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Three scarce works of Christian mysticism

[Bertholdus]. Horologium devotionis circa vitam Christi. [Basel, J. Amerbach, not after 1490]. [Basel, J. Amerbach, not after 1490]. 8vo. Gothic type. 66 unn. ff. (incl. final blank). With 36 coloured woodcuts in the text. (Bound with) II: Thomas Aquinas. Novum insigneq[ue] opusculu[m] pro Christi verbu[m] eva[n]geliza[n]tibus. Ubi plures et copiosi: et aurei sermones co[n]tinentt[ur]: de septe[m] peccatis mortalibus. Basel, M. Furter, 1514. 36 unn. ff. (incl. final blank). Title page printed in red and black. (Bound with) III: St John Chrysostomus. Libellus cui est titulus Neminem posse ledi nisi a semetipso. [Basel, A. Petri], 1509. 24 unn. ff. With full-page coloured woodcut on reverse of title page. Early 16th century pigskin binding over wooden boards, richly blindstamped with floral tools. A single central clasp.

EUR 25,000.00

I: First Basel edition. "Devotional work in the mystical tradition, first written in German, then - at the request of the educated - translated into Latin. The woodcuts are by the master of the 'Bereittung'; [...] and by the master of 'Heinz Narr'" (cf. Hieronymus). All woodcuts in stark contemporary colour, mainly in yellow but also in grey and occasional blue. 16th-century ownerships and old stamps to title page. - II: Rare edition. Contains the "Regulae quaedam perutiles, quae ad omnes religiosos pertinent" and "Tabula super totius quadragesimae evangeliis et epistolis" (an extract from the Summa theologica). - III: Exceedingly rare edition. The fine woodcut, coloured in yellow and green hues, is attributed to Hans Baldung Grien. "Anonymous printing [...], attributed by Benzing to the Basel printer Petri. The woodcut, without intrinsic connection to the text, shows Christ on Mount Olivet with three sleeping disciples in the foreground and the henchmen nearing. Its style points to Dürer's school rather than Basel" (cf. Hieronymus). - Several 16th century ownerships by one Ulrich Fuchsli on front pastedown as well as title and end of third work. An exceptionally well preserved sammelband containing three scarce works of Christian mysticism. The last copy of the Horologium sold in the trade was incomplete (Sotheby's, July 1, 1994, lot 48: £7,000, to Tenschert). {BN#32369}
¶ I: I. Hain/C. 2993 (= H. 2990 & 8928). GW 4175. BMC III, 753. Goff B-506. Fairfax Murray 60. Schramm XXI, 617, 620, 632, 679-709. Hieronymus, Inkunabelholzschnitte 44. - II: VD 16, T 1024 (R 642 & S 5890). Stockmeyer/R. 84, 46. - III: VD 16, J 438. Hieronymus 81.

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Gothic binding

Martinus Polonus. Sermones de tempore et de sanctis cum promptuario... exemplorum. Strasbourg, [Georg Husner], 1484. Strasbourg, [Georg Husner], 1484. Folio (224 x 318 mm). 255 unnumbered ff. (last blank). Gothic type, 2 cols., 46 lines. Rubricated throughout. With title border painted in red and orange, large initial "S" in several colours with pretty flower and tenril designs, red colophone border and numerous red and blue initials. Contemp. blindstamped pigskin over wooden boards with 2 metal clasps (wants fittings). Ms. spine label.

EUR 24,000.00

Probably the editio princeps of this collection of homiletic samples by Martin von Troppau (d. after 22 June 1278), rubricated and with pretty initials throughout. The alleged earlier edition cited by Hain, supposedly printed in Strasbourg in 1480 (H 10853), appears to be a ghost. - Martinus Polonus (also known as Martin von Troppau or Martinus Oppaviensis) is regarded as one of the most respected chroniclers of the Middle Ages. - Some 6 ff. remargined at bottom, 2 more leaves show loss to corners. Somewhat browned and brownstained; several contemporary marginalia. Worming to beginning and end (touching text in final third). Binding rubbed and bumped; defect to back cover and numerous wormholes. The pretty Gothic blindstamping shows hunting scenes, floral designs, and the Agnus Dei (not recorded in Schunke, Schwenke collection). Splendid hand-painted armorial bookplate of Wolfgang Crener von Sulzbach (fl. c. 1510), a scholar of canon law; several later ownership entries, stamps, bookplate. {BN#27972}
¶ Hain 10854. Goff M-329. GW M 21433. ISTC im00329000. Pellechet 7628. IGI 6245. Proctor 591. BMC I, 132. Walsh 221. CIBN M-184. BSB M-238. Wierzbowski III, 2013. Estreicher XXII, 201.

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A lost Arabic text on the use of drugs

Serapion, Johannes, the younger. Liber Serapionis aggregatus in medicinis simplicibus. [Add. Galenus]:... De virtute centaureae. Venice, Reynaldus de Novimagio (Rainald of Nimeguen), 8 June 1479. Venice, Reynaldus de Novimagio (Rainald of Nimeguen), 8 June 1479. Folio. 136 leaves. 17th calf (rebacked).

