no. 29 and p. 152. Tooley, Maps in Italian Atlases of the 16th Century, 54. Sultan Bin Muhammad Al-Qasimi (2nd ed.), p. 26 with 2 figs. Tooley, Dictionary II, 143. Cf. Al-Ankary 133 (for the small map only).

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Classified
22

[Glubb, John Bagot]. Handbook of the Nomad, Semi-Nomad, Semi-Sedentary and Sedentary... Tribes of Syria. G.S.I. (T). Headquarters, Ninth army, February 1942. G.S.I. (T). Headquarters, Ninth army, February 1942. 8vo. (4), XV, (1), 186 pp. With large folding map and two folding tables. Bound in modern navy cloth, lacking original wrappers and four preliminary bank leaves but retaining errata slip (on other, reddish paper).

EUR 4,500.00

This document is the property of H.B.M. Government, and is issued for the information of officers and responsible officials. - Very rare. COPAC lists three holdings in the UK, at SOAS, the British Museum and Oxford. OCLC adds five holdings, at the American University in Beirut, Princeton, Duke University, Monash University and Keio University. - Interior very browned throughout, some marginal chipping to final pages and with a typescript insert (updating the information therein). One of the folding tables is split along the fold. 1947 Aleppo ownership and later inscription on flyleaf.

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The Sack of Cyprus: Barberini Dedication Copy
23

Graziani, Antonio Maria. De bello Cyprio libri quinque. Rome, Alessandro Zanetti, 1624. Rome, Alessandro Zanetti, 1624. Small folio (184 x 250 mm). (8), 330, (28) pp. Architectural title page engraved (Cl. Mellan sculps.). With woodcut printer's device on final page and several initials, head- and tailpieces. Contemporary full red morocco, lavishly gilt, with the arms of the Barberini family on an inlaid shield of different-coloured leather on both covers. All edges gilt.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition, dedication copy. - One of the fundamental sources for the Ottoman conquest of Cyprus in 1571, when the Turkish forces invaded the island with 400 ships and some 100,000 men, massacring Nicosia's 20,000 inhabitants. Thus wrested from the Venetians, Cyprus would remain under Ottoman rule until 1878, when it was ceded to Britain as a protectorate; Ottoman sovereignty continued until the outbreak of World War I. - A. M. Graziani (1537-1611) studied the law at Padua before becoming secretary to Pope Sixtus and, in 1592, bishop of Amelia (in Umbria). Pope Clement VIII sent him as his nuncio to the Italian princes and states to unite them in a league against the Ottomans. Graziani having died in 1611, his account was published only posthumously: it was edited by his son Carolo, who dedicated the book to Cardinal Francesco Barberini, nephew of Pope Urban VIII. Barberini was created a cardinal in 1623; in 1627 he became librarian of the Vatican, and in 1632 vice-chancellor. The engraved architectural title (by Claudio Mellan after Antonio Pomeranci) shows History, "magistra vitae", seated atop an elaborate Baroque structure which incorporates Barberini's arms. This is the dedication copy bound for Cardinal Barberini himself: both covers show the crowned bee arms of the Barberini family on dark green leather, enclosed within borders of blind rules and double fillets with corner fleurons and two different bee cornerpieces, all set within a wide floral border and double gilt fillets. Even the spine is richly decorated with bee tools running up and down between a floral railing. - Corners insignificantly bumped, joints barely starting at foot. Some browning and slight waterstaining throughout, also visible on covers, but endpapers replaced with old paper. Later armorial bookplate of the collector John Stafford Reid Byers (1903-84), of Waterfoot House, Newcastle, County Down, to pastedown.
¶ Blackmer 726. Cobham/Jeffery, p. 24. Bruni/Evans, Italian 17th-c. books in Cambridge libraries STC 2547. NUC 211:420. BMC 91:156. Maggs, Cat. 697 (1940-1), no. 114 (this copy). Not in Atabey or Aboussouan. Not in Brunet, Ebert, or Graesse.

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A primary reference work on the history of travel and exploration
24

[Hakluyt Society]. The complete series of the first 200 works... issued by the Hakluyt Society. London, for the Hakluyt Society, 1847-1958. London, for the Hakluyt Society, 1847-1958. 8vo (220 x 150 mm). 210 volumes in 212, comprising a complete run of the first series (vols. 1-100) and second series, part 1 (vols. 1-110). Illustrated. Original green and blue cloth, spines gilt, with gilt stamped motif of the ship "Victoria" on the upper covers.

