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The birth of modern anatomy: a coloured copy of the first edition, used by the surgeon of the Duke of Saxony

Vesalius, Andreas. De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Basel, (Johannes Oporinus, June 1543). Folio (319 x 456 mm). 355 leaves and two folding sheets. Roman and italic types, occasional use of Greek and Hebrew types, printed shoulder notes. Woodcut pictorial title, author portrait, and printer’s device; 7 large, 186 mid-sized, and 22 small woodcut initials; more than 200 woodcut illustrations, including 3 full-page skeletons, 14 full-page muscle men, 5 large diagrams of veins and nerves, 10 mid-sized views of the abdomen, 2 mid-sized views of the thorax, 13 mid-sized views of the skull and brain, and numerous smaller views of bones, organs and anatomical parts. All woodcuts and initials up to page 165 in full contemporary hand colour. Contemporary blindstamped leather over wooden boards with bevelled edges, on five raised double bands, with two clasps. In custom-made solander box.

EUR 950,000.00

A truly outstanding copy of one of the greatest and most appealing books in the history of science. Preserved in its original binding with the blindstamped initials of its first owner, the German physician Caspar Neefe (1514-79), and with his handwritten annotations throughout, the present copy is partly coloured by a contemporary artist (including the iconic woodcut used as title page and all anatomical illustrations up to page 165). Caspar Neefe, who later served as personal physician to Duke Albert I of Saxony, acquired the precious volume only a year after its publication and obviously consulted it extensively throughout his career as a medical practitioner. - With the publication of "De humani corporis fabrica" (when he was only twenty-eight) Vesalius revolutionized both the science of anatomy and how it was taught. In his preface he describes his disappointing experiences as a student in Paris and Louvain, stating his intention to reform the teaching of anatomy by giving in this book a complete description of the structure of the human body, thereby drawing attention "to the falsity of Galen’s pronouncements". Vesalius also broke with tradition by performing dissections himself instead of leaving this task to assistants: the striking and dramatic title illustration shows him conducting such a dissection, his hand plunged into a female cadaver (striking in itself, as only the cadavers of executed criminals could be dissected legally and female criminals were rarely executed), surrounded by a seething mass of students. - The "Fabrica" is also revolutionary for "its unprecedented blending of scientific exposition, art and typography" (Norman). The woodcuts by artists of the school of Titian are both iconographically and artistically important. The series of fourteen muscle men show landscapes that, when assembled in reverse order, form a panorama of the Euganean Hills near Padua, a scenery well known to Vesalius while he was at work on the Fabrica. - Of the few copies of the first edition to have come to the market in recent decades, only two were in a contemporary binding. Apart from Vesalius's dedication copy to Emperor Charles V (Christie's New York, 18 March 1998, lot 213: $1,652,500), only a single other partly coloured copy was previously known, a list to which ours must now be added as the third known copy in contemporary colour. - Acquired in 2017; previously in a Tyrolean private medical collection, where the book rested for three generations (erased circular library stamp in the blank lower margin of the title page): an outstanding copy hitherto unknown to scholarship (cf. the recent census published by Dániel Margócsy, University of Cambridge, below; further relevant correpondence with Dr Margócsy is available upon request). Occasional waterstaining to margins, the splendid binding a little rubbed and bumped, but altogether a wonderfully crisp, wide-margined copy of the first edition. Unquestionably the most desirable copy of a milestone in the history of science still in private hands, and likely the most important medical book obtainable for decades to come. {BN#47733}
¶ PMM 71. VD 16, V 910. Durling 4577. Cushing VI.A.1. Eimas 281. Norman 2137. Wellcome 6560. Graesse VI.2, 289. Cf. D. Margócsy, M. Somos, S. N. Joffe: "Vesalius' Fabrica: A Report on the Worldwide Census of the 1543 and 1555 Editions", in: Social History of Medicine Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 201–223. For Neefe cf. A. Lesser, Die albertinischen Leibärzte (Petersberg 2015), p. 71-74.

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The Hammer of Witches - editio princeps

Institoris, Heinrich. Malleus maleficarum. [Speyer, Peter Drach, before April 1487]. [Speyer, Peter Drach, before April 1487]. Folio (215 x 294 mm). 129 ff. (wants final blank). 48 lines, double-columned, gothic type. Rubricated, with lombardic initials in red and blue, occasional pen flourishes, paragraph marks at beginning of chapter headings, some capital strokes. 19th-c. white paper boards with printed paper spine label. Stored in custom-made full green morocco gilt clamshell box.

