The first rational, complete and illustrated treatise on surgery and surgical instruments
1

Albucasis (Abulcasis, Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi) / Argellata, Pietro. Chirurgia Argelate cum Albucasi. [...] Petri de Largelata... [...] chirurgie libri sex, novissime post omnes impressiones ubique terrarum excussas, [...] erroribus expurgati. Adiuncta etiam chirurgia doctissimi Albucasis cum cauteriis et instrumentis suis figuraliter appositis, que in aliis hactenus impressis minime reperies. (Venice, Giunta, 1 March 1520). (Venice, Giunta, 1 March 1520). Folio (225 x 315 mm). 159 (misnumbered: 155), (1) pp., final blank. With numerous initials and woodcuts in the text; colophon and printer's device printed in red. 19th-century half calf with giltstamped green spine label.

EUR 45,000.00

Early, very rare edition of the surgical section of Albucasis's "Al-Tasrif", the "first rational, complete and illustrated treatise on surgery and surgical instruments. During the Middle Ages it was the leading textbook on surgery until superseded by Saliceto" (Garrison/M.). Includes nearly 200 woodcut illustrations of surgical instruments, including a forceps for extracting a dead fetus - a device of his own invention, still in use in modified form. - Abu al-Qasim, hailed as the "father of modern surgery", specialized in curing disease by cauterization. He designed several devices used during surgery, for purposes such as inspection of the interior of the urethra, applying and removing foreign bodies from the throat, inspection of the ear, etc. In his "Al-Tasrif" he described how to ligature blood vessels almost 600 years before Ambroise Paré. Al-Qasim was also the first to describe a surgical procedure for ligating the temporal artery for migraine, also almost 600 years before Pare recorded that he had ligated his own temporal artery for headache that conforms to current descriptions of migraine. His use of catgut for internal stitching is still practised in modern surgery (catgut apparently being the only natural substance capable of being absorbed by the body). - Occasional browning and waterstaining; insignificant worming to gutter near beginning; numerous contemporary (and a few 18th-c.) ms. notes and marginalia, especially to flyleaf, title page and colophon, and final blank. Provenance: contemp. ownership "Ludovicus Bonnaillus"; later in the library of the French surgeon Jean Vigier (d. 1665; cf. later notes of acquisition); latterly in the collection of the French physician and naturalist Pierre Auguste Broussonnet (1761-1807), sometime French consul in Morocco, with his collection stamp on title page. A fine copy.

Add to shortlist

Poetry attributed to one of Muhammad's first disciples
2

Ali ibn Abi Talib (Gerardus Kuypers, ed.). Carmina. Arabice et Latine. Leiden, Johannes Hasebroek, Bernhardus Jongelijn, 1745. Leiden, Johannes Hasebroek, Bernhardus Jongelijn, 1745. 8vo. [8], 195, [36], [1 blank] pp. With a woodcut rococo ornament on the title-page, 3 woodcut rococo headpieces and tailpieces (1 repeating the title-page ornament), headpieces, tailpieces and factotums built up from cast arabesque fleurons. Set in roman, italic and Arabic with incidental Greek, Hebrew and Syriac. Modern half calf, blind rolls and gold fillets with a red morocco spine label, marbled sides, with the red bookbinder's ticket of Period Binders, Bath (established in the 1960s).

EUR 3,950.00

First and only edition of Gerardus Kuypers's annotated Arabic and Latin text of a book of religious poetry traditionally attributed to Ali ibn Abi Talib (ca. 600-661), the first man to convert to Muhammad's new religion of Islam and ruler of the Caliphate from 656 to his death. A 28-page appendix provides an Arabic-Latin glossary. Kuypers (1722-1798) studied theology at Leiden University under the orientalist Albert Schultens and emphasized the importance of Arabic studies in his 1743 thesis. The present scholarly edition of an important book of Islamic poetry was his first publication after his thesis. He became a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. - With a browned water stain at the foot of the last few leaves and some mostly marginal browning in the title-page, otherwise in very good condition. Binding very good. Extensively annotated Arabic and Latin edition of poetry by one of the earliest Islamic leaders.

Add to shortlist

Rare printing from Cairo
3

[Almanach]. Annuaire de la République Française, calculé pour le... méridien du Caire, l'an IX de l'ère française. Cairo, de l'Imprimerie Nationale, an IX [1800/1801]. Cairo, de l'Imprimerie Nationale, an IX [1800/1801]. Small 4to. 68, (2), 48 pp. Title-page printed in red. Contemp. half calf with gilt spine.

EUR 15,000.00

Rare Cairo imprint. Includes navigational tables, a concordance between the Muslim and the French Republican calendar, and a comparison of French and Egyptian units of measure. Of particular importance is a table of French army in the Orient, showing the members of the administration, of finances, of the Commission of Sciences and Arts, of the Institute, etc. - Only in October 1798 had J. J. Marcel arrived in Cairo with his employees and types to organize the Imprimerie Orientale, thus introducing modern printing to the Arab world. "The expedition of Napoleon Bonaparte to Egypt from 1798 until 1801 was a prelude to modernity. It was to change permanently the traditional Arab world [...] The French brought Arabic typography to Egypt, where it was practised under the supervision [...] of Jean Joseph Marcel [...]. Only a few days after the French troops landed [...] they set up the Imprimerie Orientale et Française there. It was an extraordinarily important turning point. For, leaving aside the Hebrew printing presses in Egypt of the 16th to the 18th centuries, until this date announcements and news adressed to Arabs there, as well as in other parts of the Arab-Islamic world, had been spread only in hand-writing or orally, by criers, preachers or storytellers" (D. Glass and G. Roper, cf. below). - Careful repairs to binding. From the library of the British physician and army surgeon Sir Robert Alexander Chermside (1787-1860) with his bookplate. Rare; only 3 copies in France (Paris, Strasbourg, Lyon).

Add to shortlist

Dutch ship's journal giving detailed accounts of audiences with the Sheik of Bushehr and the deputy of the Sultan of Oman and of Dutch trade at Muscat and Bushehr, including the purchase of 25 Arabian horses
4

[Maritime history of the Arabian Gulf]. Journaal, gehouden aan boord van het schip Baron... van der Capellen gevoerd door Kapn. Peter, op de reize van Batavia naar de Golf van Persie in 1824. [On board ship from Batavia (Jakarta, Indonesia) to Muscat in Oman, Bushehr in Iran and back], 14 March-9 November 1824. [On board ship from Batavia (Jakarta, Indonesia) to Muscat in Oman, Bushehr in Iran and back], 14 March-9 November 1824. Manuscript ship's journal in Dutch, written in black ink on paper. 2 blank ff., (66) pp., 65 blank ff. Contemp. half vellum, sewn on 3 tapes, sprinkled paper sides.