EUR 85,000.00

A primary reference work on the history of travel and exploration, including the principal accounts of the great voyages to the Middle East. This is a complete run of the first series and a large part of the second series (with its first part complete), dating from 1847 to 1956, of the publications of the Hakluyt Society. Early volumes of interest to the student of the exploration of the Muslim world, but also of the world's exploration by Muslims, include the travels of Abd-er-Razzak (India in the 15th Century, vol. 22, 1857), the travels of Ludovico de Varthema in Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Arabia Felix (vol. 32, 1863), and the History of the Imâms and Seyyids of 'Omân by Salîl-ibn-Razîk (vol. 44, 1871, providing the first indigenous account of the history of Oman in English), as well as the travels to Tana and Persia, by Josafa Barbaro and Ambrogio Contarini (with a Narrative of Italian Travels in Persia in the 15th and 16th Centuries, vols. 49a and 49b, 1873). The "Commentarios" of Afonso de Albuquerque, the first European to enter the Arabian Gulf, are present in a careful edition from 1875ff. (vols. 53, 55, 62, and 69), while the early 15th century narrative of the "Bondage and Travels of Johann Schiltberger, a Native of Bavaria, in Europe, Asia, and Africa" is the first account by a western Christian to state the true burial place of Muhammad, at Medina. Volumes 72 and 73 (1886) contain accounts of early voyages and travels to Persia, while vols. 84 and 85 (1892) offer the famous "Travels of Pietro della Valle in India". Volume 87 (1893) is a collection of "Early Voyages and Travels in the Levant"; vols. 92 and 93 (1896) constitute the famous description of Africa by Al-Hassan Ibn-Mohammed Al-Wezaz Al-Fasi, also known as Leo Africanus. In the second series, vol. 9 (1901) gives the "Travels of Pedro Teixeira, with his 'Kings of Harmuz', and Extracts from his 'Kings of Persia'"; vol. 16 (1905) is the journal of John Jourdain, 1608-17, describing his experiences in Arabia; John Fryer's "New Account of East India and Persia" (covering his travels made in 1672-81) is given in vols. 19, 20 and 39 (1909-15). Ibn Batuta's great travels are contained in vol. 41 (1916) and 110 (1956), while the itinerary of Duarte Barbosa, a Portuguese official in India from 1500 to 1516 (vols. 44 & 49, 1918-21), includes accounts of Mecca and Medina, the ports of Jeddah and Aden, the Arab kingdom of Hormuz, and the islands in the Arabian Gulf (with reference to pearl-diving). The 1496 pilgrimage of Arnold von Harff to Syria, Egypt, Arabia, Palestine, and Turkey is given in vol. 94 (1946), while the following volume recounts the travels of the Abbé Carré in Syria, Iraq and the Gulf region, 1672 to 1674 (1947). - Founded in London in 1846, the aim of the still-thriving Hakluyt Society is to "advance knowledge and education by the publication of scholarly editions of primary records of voyages, travels and other geographical material". For 170 years the society has published an annual or bi-annual volume of original accounts of such voyages. Their historically significant texts and translations, often appearing in print for the first time, are fully annotated, well illustrated with maps and plates, and conform to the highest standards of scholarship. As such they often represent the last word on the material they embrace, and are widely valued by historians and geographers throughout the world. Full complete sets of the publication are only held in institutional libraries, and this is the largest run to have appeared in the trade in over 40 years. - Some spines and covers chipped or repaired; library marks on spine. Provenance: The Western Reserve Historical Society Library (bookplates).

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Arabic poetry
25

Hariri, al-Qasim Ibn 'Ali al- / Silvestre de Sacy, Antoine-Isaac (ed.). Kitab al-Maqamat. Les séances de Hariri, publiées en... Arabe, avec un commentaire choisi. Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1822. Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1822. Small folio (214 x 314 mm mm). 19, (1) pp. of French text; 12, 660 pp. of Arabic text, 1 blank f. (separate title pages in French and Arabic). Contemporary brown mottled calf spine over marbled boards, gilt morocco label to spine; spine-ends gilt. All edges red.