EUR 22,000.00

Latin translation of an Arabic treatise on simple drugs, traditionally attributed to "Pseudo-Serapion" (or Serapion the Younger), but recently identified as the "Kitab al-adwiya almufrada" (Book on Simple Drugs) by Ibn Wafid (d. 1067), a pharmacologist and physician from Toledo. Ibn Al-Wafid was a man of immense knowledge in all medical matters and therapeutics, with the skills to treat grave and insidious diseases and affliction. He preferred dietetic measures; if drugs were needed, he gave precedence to the simplest ones over compound drugs, and among these, he recommended the least complex, to be used only sparingly and in the lowest dosage possible. While the original Arabic version of the book is considered lost, a manuscript written in Hebrew-Arabic as well as partial translations in Latin and Catalan are preserved. This translation was prepared around 1290 by Simon Januensis (Simon of Genoa) and Abraham ben Shem-Tob of Tortosa. Very rare: a single copy in postwar auction records (Sotheby's, 1977: £1500). {BN#46767}
¶ HC 14692*. Goff S468. GW M41691. Proctor 4433. BMC V 255. BSB-Ink S-300. GAL S I, 887. P. Dilg, "The Liber aggregatus in medicinis simplicibus of Pseudo Serapion: An Influential Work of Medical Arabism", in: Islam and the Italian Renaissance, ed. by C. Burnett and A. Contadini, Warburg Institute Colloquia 5 (London, 1999), pp. 221-231. P. E. Pormann, "Yuhanna ibn Sarabiyun: Further Studies into the Transmission of his Works", in: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 14 (2004), 233-262.

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Utopia: against the new statesmanship of all-powerful autocracy

More, Sir Thomas. De optimo reip. statu deque nova insula Utopia... libelluns vere aureus [...]. Basel, (Johann Froben, 1518). Basel, (Johann Froben, 1518). 4to. 162 pp., fol. 163-164, (2) pp. (a-s4 t6 u6, without the 'Epigrammata' announced on the title). With woodcut title border and a border in the text by Hans Holbein the younger, 2 woodcuts in the text (1 full-page) by Ambrosius Holbein, and 6 woodcut initials; printer's device on final page. Modern giltstamped full calf.

EUR 20,000.00

Rare third, revised edition (the first one printed in Basel) of the famous "ideal state" novel that gave its name to a whole literary genre. Edited by Erasmus of Rotterdam, whom More had sent the manuscript in 1516. The second part, about the ideal constitution for a state, was written first, while More was an envoy in Flanders in 1515, while part one was written only in 1516, after his return to England. The two woodcuts by Ambrosius Holbein, Hans's elder brother, include the famous bird's-eye view of the island of Utopia (a full-page illustration) and the charming scene showing the story's fictional traveller, Raphael Hythlodaeus, in discussion with More himself and his Antwerpian friend Peter Gilles (Aegidius), with More's young assistant John Clement (later to become a Royal Physician and More's son-in-law) approaching them. Like 'Gulliver's Travels', Utopia was written "as a tract for the times, to rub in the lesson of Erasmus; it inveighs against the new statesmanship of all-powerful autocracy and the new economics [...], just as it pleads for religious tolerance and universal education [...] More had all Swift's gift for utterly convincing romance: the beginning, when Rafael Hythlodaye recounts his voyages, has a vividness which draws the reader on into the political theory. [More] is a saint to the Catholic, and a predecessor of Marx to the Communist. His manifesto is and will be required reading for both, and for all shades of opinion between" (PMM). - Insignificant browning; endpapers somewhat fingerstained, but a beautiful, clean copy. Handwritten ownership of Gerard van Assendelft, dated 1603, at the top edge of the title-page. {BN#46924}
¶ VD 16, M 6299. Adams M 1756. Panzer VI, 205, 222. Isaac 14177. Heckethorn 100, 90. Bezzel (Erasmusdrucke) 912. Hieronymus 260. Kat. Basel 1960, 343, 341, 120f. Gibson 3. Van der Haeghen III, 41. Cf. PMM 47.

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Incunabular Ship of Fools

[Brant, Sebastian. Stultifera navis. Tr: Jacobus Locher Philomusus. Add: Thomas... Beccadelli; Jacobus Locher Philomosus: Carmina varia]. Basel, Johann Bergmann, de Olpe, 1. III. 1498. Basel, Johann Bergmann, de Olpe, 1. III. 1498. 4to. 146 (instead of 164) ff., wanting fols. 1, 9, 15, 51, 56-58, 81-82, 96-97, the four unnumbered leaves after 144, 157-159, and the final blank. With 108 (instead of 117) woodcuts in the text and printer's device at the end. Early 19th century half calf over papered boards with giltstamped spine label. Edges sprinkled.