EUR 75,000.00

Anonymous ship's journal from the 1824 voyage of the three-masted merchant frigate "Baron van der Capellen" from Batavia in the East Indies (now Jakarta, Indonesia) to Muscat in Oman and Bushehr on the Iranian coast of the Gulf. It was probably kept by the ship's senior merchant (opperkoopman), for he seems to be in charge of buying, selling and trading. The deputy of Said bin Sultan Al-Said (1790-1856), Sultan of Muscat and Oman, personally invited him to an audience (the Sultan himself was en route to Mecca), and the Sheik of Bushehr met with him and provided him with an (Armenian?) assistant, Arakiel. He also sometimes notes his disputes with the Captain J. H. Peter, and on 23 August records that the Captain is sick and that he therefore received a letter from the "eerste stuurman" (first mate) Smitt. The ship was built in 1815 and active through 1834. - The journal is neatly written, with daily entries throughout the voyage and on land at the destination ports. During the voyage itself these entries briefly mention the favourable or unfavourable winds or weather, notes when they passed or briefly stopped at various named islands, notes ships they encountered, the deaths of sailors or soldiers, etc. Most interesting, however, are his dealings on land of the Arabian peninsula and on the Iranian coast of the Gulf. The ship came in sight of the Arabian coast on 22 May and anchored at Muscat on 26 May. The author devotes nine pages to a detailed account of his reception and his trading there during his first eight days. He describes some of the presents brought for the Sultan: some disappeared, apparently taken by the Imam's wives or servants, but reappeared after the author reported the fact. They anchored at Bushehr on 4 July, where our author gives more details of their trading. He and the Sheikh got on well and shared a dislike for the English there. He acquired a wide variety of goods, including large quantities of cloves, nutmeg, oils, galls (to make dyestuffs?), carpets, cloths and even a pair of elephant tusks. But he especially took an interest in the Arabian horses, finally buying 25 and listing them by number with the prices and giving some other details. At the suggestion of Arakiel, our author urged Captain Peter to remove some planks above the hold to give the horses relief from the heat, but he refused to damage his ship and two horses did indeed die. On 21 July the author notes that the English resident left Bushehr for the city of "Chiras" (Guyum in Shiraz), where he says an earthquake had killed 4000 people. This was the earthquake of 25 June, with an estimated magnitude of 6.4. - The blank book originally contained 102 leaves, collating [A]10 [B-C]12 [D]6 [E]8 [F]10 [G]12 [H]8 [I]12 [K]12. The final leaf K12 appears to have been removed before the blank book was bound, and A1 and K11 served as paste-downs. There are three paper stocks, all Dutch. All written leaves except the last are in quires A-C, watermarked: Royal cipher of King Willem I (a circle containing the crowned W and crossed branches) = Dutch Garden/Pro Patria. Neither Voorn, Noord-Holland nor Heawood records any watermark with the crowned W, but another stock (with a watermark patriotically topped with an Orange tree) closely matches Voorn 172, dated 1823. Although leaf D1 has been removed (directly before the last written leaf D2), there is clearly no gap in the text, with the complete entry for 28 October on C12 followed by the complete entry for 29 October on D2. - The manuscript is in very good condition, with only the occasional minor spot or marginal chip. The binding is somewhat tattered, with 3 of the 4 vellum corners lost and the sewing somewhat loose. A fascinating ship's journal, forming an important and very detailed primary source for Dutch relations and trade in Oman and Iran.

Add to shortlist

Exceptionally large armillary sphere
5

Armillary sphere with celestial globe. Rotating celestial globe, bordered by four pivotable concentric... rings, the uppermost with ornamental mount. Arabic, 1125 AH (1713 CE). Arabic, 1125 AH (1713 CE). Engraved and etched gilt brass with lettering in Arabic. Total height from ring to base 53 cms.

EUR 250,000.00

Exceptionally large armillary sphere with rich calligraphical and ornamental decoration as an image of the universe. The celestial sphere is surrounded in the centre by rings with the signs of the zodiac (outside) and various planet symbols. The names of the zodiac signs and months are engraved in Arabic. Signed and dated by the artist, an "Alexander", in the year H 1125. A nearly identical object is kept at the Globe Museum of the Austrian National Library at Vienna (item GL. 214), there classified as "Persian/Arabic". While simple celestial globes are not uncommon in the trade, elaborate specimens of the present size (53 cms) are very rare. - Slightly soiled and corroded, but hardly rubbed.

Add to shortlist

Elizabethan Horsemanship
6

(Astley, John). The Art of Riding, set foorth in a... breefe Treatise, with a due interpretation out of certeine places alledged out of Xenophon, and Gryson, verie expert and excellent Horssemen: wherein also the true use of the hand by the said Grysons rules and precepts is speciallie touched: and how the Author of this present worke hath put the same in practice, also what profit men may reape thereby [...] Lastlie, is added a short discourse of the Chaine or Cavezzan, the Trench, and the Martingale: written by a Gentleman of great skill and long experience in the said Art. London, Henry Denham, 1584. London, Henry Denham, 1584. 4to. (8), 79, (1) pp. With woodcut headpiece on t. p. and initials. 19th century orange-red crushed morocco by Riviere with leading edges gilt and elaborate gilt inner dentelle, rebacked. All edges gilt.

EUR 28,000.00

The exceedingly rare first edition of one of the earliest English treatises on horsemanship, derived in part from Xenophon, Federico Grisone's "Ordini di cavalcare", and other authors, and in part from Astley's own experience. This is, in fact, the first translation into English of Xenophon's treatise "Peri hippikes" ("On horsemanship"). - The publication of Astley's "Art of Riding", perhaps his single most lasting achievement, came late in his life as an Elizabethan courtier. Here, he relays the doctrine of the Italian riding schools as he and other Gentleman Pensioners understood it, particularly on training the horse to respond to the hand. Astley was on friendly terms with Thomas Blundeville, whose Grisone translation two decades earlier counts as the first treatise on horsemanship to be published in English. - First three leaves slightly browned, with the upper right corner of each leaf imperceptibly restored from another copy; a closed tear to f. A4. Altogether a remarkable clean and crisp copy in an English master binding. The Fitzwilliam-Gloucester copy, bound with a common companion piece, Claudio Corte's "Art of Riding" (also published by Denham in the same year) commanded £14,400 at Christie's in 2006. The catalogue notes that the scarcity of these two work "at auction varies markedly; ABPC records some 5 copies of Corte's work at auction since 1975, but none of Astley's".

Add to shortlist

The first printed record of Abu Dhabi and Dubai
7

Balbi, Gasparo. Aanmerklyke zee en land-reysen [...] naar Oost-Indien, van't... jaar 1579 tot het jaar 1588. Leiden, Pieter van der Aa, 1706. Leiden, Pieter van der Aa, 1706. 8vo. (2), 153, (19) pp. With Van der Aa's engr. device on title-page and 10 double-page engr. plates (wants the folding engr. map). Modern marbled boards.

EUR 1,800.00

First Dutch edition of Balbi's acclaimed "Viaggio dell' Indie Orientali", first published in Italian in 1590. Balbi, a Venetian jewel merchant, travelled extensively in the Arabian Peninsula in search of precious stones. From Venice he sailed for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir and from there overland to Baghdad, descending the Tigris to Basra, where he embarked for India. While in the Persian Gulf, he studied the pearl industry, noting that the best pearls were to be found at Bahrain and Julfar. He refers to islands in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (including Sir Bani Yas and Das) and to several coastal settlements that were to become permanently established, such as Dubai and Ras al Khaima. Balbi was the first to record the place names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Practically "none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (Slot). - Brownstained and slightly wrinkled, with occasional edge defects.

Add to shortlist

Sailing directions for the Gulf
8

Bayo y López, Luis (ed.). Derrotero General del Océano Índico, publicado por la... Dirección de Hidrografía. Tomo segundo. Madrid, Dirección de Hidrografía, 1889. Madrid, Dirección de Hidrografía, 1889. 8vo. XIX, 451, (1) pp. Original blue cloth with giltstamped cover title (spine rebacked).

EUR 2,500.00

Sailing Directions for the Indian Ocean, this volume focusing on the Arabian Gulf and the area of today's United Arab Emirates: "Sharika ó Sharge" (Sharjah), "Dabai" (Dubai), "Abu Thabi" (Abu Dhabi), etc. - Evenly browned throughout; a good copy.

Add to shortlist

60 photographs by Bechard of Egyptians and Nubians
9

Béchard, Henri. Égypte et Nubie. No place or date (but ca. 1880). No place or date (but ca. 1880). 60 photographs on albumen paper, measuring 28 x 22 cm each, signed and captioned in the plate, numbered 1 through 68. Contemp. green half calf with gilt spine and title "Égypte & Nubie", initialef "B.C.D." on first plate.

EUR 45,000.00

Large and beautiful photographs of Bechard: excellent vintage prints, mostly in superior condition. They represent the popular Egyptian and Nubian types, frequently in close-ups. Nissan N. Perez states that this part of the work of a photographer specializing in views of sites and monuments "has escaped general attention" (cf. Focus East, p. 123, reproduceing the photograph of water carriers resting). Includes: a scribe; a sheikh reading the Qur'an, merchants and grocers, a group of ulemas (religious scholars) reading the Qur'an, an Arab drawing water, whirling dervishes, Arab peasants (a fellah carrying water), a sheikh going to the mosque, a game of Mangala, water carriers, mat manufacturers, Sheikh Sadad, a descendant of Mohammed, a falconer, washerwomen, an Arabic singer, a young fellah, a Darabouka player, labourers, a public fountain, a beggar, Arabs at prayer, Arabic coffee, etc. - Béchard was active between 1869 and ca. 1890 "His work is distinguished by the superb quality of his prints and the generally spectacular presentation of even the most common sites, such as the pyramids. His studies of people and costumes are even more interesting and point to a very personal involvement of the photographer in the life and customs of the country. His cityscapes and urban scenes were mostly taken from unusual angles in an attempt to cope with the narrow and confined spaces" (Nissan N. Perez). - Binding repaired in places.