EUR 175,000.00

First edition of the notorious "Hammer of Witches", which laid down procedures for finding out and convicting witches. Due to the innovation of the printing press, it contributed significantly to the early modern witch craze. "The most important and most sinister work on demonology ever written. It crystallized into a fiercely stringent code previous folklore about black magic with church dogma on heresy, and, if any one work could, opened the floodgates of the inquisitorial hysteria [... it was] the source, inspiration, and quarry for all subsequent treatises on witchcraft" (Robbins, Encyclopaedia of Witchcraft and Demonology). The book was published and republished in at least 13 editions up to 1520, then revived from the late 16th century, undergoing at least 16 editions between 1574 and 1669, as well as numerous editons in German, French and English. Complete copies of the first edition are rare, and only a few copies are found in American institutions. - Upper cover stained and soiled, first three pages of text with some soiling and staining, neat repair to final printed leaf. All in all, a remarkably fine, clean copy from the famous Donaueschingen library of the princes of Fürstenberg with their printed spine title and shelfmark "298" on the spine label (repeated in pencil on recto of f. 1). {BN#34028}
¶ HC* 9238. Goff I-163. British Library IB.8581 (acquired in 1867 but not recorded in BMC). ISTC ii00163000. Coumont I4.2. Danet 16. Graesse III, 425.

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The first systematic study to address exclusively the education of women: a fabled rarity, the original first edition

Vives, Juan Luis. De institutione foeminae [...] libri tres, mira eruditione,... elegantia, brevitate, facilitate, plane aurei, pietateq[ue] & sanctimonia, vere Christiani, Christianae in primis Virgini, deinde maritae, postremo viduae, novo instituendi argumento longe utilissimi. Quid autem singuli libri toto opere contineant, sequenti pagella, videre est. (Antwerp, Michiel Hillen van Hoochstraten for Franz Birckmann, 1524). (Antwerp, Michiel Hillen van Hoochstraten for Franz Birckmann, 1524). 4to (140 x 195 mm). (96) ff., numbered in an early hand (omitting f. 77). Elaborate woodcut border on title-page, featuring elephant and cherubim, and with several large woodcut initials in text. Bound in early limp vellum with manuscript title on spine; edges stained red. 17th century portrait of Vives added to inner cover. Lengthy, exegetical early annotations to the first book 'De Instituenda Virgine' along with readership markings. A very good copy from the Harrach Library (Austria/Madrid), with 19th century stamp on title.