EUR 18,000.00

Early, if incomplete Latin edition of the famous "Narrenschiff", originally published in German verse in 1494 - also by Bergmann - and translated by the author's student Jacob Locher. One of literature's most famous satires and a milestone in the history of book illustration: many of the woodcuts depicting human foibles (here printed from the original blocks) are now attributed to the young Albrecht Dürer. Before Goethe's "Werther" arrived on the scene, this work was the most successful book ever published in Germany, immensely popular and read until it fell to pieces, and complete copies of the incunabular Basel editions are nearly unobtainable. - In his "Ship of Fools", Brant describes the voyage of a ship bearing one hundred fools, to the fools' paradise of Narragonia, thereby satirizing the follies of his time including representatives of every human and social type. "[T]he first original work by a German which passed into world literature [... it] helped to blaze the trail that leads from medieval allegory to modern satire, drama and novel of character" (PMM). Erwin Panofsky called the book "a remarkably complete mirror of human life", based upon the "universality of Brant's self-righteous surliness [...] and the picturesqueness of his metaphors" (Panofsky, p. 30). Incidentally, the book also contains the earliest literary reference to the discovery of America: "Hesperie occidue rex Ferdinandus: in alto Aequore nunc gentes repperit innumeras" ("Ferdinand, King of the West, recently discovered innumerable peoples across the high seas", fol. 76v). Tellingly, the humanist-printer Bergmann had published the famous "Columbus letter" in 1493. - Some browning and brownstaining; occasional underlinings by a near-contemporary hand (more frequent in the beginning and within the chapter on women). Folio b2 is loosened. Rebound in the 18th century (edges trimmed fairly closely). Small hole in the spine, otherwise well-preserved copy from the collection of the Swedish statesman and diplomat Lars von Engeström (1751-1826) with his engraved armorial bookplate (motto "speravit infestis", "hopeful in adversity") to pastedown. {BN#49042}
¶ Hain 3751*. Goff B-1091; GW 5062. Bod-inc. B-513. Sheppard 2560. Proctor 7778. BSB-Ink B-821. Hieronymus, Buchillus. 195. Cf. PMM 37. Harrise, BAV, Additions, no. 21.

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Avicenna on fevers

[Avicenna (Ibn Sina)]. Arcolani, Giovanni. De febribus [...] in Avic[ennae] quarti canonis fen... primam. Dilucida atque optima expositio [...]. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1560. Venice, heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, 1560. Folio (240 x 354 mm). (18), 191 ff. (without final blank). Printer's device on title page and, in a different version, on the last page. Contemporary cardboard binding with marbled spine and ms. label. Stored in custom-made cloth-and-paper slipcase.

EUR 18,000.00

First issue under this title, previously released as "Expositio in primam fen quarti canonis Avicennae" (1506). A commentary (with the text, in the version of Gerardus Cremonensis) of book four, part (fen) one of Avicenna's systematic "Canon of Medicine", written in Arabic but widely translated throughout the Middle Ages and the basis of medical training in the West as late as the mid-17th century. It continues in use to this day in parts of the Arab world. Through this encyclopedic work, the author exerted "perhaps a wider influence in the eastern and western hemispheres than any other Islamic thinker" (PMM). "The 'Qanun' [...] contains some of the most illuminating thoughts pertaining to distinction of mediastinitis from pleurisy; contagious nature of phthisis; distribution of diseases by water and soil; careful description of skin troubles; of sexual diseases and perversions; of nervous ailments" (Sarton, Introduction to the History of Science). The present part is dedicated to a discussion of feverish illnesses. - 18th century ownership "Manhem" on title page. Some brownstaining throughout, as common; some waterstains near end; occasional inkstains and marginal annotations. An untrimmed, comparatively wide-margined copy. {BN#46144}
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 2345. Adams A 1541. Durling 245. Cf. Wellcome I, 387 (only the Venice reprint). PMM 11.

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The first book about the game of football

(Bardi, Giovanni de'). Discorso sopra 'l giuoco del calcio fiorentino. Del... puro Accademico Alterato. Di nuovo ristampato. Florence, appresso Cosimo Giunti, 1615. Florence, appresso Cosimo Giunti, 1615. 4to. 48 pp. With armorial woodcut and folding engraved plate. Contemporary limp vellum with ms. title to spine.

EUR 18,000.00

The earliest treatise - and only early monograph - on the historical precursor to the modern game of football (or soccer), namely the game of "Calcio" traditionally played by young men in Florence's Piazza Santa Croce during the Carnival season. The book explains the mechanics of the game, provides its historical background, and describes actual games played in and around Florence in the recent past. The detailed account was first published in 1580 and reprinted in 1615, unchanged save for a new dedication and preface by the printer, Cosimo Giunti, who also reveals the author's name as Giovanni de' Bardi, Conte di Vernio. The engraving shows a fine view of the Piazza with the players on the field immediately before kick-off. The title page shows the Medici arms: the book is dedicated to Archduchess Maria Maddalena of Austria, Grand Duchess of Tuscany as wife of Cosimo II de' Medici. {BN#49576}
¶ Melzi II, 388. Moreni I, 84. Bascetta, Sport e Giuochi I, 129. Cf. Parenti 54f. (1st ed.). Inghirami I, 60. Cicognara 1570; Gamba 98f. (later eds. only).

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A military manual, published within two decades of the invention of letterpress printing

Vegetius, Flavius Renatus. Epithomia rei militaris, libri numero quatuor. [Cologne], N[ikolaus] G[ötz], [ca. 1475]. [Cologne], N[ikolaus] G[ötz], [ca. 1475]. Folio (217 x 297 mm). 36 (instead of 40) ff. [a-d10], wanting the first and final blanks (as common) and leaves [a]5-6, missing text supplied in near-contemporary manuscript (but omitting initials). 38 lines, 2 columns, 3- and 4-line Lombardic initials supplied in red, red initial strokes and paraphs. 19th century unsophisticated boards.