EUR 9,500.00

First printing of the famous "Maqamat" ("Assemblies" or "Sessions") of al-Hariri of Basra (1054-1122): a virtuoso display of Arabic poetry, consisting of fifty anecdotes written in stylized prose which used to be memorized by scholars. "Al-Hariri's Maqamat tie in with the tradition of al-Hamadani. Like he, al-Hariri tells us of the experiences of an educated vagrant, Abu Zaid from Sarug. But his aim is not so much to render vividly this creature of his imagination or even his environment, but rather to invest his accounts with every syntactical and lexical finesse imaginable, and it is these, rather than the content of the narrative, that are to captivate and preoccupy the reader. This is the final flaring of the national Arab spirit: dazzling and, for the moment, pretty as fireworks, but similarly barren, ultimately fizzling out without effect" (Brockelmann). Hariri's masterpiece had continued to captivate European Arabists since the 17th century (cf. Fück, 148): the first part only was published in Arabic and Latin by Fabricius in 1638, followed by Golius in 1656. Schultens published the first three chapters in Arabic and Latin in 1731, with parts 4 through 6 following in 1740. Caussin de Perceval published the full Arabic text in 1819 (following an 1809-14 Calcutta edition), but it was de Sacy’s edition that made the text well-known among orientalists: "[...] it was de Sacy's commentary and edition of the Maqamat of 1822, that was the major work of his scholarly career. De Sacy's edition of al-Hariri was epoch-making in the sense that it began with only a 19-page introduction in French and then the rest of the 600 pages in Arabic" (Jauss/Bahti/DeMan, Toward an Aesthetic of Reception, Minneapolis 1982). Rückert produced a German version in 1826 which was commended by de Sacy. - A fresh, clean copy, appealingly bound, with handwritten ownership "Alfes" on endpapers.
¶ GAL I, 276. Brunet III, 44. Graesse III, 211.

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First substantial English translation of Ibn Batuta's travels through the Islamic world and beyond
26

Ibn Batuta & Samuel Lee (editor). The Travels of Ibn Batuta. Translated from the... abridged Arabic manuscript copies, preserved in the public library of Cambridge. With notes, illustrative of the history, geography, botany, antiquities, &c. occurring throughout the work. (Including:) Report of the proceedings of the first general meeting of the subscribers to the Oriental translation fund, with the prospectus, report of the committee and regulations. London, printed for the Oriental Translation Committee (colophon: by J. L. Cox) and sold by J. Murray, Parbury, Allen & Co. and Howel & Stewart, 1829. London, printed for the Oriental Translation Committee (colophon: by J. L. Cox) and sold by J. Murray, Parbury, Allen & Co. and Howel & Stewart, 1829. Large 4to (32 x 26). "XVIII" [= XX], (2), 243, (1) pp. With various passages including the original Arabic text. Also with a subscription leaf for the Marquss of Landsdowne ("this copy was printed for the most noble the Marquess of Landsdowne"), printed in black and blue, with wood-engraved illustration, in a cast floral border printed in red. Later half calf.

EUR 17,500.00

First edition of the first substantial English translation of the travel account of Abu Abdullah Mohammed ibn Batuta (1304-68/69), known in the West as the Arabian Marco Polo, with extensive footnotes. "While on a pilgrimage to Mecca he made a decision to extend his travels throughout the whole of the Islamic world. Possibly the most remarkable of the Arab travellers, he is estimated to have covered 75,000 miles in forty years" (Howgego). His journeys included trips to North Africa, the Horn of Africa, West Africa and Eastern Europe in the West, and to the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, Southeast Asia and China. - The account known as the Rihla, is esteemed for its lively descriptions of his travels, giving notable information on the history, geography and botany of the countries and cities Ibn Batuta visited. He describes, for example, the city of Aden as follows: "From this place I went to the city of Aden, which is situated on the sea-shore. This is a large city, but without either seed, water, or tree. They have, however, reservoirs, in which they collect the rain-water for drinking. Some rich merchants reside here: and vessels from India occasionally arrive here. The inhabitants are modest and religious" (p. 55). - Endpapers, half-title and subscription leaf foxed, some spots on the title-page, otherwise a very good copy, only slightly trimmed leaving generous margins. Binding very good as well.
¶ Howgego, to 1800, B47.