Add to shortlist

on pesche les perles ... dans le Golfe Persique, principalement ... aupres de Baroyn
10

Berquen, Robert de. Les merveilles des Indes orientales ou nouveau traitté... des pierres precieuses & perles, contenant leur vraye nature, dureté, couleurs & vertus: chacune placée selon son ordre & degré, suivant la cognoissance des marchands orfévres. Auquel est adjouté une petite table fort exacte, pour connoitre en un instant à quel tiltre les marchands orphevres de Paris, & les autres dans toutes les principalles villes presque de toute l'Europe, travaillent l'or & l'argent. Paris, C. Lambin, 1661. Paris, C. Lambin, 1661. 4to. (12), 112 pp. With engr. portrait frontispiece of Anne Marie Louise d'Orleans and numerous pretty woodcut initials and tailpieces. Contemp. richly gilt calf, leading edges and spine gilt (tiny defect to upper spine-end and hinge). Marbled pastedowns.

EUR 25,000.00

First edition of this rare work on precious stones and pearls found in the East and West Indies, written by a Parisian "marchand orphèvre". Dedicated to "La Grande Mademoiselle" Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier and niece of Louis XIII, with her finely engraved portrait by L. Boissevin (which, according to Graesse, is frequently lacking). This "very early, and important treatise on gemstones, gold & silver" (Sinkankas) includes a chapter dedicated exclusively to pearls, a subject with which the author was especially familiar (cf. ibid.), and the Persian Gulf is stated as one of the main locations of pearl fishing: "on pesche les perles en divers endroits du monde. Dans le Golfe Persique, principalement aux environs de l'Isle d'Ormus & Bassora: aupres de Baroyn [i.e., Bahrain], Catiffa, Iuffa, Camaron, & autres lieux de ce Golfe [...]" (p. 74). "The first chapter attempts to reconcile differing views of various writers, as cited by Berquen, on the origin of gemstones and precious metals, with following chapters taking up the principal gemstones, and some minor ones, as diamond, sapphire, topaz, ruby, spinel, emerald, amethyst, aquamarine, hyacinth, opal, chrysolite, iris, vermeille, garnets, carnelian, turquoise, quartz varieties, pearl, coral and amber, and lastly, a chapter on gold and silver [...] Both [the first and the second edition] are rare (Sinkankas, p. 97f.). - Insignificant waterstain and occasional slight worming, mainly confined to upper margin. A good copy in an elaborately decorated contemporary French binding.

Add to shortlist

on pesche les perles ... dans le Golfe Persique, principalement ... aupres de Baroyn
11

Berquen, Robert de. Les merveilles des Indes orientales ou nouveau traitté... des pierres precieuses & perles, contenant leur vraye nature, dureté, couleurs & vertus: chacune placée selon son ordre & degré, suivant la cognoissance des marchands orfévres, le tiltre de l'or & de l'argent, avec augmentation à plusieurs chapitres, les raisons contre les chercheurs de la pierre philosophale & souffleurs d'alquemie, et de deux autres chapitres du prix des diamans, & des perles. Paris, C. Lambin, (1668-)1669. Paris, C. Lambin, (1668-)1669. 4to. (8), 152 pp. With engr. portrait frontispiece of Anne Marie Louise d'Orleans and numerous pretty woodcut initials and tailpieces. Contemp. richly gilt calf, gilt dentelle central cover decoration showing the Sacred Heart of Jesus, gilt spine on five raised bands (upper spine-end and corners repaired). Marbled pastedowns.

EUR 28,000.00

Second, enlarged edition of this rare work on precious stones and pearls found in the East and West Indies, written by a Parisian "marchand orphèvre" in Paris and first published in 1661. Both editions are dedicated to "La Grande Mademoiselle" Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier and niece of Louis XIII, with her finely engraved portrait, which is here more delicately executed (by Nicolas de Larmessin, in 1664). The large chapter devoted to pearls and pearl fishing cites the Persian Gulf and several specific places there as among the main locations of pearl fishing: "on pesche les perles en divers endroits du monde. Dans le Golfe Persique, principalement aux environs de l'Isle d'Ormus & Bassora: aupres de Baroyn [i.e., Bahrain], Catiffa, Iuffa, Camaron, & autres lieux de ce Golfe [...]" (p. 68). This chapter is here "augmented with an appendix which recounts the history of the Spanish conquest in the New World and additionally gives remarks on pearl fisheries, natural history, and production [...] New chapters comprise Ch. 17, on the pricing of diamonds according to size and quality, and Ch. 18 on pricing of pearls. In tems of substance, this edition [the second one, here offered] is considerably superior to the first; both are rare" (Sinkankas p. 97f.). It is these new, additional chapters in particular for which this second edition is sought after "Du prix des Diamans" and "Du prix des Perles", as well as one entitled "Raisons contre les chercheurs de la Pierre Philosophale & souffleurs d'Alquemie. Et ne sera pas mal à propos de parler de Nicolas Flamel sur ce sujet". - Lower spine-end and corners somewhat bumped, otherwise fine. A good copy in an appealingly decorated contemporary French binding.

Add to shortlist

Editio princeps of the Gospels in Arabic (Darlow/M.)
12

[Biblia arabica - NT]. Evangelium Sanctum Domini nostri Iesu Christi conscriptum a... quatuor Evangelistis sanctis, idest Matthaeo, Marco, Luca et Iohanne. Rome, typographia Medicea, 1590(-1591). Rome, typographia Medicea, 1590(-1591). Folio. 368 pp. With 149 large woodcuts. Contemporary paper wrappers (edge and spine defects).

EUR 18,000.00

Rare first edition of the Gospels in Arabic; the first work to be issued from the Medicean Press, directed by G. B. Raimondi. Printed in Granjon's famous large fount, generally considered the first satisfactory Arabic printing type and appears here for the first time. Apart from the Latin title and colophon, the book is in Arabic throughout. Also in 1591 an Arabic-Latin edition was issued, more common than the present one and reprinted in 1619 and 1774. Illustrated with 149 large woodcuts from 67 blocks by Leonardo Parasole after Antonio Tempesta. - Some browning and waterstaining throughout; a few marginal tears; binding loosened. Untrimmed in the original temporary wrappers as issued. The Hauck copy fetched $75,000 at Sotheby's in 2006.

Add to shortlist

13

[Breviary in Arabic]. Al-Urulugiyun, ay al-sawa`i al-mustamil `ala salawat al-fard al-qanuniyya.... Dayr al-Shuwayr, Kisrawan, Lebanon, St. John the Baptist Monastery, 1822. Dayr al-Shuwayr, Kisrawan, Lebanon, St. John the Baptist Monastery, 1822. 8vo. (10), 736 pp. Printed in red and black throughout. Contemp. blindstamped black calf binding.

EUR 9,500.00

The Arabic Horologion (following the Byzantine rite), containing the breviary, canonical prayers and hymns for the feast days of the Saints throughout the year. From the printing office of the Melkite monastery of St. John the Baptist at al-Shuwayr in the Lebanese Kisrawan mountains, operative between 1734 and 1899, during which time it produced in all 69 Arabic books, including re-editions (cf. Silvestre de Sacy I, pp. 412-414; Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution. A Cross-Cultural Encounter, Westhofen 2002, pp. 179-181). Occasional insignificant brownstaining; slight chipping to extremeties of the appealing original binding. Rare: OCLC lists two copies only (at the University of Leiden and the Veech Library, Catholic Institute of Sydney, Australia).