EUR 18,000.00

One of the earliest editions of Vegetius's famous military manual. The book gives an account of the Roman military institutions, organization and science, and includes a discussion of naval warfare. Writing under Emperor Theodosius the Great around 400 AD, Vegetius aimed to counter what he perceived as a progressive decay of the Roman military strength. "The printing of this edition is not clean and somewhat rough in general. Exceedingly rare" (cf. Schweiger). Ebert and Schweiger both date this to "between 1474 and 1478". - Annotated throughout in a contemporary hand. The two missing leaves of text have been supplied in different handwriting, no later than the early sixteenth century (watermark of inserted leaves: couronne à diadème, 138 mm high, not identified but similar to Briquet 4900ff., 4950ff., Piccard I.VI, 27-29: various locations, but mainly 1490s to 1520s). Blanks lacking (as from the Bodleian copy); the BSB copy wants the final two leaves (including [d]9, the last leaf of text). Only 19 copies listed in public collections; no sale records for this edition. Provenance: 1) William O'Brien (1832-99), Irish bibliophile and judge who presided over the 1882 "Phoenix Park Murders" (his handwritten pencil acquisition date "6 March 1868" on pastedown); 2) bequeathed as part of his enormous collection, which included 100 incunabula, to Milltown Park Jesuit Library (Dublin) in 1899 (their bookplates, with bequest plate). {BN#48463}
¶ Hain 15911. Goff V-106. GW M49487. Proctor 1126. BSB-Ink V-61. Bod-inc V-050. Grosjean & O'Connell 117. Schweiger II.2, 1121. Ebert 23435.

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A famous tract against Islam

[Alphonsus de Spina. Fortalicium fidei contra iudeos saracenos aliosque christiane fidei... inimicos]. [Lyon], Guillaume Balsarin, 22. V. 1487. [Lyon], Guillaume Balsarin, 22. V. 1487. Small folio (209 x 291 mm). 248 unnumbered leaves (without the first and last blank, as usual). Gothic type, 2 cols., 51 lines. With a woodcut in the text on fol. a2r and printer's device at the end. A single ink initial on p. a2 supplied by the owner. 18th century full calf with panelled boards and giltstamped spine label. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.

EUR 18,000.00

Rare edition; a single copy in Great Britain. The "Fortalitatium fidei", the principal work (written c. 1458) of the baptized Spanish Jew de Spina, is considered the "methodical and ideological foundation of the Inquisition. The book, divided into five chapters, targets chiefly Jews and Muslims" (cf. LMA I, 408f.). Of the five books, "the first [is] directed against those who deny the Divinity of Christ, the second against heretics, the third against the Jews, and the fourth against Islam and the Muslims, while the fifth book treats of the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell. In this last book the author dwells at length upon the demons and their hatred of men; the powers they have over men and the diminution of these powers, owing to the victory of Christ on the Cross, the final condition of the demons, etc." (Catholic Encyclopaedia). "Ouvrage fort curieux de ce théologien espagnol [...] il était dit-on d'origine juive, c'est pour cela que son 'Fortalicium' pèut ètre classé dans une bibliothèque kabbalistique" (Caillet). Part 3, on the iniquities of the Jews, is a veritable encyclopaedia of mediaeval antisemitic libel, containing numbered lists of Jewish "cruelties" and refutations of the Jews' supposed anti-Christian arguments. The section on Islam lists the numerous Saracen wars, while the fifth book is devoted to the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell and its resident demons, whose population the author calculates at over 133 million; this is one of the earliest printed discussions of witchcraft and a precursor to the "Malleus maleficarum", the first edition of which appeared in the same year as this present edition. - Occasional contemporary ink marginalia (some touched by the binder's knife); some slight worming, confined to blank margins. Some even browning and a weak waterstain, but a very good, wide-margined copy with an 18th century noble collection stamp (crowned Gothic letter G; not in Lugt) on the first leaf. {BN#46737}
¶ HC 874*. Goff A-542. GW 1577. Proctor 8575. BMC VIII, 277. Polain 159. Pellechet 564. Coumont (Witchcraft) S84.4. Caillet 10305.

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The whole Luther in contemporary pigskin

Luther, Martin. Der erste (-achte) Theil aller Bücher und Schrifften.... Zum andern mal gedruckt. Jena, Donat Richtzenhayn, Thomas Rebart, Rebarts Erben, Christian Rödingers Erben, 1557-1580. Jena, Donat Richtzenhayn, Thomas Rebart, Rebarts Erben, Christian Rödingers Erben, 1557-1580. Folio. 8 vols. With 8 woodcut title vignettes and 8 woodcuts in the text. Contemp. blindstamped pigskin bindings over wooden boards, some monogrammed and dated, some with preserved clasps.