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Early illustrated edition of the greatest work of Islamic medicine
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Avicenna (Ibn Sina). Liber canonis. De medicinis cordialibus. Cantica. De removendis... nocumentis in regimine sanitatis. De syrupo acetoso. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1562. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1562. Folio (260 x 370 mm). 2 vols. (6), 590 (but: 592), 20, 76 ff. With woodcut device on title, colophon and index, a nearly full-page woodcut diagram of the ocular anatomy (fol. 406v), two full-page woodcuts with a total of six illustrations showing the practice of osteopathy (fols. 480f.), and 5 small woodcuts of plants and anatomical instruments in the glossary of Andreas Bellunensis. Modern vellum bindings preserving much of the old material for covers, entirely rebacked, on 3 raised bands.

EUR 45,000.00

Rare, early illustrated edition of "the most famous medical text ever written" (Garrison/M. 43). Giunta's was the first edition ever to contain illustrations (six meticulous woodcuts of a physician performing chiropractic treatments, as well as a diagram of the human eye anatomy). Includes Giulio Palamede's general index added in 1557 with a separate title page. - Ibn Sina's "Keta-b al-qanun fi'l-tebb" ("Canon of Medicine"), written in Arabic but widely translated throughout the Middle Ages and the basis of medical training in the West as late as the mid-17th century. Finished in 1025, the Qanun is divided into 5 books, devoted to the basic principles of medicine, the Materia Medica (listing about 800 drugs), pathology, diseases affecting the body as a whole and finally the formulary. - Ibn Sina (c. 980-1037), in the West known by his Latinized name Avicenna, was physician to the ruling caliphs. The influence of his Qanun can hardly be overestimated. Translated into Latin in the 12th century, it became a standard textbook of Galenic medicine, influencing many generations of physicians. "From the early fourteenth to the mid-sixteenth century Avicenna held a high place in Western European medical studies, ranking together with Hippocrates and Galen as an acknowledged authority" (Weisser). "[T]he final codification of all Greco-Arabic medicine. It dominated the medical schools of Europe and Asia for five centuries" (Garrison/M. 43). - Occasional worming and dampstaining throughout, light soiling to a few leaves. Handwritten ownership, dated 1660, on title page (Frater Ferdinandus de Regaddini, gift of the physician Giovanni Battista de Sardi of Cremona); a few annotations by the same hand. Stamps of the Biblioteca degli Israeliti di Mantova.
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 3550. Durling 387f. M. H. Fikri, Heritage Library, Scientific Treasures, p. 57, no. 23. This edition not in Adams or BM-STC Italian. Cf. Norman 1590; PMM 11.

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A manual on horses, illustrated with 21 large miniatures
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[Indian Care of Horses]. Shalihotra Samhita. North-west India, 19th century. 4to (230 x 180 mm). Illustrated manuscript on paper in Hindi. 110, (4) pp., ruled in black and red. With 21 painted miniatures, partly heightened in gold and silver. Bound in modern Indian cloth.

EUR 15,000.00

A strikingly illustrated 19th c. manuscript excerpt of the "Shalihotra," a classic of Ayurvedic hippiatry attributed to the legendary founder of Indian veterinary science. Horses were a vital part of Indian culture, and a tradition of hippiatry developed in parallel to human medicine: the sage Shalihotra was said to have been educated alongside Agnivesha - one of the earliest authors on Ayurvedic medicine. Shalihotra's treatise on the care and breeding of horses was translated into many languages and edited into many recensions. This manuscript contains 21 detailed illustrations of horses in various states of distress, with one - depicting a horse being led by a male figure - heightened in gold. It is written in at least four hands and may represent a "core" recension of the text with additional medical knowledge added over time. Several later manuscript annotations in blue ink and pencil record herbal recipes for analgesics and other cures, while the upper corner on one leaf bears a talismanic square made up of an Arabic prayer. - Some leaves bound upside down; light dampstain affecting first 30 leaves, marginal paper repairs affecting text on 14 leaves, but still overall a very appealing manuscript. - From the library of Jay Snider, with his bookplate loosely inserted.

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The bulk of the inhabitants of Dubai territory belong to the tribe of Al Bu Falasah, a branch of the Bani Yas
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[Iraq Petroleum Company]. Handbook of the territories which form the theatre... of operations of the Iraq Petroleum Company Limited and its associated companies. London, Iraq Petroleum Company, 1948. London, Iraq Petroleum Company, 1948. 8vo. VIII, 152 pp. With a frontispiece (portrait of King Faisal I of Iraq), 27 plates, and 1 folding map. Publisher's original cloth.