EUR 125,000.00

Very rare first edition of "the first systematic study to address explicitly and exclusively the universal education of women", commissioned by Henry VIII's wife, Catherine of Aragon, who was at the time rearing her own daughter, Mary Tudor. Translated and adapted by numerous followers, Vives' treatise would go on to be read in almost every European vernacular, often by women themselves. The first edition, however, is rare in census and in commerce - and contains passages, particularly on chastity and intellectual capacity, which were entirely re-written in later incarnations. A fundamental document for the role of women in Early Modern society - and particularly in Early Modern England - this copy is especially remarkable for its state of preservation. An early reader of Vives has here added his own comments to the chapters on the seclusion of maidens and examples of feminine virtue. - "De Institutione Foeminae Christianae" consists of 3 books, one for each stage of woman's life: maidenhood, marriage, and widowhood. In his preface to Queen Catherine, Vives quotes Aristotle to the effect that states which do not provide for the education of women deprive themselves of a great source of their prosperity; yet as Charles Fantazzi points out, Vives is in fact here caught in a delicate double bind, "insistent on a subordinate, submissive role for women, the text must take care to expound its message not only without alienating the queen but rather, indeed, with the goal of winning her favour." Despite its dedication and although Vives specifically adapts his prose style for a female readership, the treatise is hardly pro-woman: "the 'Education' is determined to be both a reference book for men on how to control their women, as well as an edifying treatise for women to absorb as a source of proper behaviour" (Kolsky). Nevertheless, Vives' praise of women's intellectual capacity and his advocation of some form of universal learning for females are viewed as landmarks for modern historians of women and gender. - According to Fantazzi, "'De Institutione' enjoyed an enormous popularity and was generally regarded as the most authoritative statement on this subject throughout the sixteenth century, especially in England, where it found favor with Catholics and Protestants alike. There can be no denying that merely by attaching such importance to the education of women, Vives laid the groundwork for the Elizabethan age of the cultured woman." It was rapidly translated into English, enjoying some nine editions in that language during the 16th century alone (cf. Higginbotham, p. 69). According to Pollie Bromilow, the dozens of vernacular translations were partly aimed at women themselves, who had no knowledge of Latin; and thus a large segment of its readership during the 16th century was in fact female. Appearing in an undated edition as early as 1528 or 1529, the English translation is rather an adaptation of Vives' text begun by Thomas More but completed by his household tutor, William Hyrde, who must have used the present edition in its preparation. - In 1538 Vives brought out a revised Latin edition reflecting many changes to the original text. This is the edition most commonly cited by scholars, probably thanks to its greater availability. The sections on maidens and the preservation of maidenhood (in all its meanings), however, were substantially re-written - notably, treating many of the same subjects which interested the annotator of the present copy! Chapter 6, on virginity, for example, "was subjected to a complete revision, so that it bears little resemblance to the first published version. It is obvious that Vives struggled over the proper approach to this topic. In the original version, he suddenly abandons his more discursive style for a rather personal and, one might add, paternalistic tête-á-tête with a young woman" (Fantazzi, p. 18). Vives' views on women's intellectual capacities also develop between the two editions. - At the outbreak of the Reformation Vives was a close friend of Erasmus, who had commissioned him to write a commentary on Augustine's "City of God" in 1521. Perhaps seeking refuge from the political and religious turmoil of Europe, Vives turned his attention to England from this point onward. He dedicated his edition of "De Civitate Dei" to Henry VIII in 1522, and already in May of 1523 was able to present a manuscript of his "De Institutione Foeminae Christianae" to Queen Catherine in person. At Henry's court he grew close to the circle of Thomas More and produced a further educational treatise, "De Ratione Studii Puerilis". Thanks to his growing opposition to Henry VIII's divorce proceedings, however, Vives was placed under house arrest by Cardinal Wolsley from February to April 1528, and upon his release sensibly fled the country - only to return briefly later that year in the role of Catherine's legal adviser. - Provenance: later stamp of the Harrach Library on title-page. The collection originated as the personal library of Graf Ferdinand Bonaventura von Harrach, Austrian envoy to Spain (1637-1707), and explains the characteristically Spanish binding on the present example. Ferdinand's son Aloys followed in his father's footsteps; but after his death in 1742 the collection was transferred back to the remaining Harrach family in Vienna. Finally, the collection wound up in the family castle 'Schloss Bruck an der Leitha', in Lower Austria. We have handled numerous other Harrach copies, which seem to have formed a cohesive 'personal reference library' of 16th and 17th century works for this seventeenth century statesman. - A very good copy. OCLC shows just four copies in American institutions: Harvard, the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies, Yale, and the Huntington. {BN#45727}
¶ Nijhoff/Kronenberg 2167. Adams V 951. Brunet V, 1333. Estelrich 136. Cf. also Fantazzi's introduction to a modern translation, The Education of a Christian Woman: A Sixteenth-Century Manual (U Chicago, 2007). Kolsky, Making Examples of Women: Juan Luis Vives' The Education of a Christian Woman. Higginbotham, The Girlhood of Shakespeare's Sisters: Gender, Transgression, Adolescence (U Edinburgh, 2013). Bromilow, "An Emerging Female Readership of Print in Sixteenth-Century France?", French Studies (2013) Vol. 67, pp. 155-169.

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A Complicated Incunable for a Bohemian Witch-Hunter

Institoris, Heinrich (Heinrich Kramer). Sancte Roma[n]e eccl[esi]e fidei defe[n]sio[n]is p[ro]pungnaculu[m] [!] Adversus... walde[n]sium seu Pickardorum heresim Certas germanie Bohemieq[ue] naciones in odium cleri ac enervacione[m] ecclesiastice potestatis virnlenta [!] co[n]tagio[n]e sparsi[m] inficientis [...]. Olmütz, Conrad Baumgarten, 20. IV. 1501. Olmütz, Conrad Baumgarten, 20. IV. 1501. Folio (220 x 315 mm). 128 ff. (a-b8, c-d6, e4, f6, g4, h-p6, q4, r-x6, y4; page count: [t.p.], iii, v, iiii, v-ix, v, xiii, xii, [2 ff.], xiiii, xvi-xliii, xlvii, xlv-cvii, cix-cxxviii), complete thus. With half-page title woodcut, full-page woodcut on verso, large woodcut initial, and printer's device at the end (all with contemporary touches of red ink), as well as numerous fleuronee and lombardic initials in red and green, including five figurated initials. Rubricated throughout. Contemp. blindstamped gothic binding: dark brown calf over wooden boards, remains of engraved brass clasps.