EUR 15,000.00

Second Jena edition of the collected works (in various impressions for various publishers), edited by Amsdorf, Aurifaber, Rörer, Soltz and others. Each volume begins with a brief introduction and an index (a complete index was separately published by Timotheus Kirchner in 1564). Includes: vol. 1 (Richtzenhayn/Rebart 1564), vol. 2 (ibid. 1563); vol. 3 (Richtzenhayn 1573), vol. 4 (ibid. 1560), vol. 5 (Rödinger's heirs 1557), vol. 6 (Richtzenhayn/Rebart 1568), vol. 7 (Rödinger's heirs 1558), vol. 8 (Rebart's heirs 1580). For the woodcuts monogrammed "PG" in vols. I-VII cf. Nagler (Monogrammisten) IV, 2967, 14. Vol. VIII shows the three Saxon Princes with their coats of arms and a 12-line verse encomium, "Des Luthers Bücher gros und klein". The pretty blindstamped bindings show roll-tools and platestamps, various dates and monogrammes. This set was assembled by the Saxon theologian Dr. Carl Friedrich Bonitz (1775-1835), preacher of the afternoon mass at the Leipzig University Church in 1800, then active in Langensalza from 1802 onwards (and superintendent in 1809). His autograph ownership is on the flyleaf of each volume (dated 1807 in the first). Among Bonitz's works are studies in the Pauline epistles and a "Geschichte der Lutherischen Religions- und Kirchenverbesserung" (1805). - Some browning throughout; occasional slight waterstaining; bindings rubbed. Altogether a well-preserved made-up set from the library of a Saxon protestant theologian of the early 19th century. {BN#30561}
¶ VD 16, ZV 24 1682, L 3355, L 3381, L 3349, L 3330, L 3367 or ZV 21399, L 3336 and L 3389. Aland 572ff. Goedeke II, 151. Cf. BM-STC German 534 (another made-up set).

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Polemical treatise against the Ottomans, printed in 1481

[Turci]. Tractatus quidam de Turcis. Nuremberg, Conrad Zeninger, [after 3 May] 1481. Nuremberg, Conrad Zeninger, [after 3 May] 1481. 4to. 22 ff. (a7, b8, c7: wants first and last blanks). 32 lines, Gothic type. Rubricated throughout, 3 four-line lombardic initials, red penwork decoration at beginning of text. Later cream-coloured calf in contemporary style, with blind rules and stamped cover title "Tractatus De Turcis".

EUR 15,000.00

Third edition of this polemical treatise against the Ottomans. Mainly contains prophecies referring to the Turks (by Merlin, Cyrillus, Joachim of Fiore, St. Hildegarde, Catherine of Siena, Methodius, etc.). Also one of the earliest texts to mention Hungary, and one of the very few works printed by Zeninger: "Conrad Zeninger (from Mainz) produced a mere 10-odd books between 1480 and 1482" (cf. Halle 70). The prophecy referring to the King of Hungary (fol. a[5]r) is reprinted by Fraknói Vilmos, "Schlauch Lörincz szatmári püspöknek Török János által gyüjtött könyvtára", in: Magyar Könyvszemle 2 (1877), p. 77-90, at: 77f. (cf. Apponyi). The date is based on the mention of the death of Mehmet II on fol. A[4]v. - Some browning, with slight waterstain throughout in lower margin; first and final leaf washed. Slight paper flaw in fol. 1 (not touching text); final leaf restored. Faint traces of a later ms. page count are visible near the lower edge. Occasional 16th-century marginalia. A fine copy of this rare work, rubricated throughout. {BN#30245}
¶ HC 15681. Goff T-503. GW M48133. BMC II, 460. BSB-Ink T-437. Oates 1077. Proctor 2229. Walsh I, 794. Pellechet 11154. Halle 70 (Newe Zeitungen), 11. Apponyi 10. Hohenemser 2169. Geldner I, 173.

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A medieval celebration of the "valiant woman" - the first and only incunable edition

Albertus Magnus. Liber de muliere forti […]. [Cologne, Heinrich Quentell, 7 May 1499]. [Cologne, Heinrich Quentell, 7 May 1499]. 4to (135 x 193 mm). (160) ff. (signed aa-dd8; a-y8). With colophonic title-page on verso of y4. Bound in 16th or early 17th century gilt-ruled Spanish calf with gilt ornaments at corners and on spine as well as faded armorial or emblem on center of both boards. All edges stained dark blue. A few scored early inscriptions on title-page including of 'Petri Cendra'; front endpaper laid onto pastedown. Some unobtrusive staining to inner margins throughout due to binder's glue; a few leaves with dampstains to lower corners; and a few signatures foxed due to paperstock. A neat, broad-margined copy in an early binding.

EUR 15,000.00

Editio princeps of this apocryphal text celebrating the Medieval ideal of the 'strong' or 'valiant' woman - certainly an unusual theme for an incunable, and an important reflection of idealized female conduct in the early Renaissance. The present copy is found in a well-preserved binding with ownership inscriptions indicating the book's migration to Spain perhaps as early as the late 16th century. - Long attributed to Albertus Magnus, the present work has enjoyed a recent resurgence in interest thanks to modern scholarship focusing on women in medieval Christianity. De Muliere Forti takes as its scriptural starting point verses 10-31 of Proverbs 31, which contain some of the most outspoken praises of women in the Bible: "Strength and beauty are her clothing… She hath opened her mouth to wisdom, and the law of clemency is on her tongue…" etc. In De Muliere Forti, various parts of a woman's body (feet, hands, arms, loins, breast, womb, etc) are treated as symbolic of the virtues of the 'valiant woman'; overall the text "show[s] readers how a male Dominican thought about gender and, in particular, women in the high Middle Ages" (The Valiant Woman, p. iii). On the other hand, an allegorical interpretation refers to the Church herself as the 'Valiant Woman', and "one could say that [the author] radicalizes the tradition by writing an entire theological treatise on ecclesiology on the basis of the Song [of Solomon]. The opening words of the book state simply: Laudes Ecclesiae describit Salomon in figura mulieris fortis, 'Solomon lists the praises of the Church in the figure of a valiant woman,' and the rest of the work gives a theological elaboration of that assumption, interspersed with philosophy and Aristotelian physics (for example on the formation of snow, in connection with verse 21)" (Wolters). - The title-page inscription of 'Petri Cendra' - a distinctly Catalonian surname - is somewhat puzzling, as it is the name of a famous 13th century (d. 1244) Dominican monk resident in Barcelona. The inscription may reflect a reader's authorial attribution - which would be an interesting piece of the historiographical puzzle - or, a later monk may have taken on the same nom de religion as his illustrious predecessor. - We note just two copies in auction records of the last 20 years, the last (2014) making € 12.500. {BN#50024}
¶ Goff A-286. GW 699. ISTC ia00286000. Cf. also Ashley, Benedict M. & Holtz, Dominic M (eds.), The Valiant Woman. De muliere forti: a medieval commentary on Proverbs 31:10-31 (2013); and Wolters, Albert M. The Song of the Valiant Woman (Prov 31:10-31): A Pattern in the History of Interpretation (MA thesis, McMaster University, 1987).