EUR 3,500.00

First edition, second issue (reprinted February, 1949) of this overview of the Middle Eastern regions emerging as the great oil exporting countries of the century: Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Bahrain, the then Trucial Coast (now the UAE) and Qatar, including the "Hinterland Tribes", Oman, and Kuwait, as well as Iraq and the Levant. Providing details of the companies, the local geography, climate, culture, and political history, this forms an invaluable compendium on the region and ruling personalities as they presented themselves in the immediate postwar years: "The Trucial Rulers acknowledge the paramount position of H.M.G., represented by the Political Resident, but no restrictions are placed upon their independence provided that they adhere to the various Conventions which they have signed [...] Each of the Rulers [...] is thus in direct treaty relations with the British Government [...] A representative of the Political Resident is now stationed at Sharjah. Up to the middle of the nineteenth century the Jawasim power, with its headquarters at Sharjah and Ras al Khaimah, was paramount along the coast, with the Sharjah Shaijh as the principal ruler. This is no longer the case; the seven States recognised by H.M.G. as independent are now equal in status. The Peninsula of Qatar is historically distinct from the Trucial Coast but its Shaikh, early in the present century, entered into agreements with H.M.G. similar to theose of the Trucial rulers [...]. The Shaikhdom of Qatar covers the Peninsula of that name [...] Dohah is the Shaikh's capital and the only considerable village. The north-western end of the peninsula is claimed by the Al Khalifah as the homeland of the present Bahrain dynasty, and bad relations arising from this have frequently brought the two Shaikhs to the verge of war. Otherwise, the Qatar people have few outside contacts. The present ruler, Shaikh 'Abdullah bin Jasim al Thani, is very old and was much influenced by his son and heir Hamad, who died in 1948 [...] The Shaikhdom of Abu Dhabi is in size of territory by far the largest of the Trucial Coast [...] The ruler, Shaikh Shakhbut bin Sultan of the Al Bu Falah, is a quiet, nervous personality. He has three brothers, Hazza', Khalid and Za'id, of whom the last named is probably the outstanding and most influential person in the whole of Trucial Oman [...] The village of Abu Dhabi is situated on a barren island off the coast and is not visited by steamers [...] The bulk of the inhabitants of Dubai territory belong to the tribe of Al Bu Falasah, a branch of the Bani Yas. The Shaikh's authority of largely confined to the coast. Dubai creek has been used as a landing-place for flying boats [...]". Profusely illustrated, including "Early Days in Qatar", aerial photographs of Qatar as well as of Manamah in Bahrain, "Pearl Divers Opening Their Shells", etc. - The Iraq Petroleum Company (IPC) had virtual monopoly on all oil exploration and production in Iraq from 1925 to 1961. It was involved in other parts of the Middle East, and played a major role in the discovery and development of oil resources in the region. IPC operations were taken over by the Iraq National Oil Company after they were nationalised by the Ba'athist government in June 1972. - A good copy.
¶ OCLC 5464854. Not in Macro.

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The Army surgeon of Napoleon's campaign
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Larrey, [Dominique-Jean]. Relation historique et chirurgicale de l'expédition de l'armée... d'orient, en Egypte et en Syrie. Paris, Demonville & Soeurs, an XI - 1803. Paris, Demonville & Soeurs, an XI - 1803. 10, (2), 480 pp. Contemporary full calf with gilt cover borders and gilt spine (rebacked) with green labels; gilt inner dentelle and leading edges; marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.

EUR 4,500.00

First edition. - Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842), the "most famous army surgeon of the modern age" (Hirsch), introduced the revolutionary "ambulances volantes" ("flying field hospitals"), mobile medical units that attended to casualties as part of the immediate avant-garde. In 1798 he was assigned to Napoleon's Egyptian expedition in the rank of chief medical officer. His present volume offers both an account of the military operations and the medical aspects of the campaign, documenting the wealth of his experience gained in the Middle Eastern theatre. He would expand on the present account in the monumental state-published "Description de l'Égypte" (1809). - In a beautiful, contemporary French binding signed by Courteval (active from 1796 to 1836) on the marbled flyleaf (covers somewhat rubbed and chafed; spine and hinges professionally repaired). Old stamps of the Medical Society of Buda and Pest (Societas Medicorum Pestiensis et Budensis); old ownership "Hessel" to half-title.
¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 358. Waller 5612. Wellcome III, 451. Hirsch III, 613. OCLC 422338032.

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