EUR 85,000.00

First edition of this polemic against the Bohemian Brethren, written by the author of the notorious "Malleus Maleficarum": a "Bulwark of Faith of the Holy Roman Church Against the Heresy of the Waldensians and Picards". Extremely rare: the present copy represents the hitherto unknown first impression of the first edition, still bearing a slightly different title; all other known copies printed that same year (three via OCLC, one in the Scientific Library of Olomouc, one in the Bavarian State Library), as well as the 1502 second edition, are entitled "Sancte Romane ecclesie fidei defensionis clippeum adversus waldensium seu pickardorum heresim, certas Germanie Bohemieque nationes in odium cleri ac enervatioe ecclesiatice potestatis virulenta contagione sparsim inficientes" (changing the - misspelled - "bulwark" into a "shield"). Quire signatures and pagination depart from those stated by OCLC in several details. In particular, the head-over-heels "u" in "virulenta" (here printed as "virnlenta", corrected in other editions), identifies the present variant as the earliest one. - In the year 1500, 15 years after he first published his "Malleus Maleficarum", Institoris had been installed by Pope Alexander VI as inquisitor to Bohemia and Moravia, where he was to take action agains heretics, sorcerers, and witches (cf. Tschacher). In the present work, his last to see publication, "he once more invokes his 'Malleus' and his earlier sermons against witchery and its doubters. The Bohemian Waldenses, he argues, had not only perpetrated numerous heresies, but also questioned the legitimacy of the witch trials. It is telling that Kramer, in his final polemic, would interpret the heresies of the Waldenses and witches as conjoined harbingers of the approaching apocalypse" (ibid.). The inquisitor who prided himself on having sent no fewer than 200 witches to the stake discusses other heresies as well: fol. 86ff. contains an entire chapter "De origine legis machometice". - One of the most extensive and technically ambitious works to leave the press of the itinerant German printer Konrad Baumgarten, active in Danzig, Olomouc, Breslau, and Frankfurt/Oder between 1498 and 1509. The page count is exceedingly confused, as in all copies. Indeed, only a single leaf in the entire "a" gathering bears a signature: the second, counted as "a iii" in error; thus agreeing with all copies available for comparison. The count of the first four leaves in our copy has therefore been corrected to "a i-iv" in red ink by a contemporary hand. - From the library of the disputatious Bohemian Franciscan friar John Aquensis, who in 1502 was to publish his own polemic against the "Picards", with his marginalia and his autograph ownership on the title page. "Although Johannes Aquensis, Jan Vodnansky in Czech, was one of the most active Catholic writers at the turn of the Middle Ages to the Age of Reformation, he has been largely ignored by scholarship so far. Born in Vodhany (some 30 kilometers to the north-west of Budweis and considered Utraquist) around 1460, he attended the school of St. Henry's in Prague since 1473, later studying Divinity at the University there. After obtaining his Bachelor's degree in 1480, he joined the Observant Franciscans and soon became one of the most vocal antagonists of the Utraquists, Begards, Waldensians, Bohemian Brethren, and other heretics. He disappears after 1534 [...] Most of his works, almost entirely ignored by scholarship but apparently marked by a curious mixture of erudition, bellicose dialectics, vivid imagination, and credulity, are known in manuscripts only; a very few were printed, and some must be presumed lost or awaiting discovery" (cf. Dietrich Kurze, Märkische Waldenser und Böhmische Brüder. Zur brandenburgischen Ketzergeschichte und ihrer Nachwirkung im 15. und 16. Jh., in: H. Beumann [ed.], Festschrift für Walter Schlesinger II [Cologne 1974], p. 456-502, at: 480). Some staining to first and last leaf; occasional insignificant waterstaining, otherwise very clean, showing very little browning. Altogether an excellent copy in its contemporary, original binding. The individual blindstamps could not be traced in the Kyriss or Schunke collections; the clasp hitches are engraved with an invocation of the Virgin ("MARIA AVE"). Text carefully rubricated throughout; the inhabited initials depict dragons and other mythical creatures, as well as the bearded head of an old man. - Of the utmost rarity: this present first edition is not listed in German or international auction records. The last copy of any edition in the trade was that formerly in the Broxbourne collection (1502 second ed.: Sotheby's, 8 May 1978, lot 408, to Breslauer). {BN#30213}
¶ Not in VD 16 or ISTC. Cf. Panzer VII, 486, 1. Cf. OCLC 22369397. Zibrt III, 5181. Isaac 14475. Werner Tschacher, "Kramer, Heinrich (Henricus Institoris)", in: Lex. zur Geschichte der Hexenverfolgung, ed. G. Gersmann, K. Moeller & J.-M. Schmidt, s.v.

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First illustrated edition of the only architectural treatise to survive from classical antiquity

Vitruvius Pollio, Marcus. [De architectura libri decem]. (Venice, Giovanni Tacuino, 22 May 1511). (Venice, Giovanni Tacuino, 22 May 1511). Folio (232 x 323 mm). (4), 110, (9) ff., final blank. Four-piece woodcut title-border with dolphins and 136 woodcut illustrations and diagrams most within a double frame. Outline initials within a double frame; woodcut orb and cross device on final page. Modern full vellum.