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An instrument invented by Peurbach

Peurbach, Georg. Quadratum geometricum praeclarissimi mathematici. Nuremberg, Johann Stuchs, 1516. Nuremberg, Johann Stuchs, 1516. Folio. 10 unnumbered ff. Title printed in red and black with full-page woodcut of the instrument in question (repeated on f. 2v) and numerous woodcut diagrams. Modern half morocco over red boards.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition of one of the rarest works by the Austrian astronomer and instrument maker. The "Quadratum geometricum", a new geodetic measuring instrument, was invented by Peurbach himself, and its use is here described for the first time. - From the library of Werner Habel, with his ownership stamp, signature and acquisition date (1977) to front pastedown. Previously in the collections of Count Wladyslaw Hrabia Bielinski and Zygmunt Czarnecki, with their stamps to title. Rare, only a single copy recorded at auction within the last 60 years. {BN#48834}
¶ VD 16, P 2054. Adams P 2270. BNHCat P 943.

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The first important translation (DSB)

[Euclid]. - Proclus Diadochus. In primum Euclidis elementorum librum commentariorum ad universam... mathematicam disciplinam principium eruditionis tradentium libri IV. Padua, Grazioso Percacino, 1560. Padua, Grazioso Percacino, 1560. Folio (215 x 300 mm). (16), 272, (24) pp. With woodcut device on t. p. (Minerva and Mercury holding the wing tips of a rising phoenix), woodcut portrait on reverse, and printer's device on final leaf, as well as numerous mathematical diagrams in the text. Contemp. Italian limp vellum with ms. spine title.

EUR 15,000.00

First Latin edition of one of the major works by Proclus Lycaeus (412-485), founder and head of the neo-Platonic school of Athens: a commentary on the first book of Euclid's "Elements of Geometry", the "oldest mathematical textbook in the world still in common use today" (PMM). Includes the text of the theorems, set within ornamental woodcut framings, and the geometrical diagrams. The editor and translator Francesco Barozzi (1537-1604) taught at the University of Padua. He was later charged with sorcery (in particular, he was said to have caused a torrential rainstorm over his native Crete) and condemned by the Inquisition in 1587. "Barocius' edition of Proclus' commentary on the first book of Euclid's 'Elements' was the first important translation of this work, for it was based on better manuscripts than previous efforts had been. The translation, published in 1560, was completed by Barocius at the age of twenty-two" (DSB). His portrait on the reverse of the title page is cut within a magnificent border. - Old ms. ownership on flyleaf obliterated (probably in the early 19th century); old ownership stamp over title woodcut erased, replaced by a different coat of arms in ink, very likely that of the Italian comital family Antico (insignificant bleeding to reverse). Occasional slight waterstaining, still an exceptionally appealing, clean copy. {BN#34116}
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 33726. Adams P 2138. BM-STC Italian 540. Mortimer 403. Honeyman 2543. DSB I, 468. Brunet IV, 895. Riccardi I/1, 82, 1 ("Bella e rara edizione"). Cf. PMM 25.

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An exhortation to fight the Turks, published in 1497

Locher, Johann Georg. Libro philomusi, Panegyrici ad Rege[m] Tragedia[m] de Thurcis... et Suldano Dyalog[us] de heresiarchis. Strasbourg, Johann (Reinhard) Grüninger, [not before 15 May] 1497. Strasbourg, Johann (Reinhard) Grüninger, [not before 15 May] 1497. 4to. 62 ff. 30-33 lines and heading line (Roman type 17:145G, 22:89G); several woodcut Greek interspersions (K6v & I3r). With full-page woodcut on reverse of title page, additional full-page woodcut on f. Jiv, and 17 half-page woodcuts in the text (with some repeats). Mid-18th-century boards using an 18th-century antiphonary.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition of the author's first important work, an exhortation to fight the Turks, couched as a Latin tragedy. Jakob Locher (1471-1528) had been created poet laureate but months before. The volume is concluded by a "Dyalogus" against all forms of heresy (and including encomia and dedicatory addresses to the Emperor and the nobles of court and clergy). - Contains fine woodcuts, some of which were used previously in the Strasbourg editions of Terence and the Ship of Fools; at least six blocks were cut originally for this book. "The opening woodcut depicts the author and newly crowned poet laureate" (cf. von Arnim). This is the earlier impression without the armorial woodcut on fol. B6r (as in Schramm); the final line of fol. J3r still reads "tekos" (for "telos"). Typographical errors "Jacboi" on fol. L2r; "Daum" (for "Datum") in final line of fol. L3r; colophone reads "anno christo". A pinhead-sized wormhole throughout the blank margin (not touching text). Top edge trimmed rather closely in places; a few underlinings by a contemporary hand. Altogether a fine, very clean copy. Extremely rare; last seen in the trade more than a decade ago (Shipperdson-Field-Nakles copy, Christie's New York, 17 April 2000, lot 22: $15,275). {BN#30236}
¶ HC 10153*. Goff L-264. GW M18631. BMC I, 112. BSB-Ink L-206. Schreiber 4513. Grüninger 32. Schramm XX, 23. Slg. Schäfer 212. Goedeke I, 427, 9.