Add to shortlist

Madagascar and its opportunities for trade and colonization, detailing the trade with India, Persia and other countries along the Arabian Sea
14

Boothby, Richard. A breife discovery or description of the most... famous island of Madagascar or St. Laurence in Asia neare unto East-India. London, Printed by E[dward] G[riffin] for John Hardesty, 1646. London, Printed by E[dward] G[riffin] for John Hardesty, 1646. Small 4to (20 x 15.5 cm). With the title-page in a border built up from cast fleurons, 2 woodcut headpieces, 3 decorated woodcut initials (1 series) and 3 headpieces built up from cast fleurons. [12], 72, [1], [1 blank] pp. Tanned sheepskin (ca. 1850), gold fillets on boards, spine (with a black morocco label) and board edges, gilt upper edge, dark green endpapers. Rebacked, with original backstrip laid-down.

EUR 35,000.00

First separately published edition of Boothby's description of Madagascar and its opportunities for trade and colonization, detailing the trade with India, Persia (including Ormuz, captured in 1622 by a joint Anglo-Persian force) and other countries along the Arabian Sea and touching on a large variety of subjects including Saint Augustine's harbour, culture of the natives, opportunities for plantations, natural resources, pearl fishery and trading practices of the English, Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch. - The British merchant Richard Boothby, who was initially a member of the Merchant's Adventurers' Company, had reinvested his capital in the East India Company around 1615, after which he sailed to India where he was jailed as a result of a dispute with company officials. Upon his release he returned to London by way of Madagascar, which inspired his enthusiasm so much that he wrote the present book advising the East India Company's rivals to take advantage of it as the ideal location for a European colony. - The text was first published in Thomas Osborne's A collection of voyages and travels (1645) and here separately published for the first time, with an additional 4-page dedication to King Charles. - With letterpress bookplate on pastedown: "from the books of Crosby Gaige" (1882-1949), a Broadway producer, publisher and rare book collector. Several chapters are heavily annotated in the margins and the whole last page, in English in an early hand. These give information about a voyage or voyages and would reward further study. With the gutter margin of the title-page and all margins of the last leaf restored (not touching the printed text and affecting only the corner of one manuscript annotation) but otherwise in good condition, with a small tear in the fore-edge margin of the title-page and a couple minor spots. Rebacked, but binding otherwise good.

Add to shortlist

15

Burckhardt, Johann Ludwig (John Lewis). Travels in Arabia, comprehending an account of those... territories in Hedjaz which the Mohammedans regard as sacred. London, Henry Colburn, 1829. London, Henry Colburn, 1829. Large 4to (26 x 21 cm). XVI, 478 pp. With five lithogr. maps (one folding). 19th century three-quarters green levant with prettily gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.

EUR 6,500.00

First edition (the second of the same year was in two volumes, octavo). Burckhardt travelled disguised as an Arab, making his notes clandestinely. This work deals primarily with his travels to Mecca and Djidda, Medina and Yembo. The Lausanne-born Burckhardt (1784-1817) was a remarkable character, the first Westerner to visit the Holy Cities. In the guise of a pilgrim "he proceeded to perform the rites of pilgrimage at Mekka, go round the Kaaba, sacrifice, &c., and in every respect acquitted himself as a good Muslim. No Christian or European had ever accomplished this feat before; and the penalty of discovery would probably have been death. [...] Burckhardt possessed the highest qualifications of a traveller. Daring and yet prudent, a close and accurate observer, with an intimate knowledge of the people among whom he travelled, their manners and their language, he was able to accomplish feats of exploration which to others would have been impossible" (Stanley Lane-Poole, in: DNB VII, 293f.). - Old stamp of the "Belcher Library" (Gaysville, Vermont) on first blank, some toning and brownstaining. Rare.

Add to shortlist

16

Burton, Sir Richard Francis. Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El-Medinah and... Meccah. London, Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1855-1856. London, Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1855-1856. 3 volumes, 8vo. XVI, 388 pp. (2), IV, 426 pp. XII, 448 pp. Half-title in vol. 3, without publisher's ads. 4 maps & plans (3 folding), 5 colour lithographed plates, 8 tinted lithographed plates. Later half morocco over marbled paper covered boards, bound by Zaehnsdorf, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition of Burton's classic account of his journey across the Arabian peninsula. In the fall of 1852, Burton first proposed to the Royal Geographical Society an expedition to central Arabia with the intent on visiting the holy cities. His request was denied by the RGS and the East India Company as being too dangerous for a westerner, though he was funded to study Arabic in Egypt. Upon arrival there, in April 1853, disguised as a Pashtun and travelling under the pseudonym Mirza Abdullah, Burton made the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina. "The actual pilgrimage began with a journey on camel-back from Cairo to Suez. Then followed twelve days in a pilgrim ship on the Red Sea from Suez to Yambu, the port of El-Medinah. So far the only risk was from detection by his companions. Now came the dangers of the inland road, infested by Bedawin robbers. The journey from Yambu to El-Medinah, thence to Meccah, and finally to the sea again at Jeddah, occupied altogether from 17 July to 23 Sept., including some days spent in rest, and many more in devotional exercises. From Jeddah, Burton returned to Egypt in a British steamer, intending to start afresh for the interior of Arabia via Muwaylah. But this second project was frustrated by ill-health, which kept him in Egypt until his period of furlough was exhausted. The manuscript ... was sent home from India, and seen through the press by a friend in England. It is deservedly the most popular of Burton's books ... as a story of bold adventure, and as lifting a veil from the unknown, its interest will never fade" (DNB). Indeed, the work would be described by T.E. Lawrence as "a most remarkable work of the highest value."

Add to shortlist

First English-language edition of a great epic poem devoted to Portuguese voyages and conquests
17

Camoens, Luis de. The Lusiad, or Portugals Historicall Poem; Written in... the Portingall Language by Luis de Camoens, and now newly put into English by Richard Fanshaw, Esq. London, printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1655. London, printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1655. Folio. (22), 224 pp., plus full-page engraved portraits of Prince Henry the Navigator and Vasco de Gama. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Camoens with verses below. 20th-century red morocco, gilt with all edges gilt and gilt inner dentelles by Bayntun.

EUR 28,000.00

The first English-language edition of the epic poem of Portuguese exploration, a monument of Portuguese literature, and a work that gave a Homeric form to Renaissance-era travels and discoveries. "The 'Lusiads', as a synthesis of national sentiment and literary development, stands unchallenged as the epic of the Portuguese nation, and it celebrates more than anything else the voyage of Da Gama and the intrepid bravery of the Portuguese on land and sea" (Lach). Camoens' work was first published in Lisbon in 1572. In the early 1530s the great Portuguese historian, Joao de Barros, most famous for his "Decadas de Asia", called for an epic poem of Portuguese exploration and discovery. That call was answered later in the century by Luis de Camoens (1524-80). Camoens was educated in a monastic school in Coimbra, and produced poetry and plays at a young age. In his early twenties he was banished from Lisbon after producing a play thought to be disparaging of the royal family. He served as a soldier in the Portuguese forces besieging Ceuta in North Africa, where he lost an eye. Camoens returned to Lisbon in 1550, but found himself in more trouble, and was pardoned by the King on condition that he serve the Crown in India for five years. He arrived at Goa in late 1553 and stayed there briefly before joining an expedition to the Malabar Coast. Later he participated in a campaign against pirates on the shores of Arabia. In 1556 he left Goa again for the East Indies, taking part in the military occupation of Macao, where he remained for many months. On his return trip to India, Camoens was shipwrecked off the Mekong and wandered in Cambodia before getting to Malacca and eventually back to Goa. He did not return to Lisbon until 1570. Camoens' inspiration for his epic poem, composed in ten Cantos, was Virgil's 'Aeneid'. Camoens made explorer Vasco de Gama his hero, using his exploits as a way to glorify the achievements of the Portuguese nation, the "sons of Lusus" (the mythical first settler of Portugal). Camoens likely wrote parts of Cantos III and IV, which deal with Portuguese history, before his departure for the East, but Lach and others make a convincing case that the bulk of the poem could only have been written after Camoens had his long firsthand experience in India and Asia. Indeed, Camoens wrote much of the work while in the East. Cantos VII to X deal most directly with Asia, beginning with Da Gama's arrival in India and ending with his return to Portugal. Canto X also includes references to Mexico and Brazil. "The Lusiad" is a fine description not only of Portuguese exploits in the East, but also of the flora and fauna of Asia and India, the ethnographic details of the peoples there, and of the geography of the region, informed by Camoens' own experiences as well as familiarity with Ptolemy and Barros. The "Lusiad" was immensely popular upon its publication in 1579, appearing in several Portuguese and Spanish editions, and serving as a source for Linschoten in the preparation of his "Itinerario" in 1595. Camoens' epic poem not only sang the praises of the Portuguese nation, it also appealed to Christian Europe in calling for a common crusade against Turkish and Muslim Asia. "The 'Lusiads' is indeed the national poem par excellence and the supreme epic of Portugal's conquests in the East [...] In its stately grandeur, the 'Lusiads' is to Portuguese poetry what Barros' 'Decades' are to Portuguese prose. Their national literature never again reached such heights, nor has the literature of any other country writings to surpass these two masterpieces in their special fields" (Penrose). "The 'Lusiads' is a synthesis of all the elements included in the reality and myth of Portugal's overseas expansion. It captures the heroism and the suffering, the glory and the disillusionment, the generosity and the avarice which characterized the national enterprise. The author himself was the only major Portuguese poet to participate personally in the voyage, the wars, and the rigors of life in Asia. His epic successfully combines the personal with the national experience and provides thereby an intelligible, individualistic expression of the collective enterprise in which Portuguese of all walks of life had engaged either directly or indirectly" (Lach). - Minor toning and soiling to text, but generally quite clean. A most important work of epic poetry and of the literature of overseas expansion and the exploration of Asia.