EUR 75,000.00

The first illustrated edition of the only architectural treatise to survive from classical antiquity, considered the supreme authority by Italian Renaissance architects: the single most influential work for the later development of European architecture. The previous three editions contain diagrams only, making this the first to include non-schematic illustrations. The woodcuts depict ornaments, plans, elevations, proportions of the human body, heating systems, machinery, a ship with an odometer and siege machines, among other subjects. The title border with dolphins is itself "one of the most influential pieces of ornamentation of the sixteenth century" (Mortimer). The 1511 edition is also the first to be edited by Fra Giovanni Giocondo (1433-1515), a working architect, as well as an editor for the Aldine Press and an authority on classical inscriptions. During the last year of his life he collaborated with Raphael and Sangallo on St. Peter's Basilica after Bramante's death in 1514. - Title page remargined along gutter and fore-edge (no loss to text, but possibly supplied from another copy); some browning and faint waterstaining. Leaves G8 and K1 torn and repaired, B1-8 bound out of sequence. Still a good copy of a rare and important edition. {BN#46765}
¶ Adams V 902. Fowler 393. Kat. der Ornamentstichslg. Berlin 1798. Sander 7694. Millard Italian 156. Mortimer Italian 543. Essling 1702. Norman 2157. Sander 7694. Cicognara 696. RIBA 3491. Cf. PMM 26.

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A milestone of science, from the library of the Nuremberg humanist Joachim Camerarius

Agricola, Georg. De re metallica. Basel, J. Froben and N. Episcopius, 1556. Basel, J. Froben and N. Episcopius, 1556. Folio. (10), 538 (but: 502), (74) pp. With 2 (1 folded) woodcut plates and about 280 woodcut illustrations and diagrams in text, partly full-page. Contemporary vellum with ms. title to spine. Edges in blue.

EUR 65,000.00

First edition of "the first systematic treatise on mining and metallurgy, and one of the first technological works of modern times" (PMM), an immaculate copy with outstanding provenance. Dealing with "everything connected with the mining industry and metallurgical processes, including administration, prospecting, the duties of officials and companies, and the manufacture of glass, sulphur and alum" (PMM), Agricola's main work paved the way for further systematic study of the earth and of its rocks, minerals, fossils, refinery and oil. Illustrated with 2 plates (one folding) and more than 280 woodcuts in the text attributed to Hans Rudolf Manuel Deutsch (1525-72), some very large, showing the different stages of the extraction and transformation of metals. - From the library of the famous German physician and botanist Joachim Camerarius the Younger (1534-98) with his autograph ownership to the title page ("Joachimo Joach[imi] F[ilio] Camerario"; the Morgan Library holds another book from his library with an identical inscription, cf. Accession no. PML 129904) and a very few underlinings and marginalia most likely also in his hand. Unidentified 18th c. engraved bookplate with the motto "simulare nescit" on verso of title. Acquired from the library of Werner Habel, with his stamp, signature and acquisition date (1977) to front pastedown. First and final pages very lightly brownstained in the edges, otherwise clean and crisp throughout. Complete with the two inserted plates following page 100. A very appealing, wide-margined copy in its first binding. {BN#48845}
¶ PMM 79. Adams A 349. Sparrow (Milestones of Science), 4 and pl. 26.

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Medical sammelband, including the first edition of his "Apothekerordnung"

Brunfels, Otto. Reformation der Apotecken, welche inhaltet vil guter stück,... die eynem yeglichen fast nützlich sein [...]. Von edlen steynen, wie die zuken[n]en [...] Wie man Syrupen, Latwergen, und Confect machen soll, verteütscht auß dem Latein durch D. Hansen Eles. Strasbourg, Wendelin Rihel d. Ä., 1536. Strasbourg, Wendelin Rihel d. Ä., 1536. 4to. (4), LIV pp. With title woodcut and several woodcut initials. (Bound after) II: Ryff, Walther Hermann. Ein wolgegründet, nutzlich und heilsam handtbüchlin, gmeyner Practick der gantzen leib artzney [...]. (Strasbourg, Balthasar Beck), 1541. 4 parts. (224) ff. (last blank), (140), XC, (12) ff. (last blank). With 21 woodcuts in the text. Contemporary full pigskin over wooden boards with bevelled edges, blindstamped with evangelists' roll. 2 clasps.