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With a humanistic manuscript

Pomponius Mela. De situ orbis. Hermolai Barbari fideliter emendatus. [Venice], Giovanni Battista Sessa, 27. X. 1501. [Venice], Giovanni Battista Sessa, 27. X. 1501. 4to. 32 pp. With printer's woodcut device on the title page and different device under the colophon; several woodcut initials. Followed by a 49-page manuscript index (beginning with instructions to the "amice lector" on the verso of the colophon) on 28 blank leaves bound after the printed text. 19th century boards with red morocco spine lettered and decorated in gilt.

EUR 14,500.00

The first edition of the 16th century: a very rare reprint of the incunable published in 1494, the first separate edition to be based on the criticism of the Renaissance scholar Ermolao Barbaro. Dedicated to Pope Alexander VI. Mela's description of the ancient world, based on good sources and written during the reign of Emperor Claudius, is the oldest Roman geography to have survived. This edition was not equipped with an index, but a contemporary humanistic owner rectified the fault by crafting his own: the humanistic "cancelaresca" manuscript provides a list of all cities, places and even subjects mentioned, a total of some 1,000 references to 227 paragraph numbers (which the owner, too, provided in brown ink throughout the inner margins of the book). - Occasional slight foxing and waterstaining to margins near end, but a fine copy of this rare book. {BN#47189}
¶ Edit 16, CNCE 58712. Schweiger II.2, 606. Ebert 13608. Graesse V, 401: "Reimpr. rare de l'edition ... de 1494". Not in Adams, BM-STC Italian, or Riccardi. Not in Brunet or Dibdin.

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Costumes of the world

[Amman, Jost/Weigel, Hans. Habitus praecipuorum populorum, tam virorum quam foeminarum singulari... arte depicti. Trachtenbuch darin fast allerley und der furnembsten Nationen die heutigs tags bekandt sein. Nuremberg, Hans Weigel, 1577]. Nuremberg, Hans Weigel, 1577]. Folio (204 x 325 mm). 161 (instead of 220) hand-numbered woodcut plates in early 18th-century colour, mounted on backing paper and missing parts supplemented by hand. Later half calf with 18th-c. spine label. All edges sprinkled in red.

EUR 14,000.00

First edition of Jost Amman's encyclopedic book of costumes. A strongly fragmented copy, as usual; in the early 19th century, the plates were mounted on backing paper by the owner, the trained landscape painter Jakob Linckh (1786-1841) from Stuttgart (cf. Thieme/B. 23, 254), who also coloured the volume throughout and supplemented all missing parts of the images and even of the text by hand. Linckh, who had studied in Rome, visited Greece in 1810. There he met Byron, who commissioned him to provide the illustrations for Hobhouse's travel book. - Wants 59 plates altogether; the remainder are trimmed closely at the upper edge, and most have severe defects in the lower half. Although the present collection begins with the plate showing the Emperor, as originally issued, the remaining woodcuts follow no apparent order. 20 plates show costumes of Turkey, Arabia, Persia, Egypt, and Ethiopia; others depict Greeks, Russians, and Englishmen. 28 plates show the costumes of today's Italy; German cities are well represented, as are France and Spain, Bohemia and Hungary. Also includes the famous picture of the Brazilian Tupinamba Indians: a man with a crown and belt of feathers, a knife, and a bow and arrow, beside a long-haired woman carrying a baby in a knotted sling. The illustration is an adaptation of two cuts from the "Recueil de la diversité des habits" (Paris, 1562; Antwerp, 1572) by Francois Descerpz, "one of the first likenesses of the Brazilian Indian" (Borba de Moraes). - Title page shows Jakob Linckh's autograph ownership (dated 1825); somewhat later stamped ownership of Anton Franzin (possibly the like-named Tyrolean law clerk, c. 1840) to flyleaf. {BN#28741}
¶ VD 16, W 1487 (BSB copy incomplete). Lipperheide 7-8 (both copies incomplete). Andresen I, 234. Becker 140. Borba de Moraes II, 373f. Maggs, Bibl. Americana 1-214 ("This book is excessively rare in a complete state").

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The first Roman type used in Germany

Dionysius de Burgo Sancti Sepulcri. Commentarium in Valerianum Maximum. [Strasbourg, Adolf Rusch, c. 1471]. [Strasbourg, Adolf Rusch, c. 1471]. Folio (225 x 306 mm). 371 ff. (instead of 372: wants last blank f.; first blank glued to flyleaf). 36-38 lines. Roman type, 1:103R. Contemp. blindstamped half pigskin over wooden boards on three raised double bands with later giltstamped label to spine. Remains of a clasp (with attractively tooled brass boss on back cover).