Add to shortlist

First edition to include the classic commentaries by the author's friend
18

Camões (Camoens), Luis de. Os Lusiadas [...] Commentados pelo licenciado Manoel Correa,... examinador synodal do Arcebispado de Lisboa [...]. Lisbon, Pedro Crasbeeck, 1613. Lisbon, Pedro Crasbeeck, 1613. 4to. (6), 308 ff. Title-page with woodcut coat of arms of Portugal, further with large woodcut arms of the dedicatee Rodrigo da Cunha, woodcut initials (3 series) and a woodcut tailpiece. With the verse main text in the left column set in italic type and the prose commentary (longer and therefore often wrapping around the verses) in roman. Contemporary vellum over flexible boards, sewn on 2 supports cut flush with the book-block, with a hollow back, spine with finely pen-drawn lettering and pen decoration, headbands laced through the joints, 2 fastenings made from looped cords laced into the front board and 1 (of 2) knots laced into the back board, sprinkled edges.

EUR 25,000.00

The great epic poem of Portuguese exploration, in the original Portuguese, a monument of Portuguese literature that gave a Homeric aura to Renaissance voyages of discovery and colonial conquests, here in the first edition to include the extensive prose commentaries by the author's close friend Manuel Correia (or Correa) de Montenegro, who died before publication. In mythology Lusus, a son or companion of Bacchus, is said to have founded Lusitania, approximately corresponding to the modern kingdom of Portugal, so the Portuguese heroes of the epic are called Luciadas. "The 'Lusiads', as a synthesis of national sentiment and literary development, stands unchallenged as the epic of the Portuguese nation, and it celebrates more than anything else the voyage of Da Gama and the intrepid bravery of the Portuguese on land and sea" (Lach). Camões's work was first published in Portuguese at Lisbon in 1572. Pedro (originally Peeter van) Craesbeeck (ca. 1552-1632) was born in Louvain and worked for the great Antwerp printer and publisher Christophel Plantin and his son-in-law Balthasar Moretus before moving to Lisbon, where he set up a printing office in 1590. He quickly became Portugal's leading printer and publisher and was appointed printer to the King in 1620. He first printed Os Lusiadas in 1607 and again in 1609, but it was his present 1613 edition that first added the extensive commentaries, for most verses longer than the verse itself, which expanded the book from the 186 leaves of his earlier editions to the 308 leaves of the present. Its text, layout, (French) types and presswork set a high standard for all that followed and it remains an essential source for any study of the poem. - In the early 1530s the great Portuguese historian, João de Barros, most famous for his Decadas de Asia, had called for an epic poem of Portuguese exploration and discovery. Luis de Camões (1524-1580) answered that call four decades later. Camões was educated in a monastic school in Coimbra, and produced poetry and plays at a young age. In his early twenties he was banished from Lisbon after producing a play considered disparaging to the royal family. He served as a soldier in the Portuguese forces besieging Ceuta in North Africa, where he lost an eye. Camões returned to Lisbon in 1550, but found himself in more trouble, and was pardoned by the King on condition he serve the Crown in India for five years. He arrived at Goa in late 1553 and stayed there briefly before joining an expedition to the Malabar Coast. Later he participated in a campaign against pirates on the shores of Arabia. In 1556 he left Goa again for the East Indies, taking part in the military occupation of Macao, where he remained for many months. On his return trip to India, he was shipwrecked off the Mekong and wandered in Cambodia before reaching Malacca and eventually returning to Goa. He did not return to Lisbon until 1570. Camões's inspiration for his epic poem, composed in ten cantos, was Virgil's Aeneid. He made the explorer Vasco de Gama his great hero, using his exploits to glorify the achievements of the Portuguese nation, the "sons of Lusus". He likely wrote parts of Cantos III and IV, which deal with Portuguese history, before his departure for the East, but Lach and others convincingly argue that the bulk of the poem could only have been written after his extensive first-hand experience in India and Asia, and he wrote much of it while still in the East. Cantos VII to X deal most directly with Asia, beginning with de Gama's arrival in India and ending with his return to Portugal. Canto X also includes references to Mexico and Brazil. The Lusiads gives a fine description not only of Portuguese exploits in the East, but also of the flora and fauna of Asia and India, the ethnographic details of the peoples there, and the geography of the region, informed by Camões's own experiences as well as his familiarity with Ptolemy and Barros. The Lusiads was immensely popular upon its publication, appearing in numerous Portuguese and Spanish editions before the end of the century, and serving as a source for Linschoten in the preparation of his 1595 Itinerario. It not only sang the praises of the Portuguese nation, it also appealed to Christian Europe in calling for a common crusade against the Turks and Moslem Asia. "The 'Lusiads' is indeed the national poem par excellence and the supreme epic of Portugal's conquests in the East ... In its stately grandeur, the 'Lusiads' is to Portuguese poetry what Barros' 'Decades' are to Portuguese prose. Their national literature never again reached such heights, nor has the literature of any other country writings to surpass these two masterpieces in their special fields" (Penrose). "The 'Lusiads' is a synthesis of all the elements included in the reality and myth of Portugal's overseas expansion. It captures the heroism and the suffering, the glory and the disillusionment, the generosity and the avarice which characterized the national enterprise. The author himself was the only major Portuguese poet to participate personally in the voyage, the wars, and the rigors of life in Asia. His epic successfully combines the personal with the national experience and provides thereby an intelligible, individualistic expression of the collective enterprise in which Portuguese of all walks of life had engaged either directly or indirectly" (Lach). - With some quires browned and with 1 small worm hole running through the second half, but otherwise in good condition. Binding with a 1 x 2 cm hole in the vellum covering the spine and slightly wrinkled and dirty, but also good. The most important edition for the study of Portugal's greatest epic.

Add to shortlist

Geographical description/atlas of the old world, including the Middle East. With 33 maps and bound in well-preserved, gold-tooled contemporary calf
19

Cellarius, Christoph. Notitia orbis antiqui, sive geographia plenior, ab ortu... rerumpublicarum ad constantinorum tempora orbis terrarium faciem declarans. … et novis tabulis geographicis … illustravit. (Volume 1:) Cambridge, John Owen, 1703; (volume 2:) Amsterdam, Caspar Fritsch, 1706. (Volume 1:) Cambridge, John Owen, 1703; (volume 2:) Amsterdam, Caspar Fritsch, 1706. 4to. 2 volumes. [16], 862, [38]; [12], 544; 166, [38] pp. With engraved author's portrait, 33 engraved double-page maps and 1 engraved double-page plate. Further with both title-pages printed in red and black each with a different engraved vignette, 2 engraved headpieces, 3 woodcut tailpieces and some decorated woodcut initials. Contemporary calf, richly gold tooled spine and binding edges, double gilt fillets on sides, red edges.