EUR 58,000.00

I: Very rare first edition of this book on the equipping and the managing of pharmacies. A single copy in auction records (2011, Reiss, sale 142: 40,000 Euros, also bound in a medical sammelband). The pretty woodcut on the title page shows the interior of a pharmacy, with one apothecary taking over a client's recipe, another fetching a can from a shelf, and a third at work with mortar and pestle. - The humanist, physician and theologian Brunfels (1490-1534), "first in time and importance among the German botanists of the 16th century" (Garrison/Morton 279), turned to Lutheranism in 1521, after which he had to flee; Ulrich von Hutten found him a parish near Frankfurt. Later, Brunfels turned to Basel, where he earned an M.D. degree, and Strasbourg, where he published several works on pharmacy and paediatrics. - Slight brownstaining and waterstaining; a few occasional edge flaws. The lower margin of fol. 30 contains an extensive, roughly contemporary note on camphor: "Der recht natürlich campher wirdt also probiert: Nimm ein new backen brot als bald es auß dem ofen kommen ist, schneids mitten entzwei, leg den campher darein: so er wässerecht wirdt, ist er rechtschaffen, so er aber dierr und trucken bleibt ist er gemacht, sol wol bewart werden verschwinden liederlich, man soll in behalten in aine marmelsteinen oder Alabastunen geschirr, darzu gethan leinsamen [...]". - II: First edition of this copious medical manual. The woodcuts show babies in the womb, two Phlebotomy Men, the blood vessels of the head (used twice), and two different diagrams of the eye (one a cross-section such as it would be used three decades later in Alhazen's "Opticae Thesaurus"). Leonhard Fuchs would challenge the publication as an adaptation of his own "De medendis singularum humani corporis partium libri IV". - Old handwritten ownership on title page deleted; some browning and waterstaining. Slight worming to front endpapers; endpapers at rear have additional recipes in a contemporary hand. The pretty binding shows slight worming, otherwise well preserved. {BN#47865}
¶ I: VD 16, B 8567. Durling 730. IA 125.663. Muller 394, 6. Adlung/Urdang 83f. - II: VD 16, R 4007-4008. Benzing 115. Muller II, 312, 94. Ritter (Rép.) 2035. Waller 8350. Not in Bird, Durling, Lesky, Osler, Ritter (Cat.), STC, Wellcome etc.

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With the painted arms of Pope Innocent VIII, heightened in gilt

Innocentius IV, Pope (Andreas Hartmann, ed.). Apparatus super libros decretalium. Strasbourg, [Heinrich Eggestein], 1478. Strasbourg, [Heinrich Eggestein], 1478. Folio (308 x 430 mm). (408) ff. (first and last leaf blank), bound without Baldus de Ubaldis's "Repertorium super Innocentio" and the following leaf containing table of contents. Gothic letter in double columns, large initials at the beginning of each book supplied in red and blue with penwork flourishing, smaller initials supplied alternately in red and blue, headline supplied in red and blue. Three coats of arms finely painted at foot of first page by a contemporary hand. Contemporary pigskin-backed wooden boards (clasps and catches missing), title in handsome gothic lettering along lower edge.

EUR 50,000.00

First edition of the commentary of Innocent IV on the Decretals of Gregory IX (known as the Liber Extra), one of the most important collections of medieval canon law. A handsome copy in a contemporary binding. Innocent's commentary was completed ca. 1251 and was never superseded. Beautifully printed by Heinrich Eggestein of Strasbourg; "le plus beau livre que cet imprimeur ait produit" (fin-de-siècle catalogue note pasted to first blank). Like a handful of other copies, the present copy contains the Apparatus only and was bound without Baldus de Ubaldis's "Repertorium super Innocentio" (an index to Innocent's work) which, although a separate work, seems intended to have formed part of the edition. - Several contemporary annotations, manicules and other markings; summary of contents supplied in upper outer corners of recto of each leaf in a contemporary hand. Binding insignificantly rubbed; professional remarginings to first blank leaf. Occasional light browning, some light dampstaining, a few small wormholes at beginning and end of volume, occasionally affecting a letter or two. Generally a very fresh, wide-margined and crisp copy (hailed in the catalogue note as "superbe exemplaire dans toutes ses marges, parfaitement propre et d'une fraîcheur étonnante, sans le moindre défaut"). - Provenance: 1) painted at the foot of the first page by an accomplished contemporary (German?) artist are the arms of Pope Innocent VIII (1484-92), flanked by two coats of arms, one resembling a printer's device, possibly signifying an intended gift by an unidentified German scholar to the Pope in the 1480s or early 1490s. 2) Late 16th century ownership of Konrad Fuchs von Ebenhofen zu Saldenburg, a Tyrolean nobleman who acquired the Bavarian demesne of Saldenburg in 1587 and died on 14 January 1614 (his inscription "Conradt Fuchs" under the arms and "Fuchs zu Saldenburg" on front pastedown). 3) Owned by the Marquis de Villoutreys in the later 19th century (bookplate of the Bibliothèque Du Plessis-Villoutreys on pastedown). The Villoutreys family occupied the castle of Bas-Plessis in Chaudron-en-Mauges (Maine-et-Loire) from 1666. The castle was largely destroyed by fire in 1794 during the French Revolution; the central neoclassical section was erected in 1845, and a wing added in 1875 to house the Marquis’s library. When restoration began in 1982, the castle’s library was transferred to the Université Catholique de l'Ouest, and then to the Bibliothéque des Archives Départementales du Maine-et-Loire. The present incunable left the Villoutreys' library for an unidentified private collection at some time prior to this transfer. 4) British private collection. {BN#50097}
¶ HC *9191. Goff I-95. GW M12156. BMC I, 69 ("the contents of each leaf are shortly noted at the top"). Sheppard 205. Proctor 267. Bod-inc I-013. BSB I-176.