EUR 14,000.00

Only edition; variant with misprinted incipit ("heremitarnm"). Principal work of the Augustinian Dionysius de Robertis (c. 1280-1342) from Borgo San Sepolcro in Tuscany, Bishop of Monopoli in Lower Italy since 1340. The Humanist was a close friend of the younger poets Boccaccio and Petrarca (he even presented the latter with a ms. of St. Augustine's "Confessions"). "He was the first scholar to interpret classical authors at the University of Naples. Of his works written during this period, the only one to survive is his commentary of the 'Facta et dicta memorabilia' of Valerius Maximus, much appreciated by contemporaries and by posterity (some 30 mss., printed in Strasbourg c. 1470)" (cf. A. Zumkeller, in: LMA III, 1088). An abridged German version of the commentary was published in Augsburg in 1489. The collection of historical anecdotes (mainly from Roman history) was assembled by Valerianus Maximus for purposes of rhetorical training and remained popular throughout the Middle Ages. The present edition is a splendid example of the first Roman type used in Germany, introduced by Rusch in 1467 (cf. LGB² VI, 424). The printer is also referred to as "the R-Printer" or the "printer with the bizarre R"; his identity was revealed only by the research of Karl Dziatzko. - Some browning and brownstaining; slight worming near beginning and end. Not rubricated, but with contemporary ms. chapter headings throughout in the upper margins of recto pages; several marginalia by the same hand. Contemp. (erroneous) pagination is discontinued after fol. 202. A broken corner of the back cover has been replaced. Late Gothic blindstamping to pigskin. Presented to the Marlborough Free Public Library in 1910; formerly in the library of Dr. Hannah E. Bigelow of Marlborough, Massachusetts (cf. bookplates on front pastedown). {BN#22927}
¶ HC 4103* (incorrectly states "369 ff."). Goff D-242. GW 8411. BSB-Ink D 173. BMC I, 63 (IB 629). Pell 3059. Sheppard 224. Proctor 237. Panzer I, 76. Walsh 74-76. Oates 97. Schweiger II, 1114f. ISTC id00242000.

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De arte cabbalistica

[Reuchlin, Johannes]. Colonna Galatino, Pietro. Opus de arcanis catholicae veritatis [...]. Ad haec,... Ioannis Reuchlini de Arte Cabalistica, libri tres. Basel, Johann Herwagen, 1561. Basel, Johann Herwagen, 1561. Folio (230:340 mm). (18) pp., 1 bl. f., 551 (but: 549), (4), 552-651, (41) pp. Attractively blindstamped contemp. pigskin binding over bevelled wooden boards. 2 brass clasps.

EUR 12,500.00

Second issue by Herwagen (printed by him previously in 1550), first published at Ortona in 1518. The author "defends Catholicism against Judaism and also stands up for Reuchlin as regards the assaults of his contemporaries" (cf. Fürst). With many Hebrew passages and quotations. At the end: Reuchlin's "De arte cabbalistica" (not included in the first edition). This famous work on cabbalistic art is written in the form of a discussion between three men: the Jew Simon, the Muslim Marranus, and the Pythagorean Philolaus, who come together for talks at Frankfurt/Main, the residence of the Jew. - Altogether well-preserved. Very rare. {BN#27989}
¶ VD 16, C 4616. Adams C 2420. Benzing 102. Goed. I, 416, 20. Fürst I, 314.

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Leisentrit, Johann. Geistliche Lieder und Psalmen der alten Apostolischer Recht... und wargleubiger Christlicher Kirchen [...]. Bautzen, Johann Wolrab, 1567. Bautzen, Johann Wolrab, 1567. 8vo. 2 pts. in one vol. (12), CCCXLIX [instead of CCCLV: wants 6 ff., D1-3, 6-8], (13) ff. (8), LVXXII [but: LXXIII, instead of LXXVI; wants 3 ff.], 1 f. [instead of 8: wants 7 ff.]. Both titles printed in red and black. With various stipple-engraved borders throughout, numerous half-page woodcuts and musical notes in the text. Contemp. blindstamped over wooden boards with bevelled edges. Two functional clasps.

EUR 12,500.00

First edition of both parts of this finest hymnal of the 16th century, beautifully illustrated and with ornamental borders and letterpress musical notes. Of the utmost rarity: no copy at German auctions since 1950 (only two copies of the 1573 second edition sold). This first-ever illustrated catholic hymnal, edited by the Dean of the Bautzen Cathedral, Johann Leisentrit (1527-86) from Olmütz, marks the beginning of the catholic song book proper. - Uncommonly well-preserved blind-tooled binding showing a roll-tooled Bible frieze. Front endpaper has contemp. ms. ownership of Caspar Obermayr (dated 1582 - possibly the theologian of that name known to have served the Pinzgau parish of St. Georgen in 1606?). Evenly browned throughout due to paper. Wants a total of 16 ff. (all subpplied in facsimile): in part I, leaves D1-3, 6-8; in part II, leaves L 2-8; M 1-3. Of the ten copies traced in libraries and collections via VD16 and KVK, only one is verifiably complete (Halle); most lack the second part altogether. {BN#32007}
¶ BM-STC German 492. VD 16, L 1061. BNHCat L 145.

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