EUR 5,000.00

Second edition of a geographical description/atlas of Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North Africa on the basis of classical and other (such as medieval Hebrew) sources, with 33 detailed accompanying maps. Volume two opens with a part on Asia, here including the Middle East, including chapters describing Syria, Palestine, Arabia and Mesopotamia, each with a detailed engraved map. - Cellarius (1638-1707) was professor at the University of Halle, and worked in the fields of classical and oriental languages and mathematics. The present work is considered Cellarius's most important work by Sandys and was first published in Leipzig (1701-1706). - The maps in this work, all with nicely embellished cartouches, were designed in accordance with the latest scholarly information. The first volume contains the geographical description of Europe; the second volume contains the description of Asia, the Middle East and the northern part of Africa. At the end of the second volume there are three pages of American interest Additamentum de nove orbe. - With owner's inscription on flyleaf and pastedown. Although the work is slightly browned as usual and contains a few spots and stains, the maps have very crisp impressions; good copy. The binding slightly bumped at the corners and a couple minor spots on the sides, otherwise very good with the tooling very well-preserved.

Add to shortlist

Navigating from Venice to the Middle East in Balbi's times: a handwritten manual
20

Cesareo, Agostino. L'arte della navigatione con il regimento della Tramontana,... e del sole, e la regola del flusso, e reflusso delle acque. [Italy, final third of the 16th century]. 4to. 52 ff., with a final blank f. foliated "53". Manuscript on paper, written by one scribe in a careful humanistic script, with penwork grottesche on f1r, 4 working volvelles, 6 text illustrations and other tables. Watermark resembling the type Briquet 633: a northern Italian Angel design attested at Padova (1553), Salo (1572-76), and Udine (1579). Later period-style vellum.

EUR 85,000.00

Unpublished, charmingly illustrated handwritten manual of navigation in the Levante as well as in the south seas, representing the state of Italian navigational art in the second half of the 16th century. The text is divided into six parts, the first of which deals with cosmography and navigation in general. The second treats the subject of navigation by the North Star (with a particularly evocative volvelle including a tiny ocean-going ship that circles the globe from pole to pole); part three discusses navigation in the southern hemisphere, by the Southern Cross and the south celestial pole. Part four describes navigation by the altitude of the sun (with extensive examples and tables, including the meridians throughout the Mediterranean), followed by "la regola della navigatione di Levante in ponente per longitudine". Part five is occupied with the action of the tides, including details on the various hazards of the English channel and the Strait of Messina, and contains a striking sketch of the man in the moon, controller of tides. Part six, finally, contains latitudinal readings "di tutto il Levante", and further astronomical references. Remarkably, the latitude for Constantinople (43 degrees and no minutes) describes the capital of the Ottoman Empire as "la famosa città di Constantinopoli hoggi possessa da Soltan Soliman Imperator de' Turchi", which would date the ms. at 1566 at the latest. However, a few other copies of the text are known, all of which would appear to be produced slightly later than this date: a somewhat smaller copy formerly in the National Maritime Museum and now MS 562 at the Beinecke Library (72 ff.) is dated "1567", while the British Museum holds a copy (74 ff., MS Add. 25882) with a preface (and sonnet) to Paolo Sforza, dated 1570 (possibly a presentation fair copy?). Yet another copy is kept at the Vatican (De Ricci, Census, p. 1899: with the ecclesiastical censors' imprimatur, though no printed edition is known), and an anonymous ms. is in the Library of Congress (Ms. Ac. 4325). It is therefore likely that Cesareo composed his navigational treatise before 1567 and that, on account of its usefulness, within a period of roughly a decade several ms. copies were produced, of which this is one. Clearly drawn up in the later sixteenth century, this is precisely the kind of manual that would have been in the hands of the merchant navigators on whose ships the Venetian jeweller Gasparo Balbi famously travelled to India and Arabia during the years 1579-88, when he made the first European record of Bani Yas, as well as of Abu Dhabi and Dubai by their modern names. - Ownership inscription of Giovanni Krabbe, dated 3 Oct. 1604, on integral blank f. preceding the text. Covers insignificantly warped. A very clean, nearly unbrowned manuscript, with all the volvelles complete and in good condition. From the collection of the eminent Johns Hopkins historian Frederic C(hapin) Lane (1900-84), who specialized in Italian shipbuilding and established mediaeval Venetian economic history as a discipline: purchased in Venice in 1928 during work on the subject. Includes photocopies of Lane's correspondence with Albert Cohn, Leipzig (1926, regarding the purchase of other mss.), Eva G. R. Taylor (1935-36, regarding Cesareo and his "Arte della navigatione"), and Paul Kristeller (1977, regarding inclusion of the ms. in his "Iter Italicum").

Add to shortlist

72 plates with remarkably intricate Islamic-inspired decoration, printed with coloured inks
21

Clerget, Charles Ernest. Mélanges d'ornements de tous les styles Persan -... Mauresque - Arabe - Grec - Gothique [-] Renaissance principalement des XVIe et XVIIe siècles [...]. Paris, Ducher & Cie (colophon: printed by Eugène Heutte & Cie), ca. 1880 (engraved 1837-1838). Paris, Ducher & Cie (colophon: printed by Eugène Heutte & Cie), ca. 1880 (engraved 1837-1838). Royal folio (45 x 31 cm). With a letterpress title-page with Ducher's wood-engraved device, 2 elaborately ornamented part-titles, 70 numbered ornament plates (all 72 plates "engraved" on litho stones, image area mostly 26.5 x 17 cm) and a letterpress list of the plates. With each plate printed in blue, green, violet, ochre, red, black or brown (several shades) and 9 printed in 2 colours. [2] ll. plus [1], 37, [1], 38-70 plates. Contemporary half red cloth, straight-combed marbled sides, "Italian"-marbled endpapers. Rebacked and with new corners in red goatskin morocco, covering most of the original cloth.

EUR 6,500.00

A splendid display of ornament in a wide variety of mostly Islamic-influenced styles, described as Persian, Moorish, arabesque, Greek, gothic and renaissance. Although many "arabesque" styles had been used in Europe under various names, Europe's growing colonial and trade relations with the Islamic world in the early 19th-century led to a greater familiarity with Islamic ornament and a new fashion for its application in Western art. The present plates were conceived, drawn and "engraved" by Charles Ernest Clerget (1812-1875?) and originally published by Émile Leconte in 2 parts (issued in 12 sub-parts) from 1837 to 1838. They are printed in a wide variety of colours, mostly in a single colour for each plate (though the variation in pattern, texture and thickness of line often gives the impression of varying shades) but at least in the present copy 9 plates are printed in 2 colours. Most of these make use of a split fount (4, 7, 11, 25, and 55) but 2 or 3 (6, 52 and probably 59) were inked à la poupée, that is, by dabbing the colours onto the different parts of the stone. They were intended in part as models for artists and architects. Clerget was a lithographer and he produced the plates by what is called "stone engraving": the litho stone was coated with a water-soluble ground and the images drawn with a very sharp stylus, exposing the stone under the ground. A greasy substance was then applied to the stone and would stick to the exposed parts, the ground was washed away, and the image could then be printed lithographically. This technique was proposed by Senefelder and allowed extremely fine lines. - Clerget dated his second part-title "1837", while the first part-title and the letterpress general title-page are undated. The titling capitals on the two letterpress leaves, however, are the Augustaux capitals designed by Louis Perrin and first used in De Boissieu, Inscriptions antiques de Lyon, 1846-1854: one of the first new printing types to "revive" an antique style. Several catalogues date this edition 1880, which accords with the names and addresses of the publisher and printer. The letterpress leaves and plates are printed on unwatermarked wove paper. - In very good condition. A magnificent display of remarkably intricate arabesque and other decoration in 72 plates.