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Illuminated with two miniatures

[Biblia latina]. Biblia latina. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 14. VI. 1478. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 14. VI. 1478. Large folio (280 x 360 mm). Including Menardus monachus. (1), CCCCLXI, (6) ff., with two coloured historiated initials. 16th century blindstamped pigskin binding over wooden boards, wants clasps.

EUR 48,000.00

Koberger's third Latin Bible, printed with the same types as the second: in the splendic Gothic typeface which Koberger used exclusively for his Bibles; at the same time, the earliest type he is known to have used (cf. Klemm, Bibliogr. Mus., 722). The initial on fol. i shows the evangelist Mark with the lion; the tendril decoration reaches from the upper edge (slightly trimmed) to the lower one, ending in a coat of arms bearing the monogram "S-A-B". The second historiated initial on fol. iiii shows the Fall from Grace (Adam and Eve in paradise, with the apple tree and the serpent in the centre); here, the tendrils reach as far as the lower third of the page and also end in a coat of arms. Very exactingly rubricated throughout; signed at the end: "91 Jo fec". Several handwritten ownerships to fol. A1r, some contemporary, others as late as 1876: the name and printed bookplate of "C. R. Earley, Ridgway, Pa." (1823-98). Several manuscript marginalia. Some slight browning to the gutter of the first few leaves, staining to upper edge of fol. i. Insignificant waterstaining to upper edge of several leaves; occasional foxing or tiny smudged inkstains. Handwritten marginalia trimmed in places, but altogether a crisp, wide-margined copy. Some staining to the hefty binding; edges as well as a crack to the upper cover have been unobtrusively repaired. {BN#47450}
¶ Hain 3068. Goff B-556. GW 4232. BMC II, 415. Polain 648. Pellechet 2296. Oates 988. Hase 27.

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Presentation copy of an early work on musical theory, no copy recorded at auction

Quercu, Simon de. Opusculum musices perquam brevissimum. Vienna, Johann Winterburger, 1509. Vienna, Johann Winterburger, 1509. 4to. 48 unnumbered pages. With the Guidonian hand woodcut in red and black, 4 woodcut initials, woodcut device at end, several xylographic tables and music examples. Modern white boards with title lettered on spine.

EUR 48,000.00

Rare first edition, of which just a few copies survive: the author's presentation copy, a partly erased inscription at the end reading "Munus Autoris [...] An 11, 7 martii [...]". Quercu was choirmaster to Duke Ludovico Sforza of Milan and accompanied his two sons as a tutor to the court of Vienna. The present treatise, a famous and highly original book on musical theory for young scholars, was probably used in the musical education of the duke's sons. "The first part, 'Musica plana', deals with the modes, intervals, note names, solmization and solmization syllables, and mutation. The second part, 'Musica mensuralis', deals with note lengths, rests, ligatures, mensuration signs, alteration, imperfection and mensural proportions. The third part, 'Contrapunctus', considers consonances, dissonances and polyphonic writing. His teaching is illustrated with many music examples" (New Grove). The finely printed book includes on p. (4) the Guidonian hand, named after Guido of Arezzo (992?-1050), who introduced into music theory this mnemonic device to help teach singers learn to sight-read. Each portion of the hand represents a specific note in the hexachord system; during instruction, a teacher would indicate the series of notes by pointing to them on their hand to have the students sing them. - Light washing traces. Inscription recording "A gift from the author, 7 March [15]11", on the final page. German dealer’s catalogue clipping bound in before title. A monogram stamp on the lower pastedown identifies the collection of Otto Schäfer in Schweinfurt (purchased in 1958). No auction record for this edition (and only one for the second edition; cf. ABPC/RBH). USTC lists 5 copies only held in libraries including this copy. {BN#48444}
¶ VD 16, Q 39. Denis p. 22. Panzer IX, p. 3, no. 13. New Grove XV, 504. MGG X, 1811. USTC 679907.