Add to shortlist

Suppressing the East African slave trade in the Gulf region
22

Colomb, Philip Howard. Slave-catching in the Indian Ocean. A record of... naval experiences. London, Longmans, Green & Co. (colophon: printed by Spottiswoode & Co.), 1873. London, Longmans, Green & Co. (colophon: printed by Spottiswoode & Co.), 1873. 8vo. VIII, [3], [1 black], 503, [1 blank] pp. With 8 steel-engraved illustration plates including the frontispiece (the 5 signed ones engraved by Pearson), a folding map of the Indian Ocean, Red Sea and the Gulf, hand-coloured in outline (lithographed by Edward Weller), and one line of music notes in the text.Contemporary polished tan calf, sewn on recessed cords with a hollow back, but with 5 false bands on the spine, each board with a gold- and blind-tooled border, gold-tooled board edges, "zebra"-marbled endpapers and edges, headbands in green, white and red. Rebacked with the original red morocco spine label on what appears to be an older (ca. 1700?) richly gold-tooled backstrip with more than a hundred impressions of about a dozen mostly pointillé stamps.

EUR 3,250.00

First edition (only edition until a 1968 facsimile) of a very detailed and well-illustrated account of a British naval campaign to suppress the East African slave trade in the years 1868 to 1870, published only eight year after the end of the United States' Civil War and the abolition of slavery there. Slavery was not outlawed in the Ottoman Empire (which at the time of publication included Egypt and what is now Iraq) until 1882 and in Iran and most of the Gulf States not until the 20th century. The book was written by Captain Philip Howard Colomb (1831-1899), Commander of the HMS Dryad from 1868 to 1870, who lead the campaign. He operated primarily in and around the Gulf, Oman and Zanzibar, and captured seven slave ships during those two years. The illustrations show the Dryad and some of the slave ships, individual and group portraits of slaves encountered during the campaign and views of ports where slave trading occurred. One of the group portraits was engraved after a photograph made by one of the Dryad's officers and other illustrations after drawings by other officers. The map ("The slave trading waters of the Indian Ocean") shows the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Red Sea and the Gulf, including Madagascar and the other islands. The first chapter relates Colomb's voyage to Aden, where he took command of the Dryad, and the next two chapters give extensive background information to put the account of the campaign in its proper context. Colomb's account of his own campaign includes chapters on individual regions (Bombay, Muscat and Oman, the Gulf, Madagasgar, Zanzibar, etc.) and on topics (slaves on board ship, the slave market, etc.). Colomb was promoted to Admiral after his retirement from active duty. The book is sometimes mistakenly ascribed to his younger brother, John Charles Ready Colomb. - With very minor foxing in the folding map and the page facing it, but otherwise in fine condition. The binding is rebacked as noted and shows a few stains and scuff marks. An essential primary source for any study of the slave trade, especially in the Gulf region.

Add to shortlist

23

Corbett, Sir John, Royal Navy admiral (1822-1893). Middle East Campaigns. Watercolours and sketches from the... Bosporus, Syria, and Egypt, signed "J. C." Various places, c. 1837-1845. Various places, c. 1837-1845. Folio (290 x 441 mm). 23 watercolours, 11 pencil drawings, mounted. Brown quarter calf with contemporary marbled boards.

EUR 20,000.00

Stunning collection of paintings and drawings by Sir John Corbett, realized during his naval campaigns in the Ottoman Mediterranean. Corbett joined the Navy in 1835 and was promoted to the rank of Commander in 1852, then to Captain in 1857. He served in the 1856-60 Second Opium War, fought by Britain and France against the Qing dynasty of China, and was made Commander in Chief, East Indies, in 1877. An amateur painter, he regularly brought home drawings and watercolours from his travels. The present collection comprises his earliest such works, prepared between the ages of 15 and 22 during service in the Mediterranean - at the beginning of his career both as a sailor and as a painter. While the first series of the album, the work of a talented boy still honing his skills, is dedicated to Turkey and the Bosporus (1837-38), the second, showing the coasts of Syria, Mount Lebanon and Egypt (1840-1841), reveals a more fully developed draughtsman and colourist. The collection also includes sketches of Malta (1843), Tangiers (1845), Liverpool, and Lisbon. The sun-drenched coastal views of Middle East, the scenes of attack on Tortosa in Syria and of the English armada at Beirut to which he was a witness are mostly signed and captioned, sometimes on the reverse, sometimes with an additional label added later by the artist. A beautiful set.

Add to shortlist

1300 years of Egyptian mosques in 243 splendid plates, mostly photogravures and chromolithographs
24

Creswell, Keppel Archibald Cameron, and others. The mosques of Egypt from 21 H. (641)... to 1365 H. (1946) being a series of views in colour and monochrome of the principal mosques of Egypt with a brief note on each monument ... accompanied by detailed plans and maps. Including: [wrapper-title:] Index to Mohammedan monuments in Cairo. [Giza], Survey of Egypt, 1951. [Giza], Survey of Egypt, 1951. ([2], 11, [3], 14, [2], 13, [3 blank] pp.). And: Giza, The Survey of Egypt, 1949[-1954]. 2 volumes. [5], [1 blank], [4], A-D, 2-68, [1 blank], [1], [1 blank]; [5], [1 blank], A-B, [1], 69-133, [1], [1 blank] pp. Double Crown folio (44 x 35 cm). Each volume with the chromolithographed title-page and frontispiece, showing arabesque decoration in 6 colours plus black and gold; 243 plates (image size mostly about 30 x 23 cm) showing mosques and architectural and decorative details (27 in colour): 216 in photogravure with sepia ink, 2 in photogravure with chromolithographed colour, 3 chromolithographed (1 in 3 colours plus black and gold; 2 in 5 colours), and 22 in halftone offset lithography after paintings by Alhusain Fawzy. Further with about 100 offset lithographic line illustrations on the integral leaves (many full-page) showing buildings, floor plans and various details. Text in red and black, set in Caslon types reproduced by offset lithography. The present second issue also includes 2 large folding chromolithographed maps (each 81 x 111 cm) at a scale of 1:5000 in a pocket, dated 1950, showing the location of the monuments in Cairo, and the loosely inserted index to these maps, dated 1951.Gold- and blind-blocked dark green coated cloth with a morocco texture, sewn on 3 recessed cords with hollow backs, each board with a blind decorative frame with the title and a small rosette in gold on the front (the rosette repeated on the spine) and a large rosette in gold on the back.

EUR 7,500.00

First English edition (second issue, with 2 chromolithographed maps added) of a splendid display of views, many in colour, of Egyptian mosques dating from 21 AH (641 CE) to 1365 AH (1946 CE), an official Egyptian government publication first published in Arabic in 1946 and here translated into English. Creswell himself called it "the finest piece of book production achieved in Egypt". Plates 1-206 show the mosques in chronological order, including exteriors, interiors and many architectural and decorative details, nearly every plate showing a single large image. These are followed by several series of plates covering specific aspects, mostly with multiple images per plate: 33 minarets (207-217), 18 domes (218-222), 11 examples of woodwork (223-227), 16 lamps (228-231), 9 chandeliers (232-234), 15 examples of various kinds of columns and capitals (235), 16 window grilles (236-239), 2 marble floors (240-241: the photogravures with chromolithographed colour), 10 examples of cresting (242) and 12 door knockers (243). The 133-page text discusses the history and form of all these mosques and their decorative work, with about a hundred line illustrations, including floor plans, elevations, sections, architectural and decorative details, kufic and other inscriptions and furnishings. The two 5-colour lithographs of faïence arabesque decoration are stunning, apparently printed with special glossy inks, and the photogravures provide lovely views of the mosques and details. The colour plates are protected by glassine tissue guard leaves. - The preliminaries list the members of the committee responsible for producing the book but do not credit specific authors. A leaf with most of the original introduction another presumably containing the original preface have been cancelled in the present issue and replaced by a loosely inserted bifolium with the new introduction and preface, the latter dated 1954. Since Creswell signed the preface the book is usually catalogued under his name, but the last sentence of the original introduction (covered by a slip on page 2 in the present issue) notes that the English text was translated from the Arabic by the architect Ali Gamal ad-Din Hassanyn Afendi, so the principal authors were probably native Arabic speakers. - In fine condition with only a small tear in one guard leaf and a couple minor marginal smudges. The binding is slightly worn at the hinges but still very good. A splendid view of Egyptian mosques and their decorative work, with 243 plates and a hundred additional illustrations.

Add to shortlist

The first step toward British government control of India
25

[East India Company]. Anno decimo tertio Georgii III. Regis. An Act... for establishing certain Regulations for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company, as well in India as in Europe. [Fi al-sanath al-salisah `ashar min julus al-Malik Jurj al-Salis. Dasturi bara-yi istihkam-i bandubast-i mushakhkhas banabar bihbudi intizam-i mu` amalat-i Inglish Kampani dar Hindustan chunankih dar Firangistan]. London, Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 1774. London, Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 1774. Small folio (232 x 280 mm). 36 ff. Contemp. marbled wrappers. All edges gilt.

EUR 18,000.00

The Regulating Act of 1773, published in Persian and English on opposite pages. - British interest in the Persia and the Arabian Gulf originated in the 16th century and steadily increased as British India’s importance rose in the 18th century. In the beginning, the agenda was primarily of a commercial character: realizing the region's significance, the British fleet supported Shah Abbas in expelling the Portuguese from Hormuz in 1622. In return, the British East India Company was permitted to establish a trading post in the coastal city of Bandar 'Abbas, which became their principal port in the Gulf. The Company became responsible for conducting British foreign policy in the region, and concluded various treaties, agreements and engagements with Gulf states. In 1763 the EIC established a permanent residency at Bushehr, on the Persian side of the Gulf. By the early 1770s, the East India Company was in severe financial straights due both to corruption and nepotism as well as from steeply declining tea sales to America and heavy annual payments made to maintain the trading monopoly. When approached for assistance, the government enacted legislation to supervise ("regulate") the activities of the Company. This "Act for establishing certain Regulations for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company" constituted the first step toward eventual British government control of India, thus radically limiting the role of EIC in the administration of India. In 1784, little more than a decade later, Pitt's India Act would take reforms even further. - Another issue in the same year is known, with identical typesetting, but in which each page of text is enclosed within an engraved frame (these copies are printed in a taller folio format ). Slight edge repairs; spine restored. From the library of William Aldersey, president of the board of trade in Bengal, with his ownership (dated 1774) to recto of f. 1.

Add to shortlist

The Trucial States: the relevant treaties published for the first time
26

[East India Company]. Minutes of evidence taken before the select committee... on the affairs of the East India Company and also an appendix and index. VI. Political or Foreign. London, for the House of Commons, 16 August 1832. London, for the House of Commons, 16 August 1832. Folio (214 x 334 mm). X, 565, (3) pp. With 1 folding map. Modern wrappers with cover label.

EUR 9,500.00

Includes the first publication of the treaties closed by the British with the Gulf sheikhdoms following General W. Grant Keir's raid on Ras al-Khaimah in 1819/20: the preliminary treaties with Hassan bin Rama (Ras al-Khaimah, 8 Jan. 1820); Sultan bin Sakr (9 Jan. 1820), Sheikh Kameya bin Mahomed bin Jabin al Moyeying, Skeikh of Kishmee, of Dubai (9 Jan. 1820), Skeikh Shakhbool bin Dhyab of Abu Dhabi (11 Jan. 1820), Hassan bin Ali, for Sharjah, Umm al-Quwain, Ajman, and Abu Dhabi (15 Jan. 1830). Also, Sketch of the Articles proposed to H.H. the Imaum of Muscat for the Prevention of the Foreign Slave Trade, in 1822. - Slight waterstaining near beginning, but well-preserved. Rare.

Add to shortlist

Allan Sillitoe's Persian Gulf Pilot
27

(Edgell, J. A. [ed.]). Persian Gulf Pilot. Comprising the Persian Gulf and... its approaches, from Ras al Hadd, in the South-West, to Cape Monze, in the East. Ninth edition. All bearings are true. Includes: Supplement No. 4. - 1948 relating to the Persian Gulf Pilot, Ninth edition, 1942 corrected to 27th November 1948. London, Hydrographic Department, Admiralty / Lowe & Brydone, 1942. London, Hydrographic Department, Admiralty / Lowe & Brydone, 1942. 8vo. (2), XXVI, 286, (2) pp. With several maps and plates. Original cloth. Supplement: 34 pp. Original wrappers.

EUR 4,000.00

Important and detailed navigational manual of the Gulf coast, including the rare 1948 supplement. "The Persian Gulf Pilot contains sailing directions for the Persian gulf and the approaches thereto, from Ras al Hadd, in the south-west, to Cape Monze, in the East". - Also includes copious information on politics, population, languages, trade, currencies, pearl fishery, meteorological information (climate, winds, weather, temperature, humidity), as well as currents, tides, communications and other miscellaneous information. - Binding rubbed. Only two copies in auction records of the past decades (Peter Hopkirk's copy fetching £1,300 at Sotheby's, Oct 14, 1998, lot 1043). Supplement has note on cover: "whenever reference is made to the pilot (1942), this supplement must be consulted". - The personal copy of Alan Sillitoe (1928-2010), one of the most important British writers of the postwar era, with his autogr. ownership on the title page. Sillitoe had joined the RAF near the end of WWII and served for two years as a radio operator in the Malayan Emergency; it is likely that he acquired the volume at this time.

Add to shortlist

28

Eerelman, Otto. Pferderassen. 40 Kunstblätter nach Gemälden von Otto Eerelmann... und Rich. Schoenbeck mit Text von Rich. Schoenbeck, Major a. D. Berlin, Eduard Eggebrecht, [1903-1905]. Berlin, Eduard Eggebrecht, [1903-1905]. Large oblong folio (454 x 395 mm). (2), 40 chromolithographed plates. Stored loosely in original cloth portfolio.

EUR 12,000.00

Extremely rare first German edition of the finest 19th-c. Dutch work on horses. It contains 40 chromo-lithographs after paintings by Eerelman. The set depicts thoroughbreds from all over the world, including Arabian, Barb, Turkish, Anglo-Arab, Andalusian (Spanish), Thoroughbred, and Lippizaner horses. - This portfolio was issued without the 115 pp. of text by Richard Schoenbeck. Portfolio is a little rubbed and bumped; plates very finely preserved, with occasional minimal edge flaws.

Add to shortlist

29

[Egypt]. Permit for a donkey to enter the Hejaz... region. [Cairo, late nineteenth century]. 195 x 137 mm. Lithographed document in Arabic with an image of a donkey. Validated with two official blue ink stamps.

EUR 5,000.00

Very rare Egyptian issued permit for a donkey to enter the holy sites of Mecca and Medina. - With ms. notes in Arabic.

Add to shortlist

First edition of the Pentateuch in Arabic
30

Erpenius, Thomas. Turat Musa al-Nabi alayhi al-salam id est Pentateuchus... Mosis Arabicè. Leiden, Thomas Erpenius for Johannes Maire, 1622. Leiden, Thomas Erpenius for Johannes Maire, 1622. 4to. (16), 458, (2) pp. With the title in a woodcut architectural frame, head- and tailpieces built up from cast arabesque fleurons, woodcut factotums. 18th-century sprinkled calf, sewn on 5 cords, gold-tooled spine with red sheepskin label, waved combed paste-downs, red and blue sprinkled edges.

EUR 16,500.00

First printing of the Pentateuch in Arabic characters (Smitskamp). Edited by Thomas Erpenius and printed with his influential nashk Arabic types, cut under his direction by Arent Corsz. Hogenacker in Leiden. It gives the text of a 13th-century translation of the Pentateuch in the Maghreb dialect (spoken in Mauritania). Erpenius was one of the most distinguished orientalists and by far the best Arabist of his day. He published an influential Arabic grammar and several excellent critical editions. His own private printing office, equipped with Hebrew, Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic and Turkish type, produced its first works as early as 1615. Hogenacker later cut more Arabic types and his heirs sold Arabic and other punches and matrices to Oxford University for their embryonic printing office. From the library of the noted Swedish orientalist, translator and librarian Carl Aurivilius (1717-1786) with his manuscript bookplate on the paste-down, dated 1750. Further with 18th-centry owners'inscriptions: "Lesinus Olbers [?] Ups[ala]. 1782", "Carol Johannes Knos Upsaliae 1797 [?]" and modern Uppsala library stamps. A few leaves with a faint waterstain a the foot, some spotting. The binding chafed, the head of the spine slightly damaged and the edges of the endleaves browned. Otherwise in very good condition and with generous margins.

Add to shortlist