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Rarer Than Vesalius - No Copy Recorded at Auction

Tagault, Jean. De chirurgica institutione libri quinque. His accessit sextus... liber de materia chirurgica, authore Jacobo Hollerio Stempano [...]. Paris, Christian Wechel, 1543. Paris, Christian Wechel, 1543. Folio (210 x 294 mm). (48), 421 pp., 1 leaf of errata, plus 2-leaf illustrated insert after p. 354 as called for. With 10 full-page woodcuts in text. Bound in contemporary vellum with endpapers skillfully renewed. Stored in custom-made half calf clamshell box.

EUR 45,000.00

Rare first edition, and the only folio printing, of the author's chef d'oeuvre, published in the same year as "De corporis humani fabrica", the similarly grand production of his most famous pupil, Andreas Vesalius. Although lesser-known as a text than his student's groundbreaking masterpiece, Tagault's "De chirurgica institutione" provides an essential piece of the puzzle in understanding the context in which Vesalius came to break new ground. The book's publishing history uncannily mirrors that of "De fabrica", and several of its anatomical diagrams were in fact plagiarized from the "Tabulae sex" through a chain of events yet to be elucidated. - Although he cannot be held in the same light as his eminent pupil, Tagault was an important figure on the cusp of the Vesalian revolution. O'Malley calls him "one of the few members of the faculty actively interested in anatomical studies" (p. 425) and notes that he was performing public dissections as early as 1535, during the period in which Vesalius studied under him (cf. p. 58). O'Malley also notes a story to the effect that the anatomist Jacobus Sylvius - a successful instructor at the University of Paris, but also terribly jealous of Vesalius's rising star - was responsible for advising Tagault on stylistic changes to improve the presentation of his "De chirurgica institutione". - The five books of Tagault's treatise elaborate the writings of Guy de Chauliac (1300-68) on the surgical aspects of tumors, wounds, hernias, ulcers, fractures, and dislocations. 2 full-page woodcut figures ultimately based on Gersdorff show the wound-man and the extraction of an arrow on the battlefield; a further three, in fact plagiarized from the "Tabulae sex", are found on the two leaves inserted at p. 354 following Tagault's treatise, accompanied by numbered legends in Latin and Greek. The precise circumstances surrounding their appearance in this work are intriguing; their position suggests a late addition, perhaps in a nod to the growing popularity of his former student. According to Cushing, the four chief suspects in the transfer of the woodcuts are the anatomist Louis Vassé, the printers Charles Estienne and Christian Wechel, and Tagault himself. Moritz Roth (Andreas Vesalius Bruxellensis, 1892) indeed traced in detail the extent of the plagiarism and cross-flow of the woodblocks between successive editions of Tagault and Vesalius. - The sixth book contains the first appearance in print of Jacques Houiller's "De materia chirurgica", discussing and illustrating the tools of surgery in use during Vesalian times before Pare and Wurtz. - Like "De fabrica", later editions of "De chirurgica institutione" were issued only in reduced format to make the work more widely accessible; the present first edition is the only printing in folio, presenting its marvellous full-page woodcuts to full effect. The large number of editions which Tagault's text enjoyed during the 16th century certainly rivals that of Vesalius and perhaps suggests that the two texts might have competed on the European stage. - Unlike the first edition of "De fabrica", which is readily obtainable in commerce, we have not traced any copy of the first edition of "De chirurgica institutione" at Anglo-American or German auctions in the last 50 years. It is one of just two editions edited by Tagault himself and published during his lifetime; the second edition (1544) was a much less impressive (and far more commonly-encountered) octavo. - A very good copy, fresh and charming despite a very light dampstain to the upper blank margin of a few leaves. {BN#44303}
¶ Cushing 27. Waller 9444 (lacking index). Not in the Wellcome. Heirs of Hippocrates 190 (the earliest edition noted being 1560).

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Four editions (1528-1531) containing six works on pharmacology, herbal medicine and magical gems (plus a mill-stone!), in blind-tooled pigskin (near Freiburg ca. 1570?) with owner's initials AW

Paulus of Aegina (ed. by Otto Brunfels and Wilhelm Kopp). Pharmaca simplicia, Orthone Brunfelsio interprete. [including:] Idem [=... Paulus of Aegina]. De ratione victus Gukielmo Copo Basiliensi interprete. (Strasbourg, Georg Ulricher, September 1531). (Strasbourg, Georg Ulricher, September 1531). 8vo (16.5 x 11 cm). (12), 86, (1 blank), (1) ff. With a finely executed woodcut on the title-page showing a female figure holding a cornucopia and with flowers and wheat growing at her feet (Flora? perhaps influenced by Fortuna and Demeter) repeated on the verso of the otherwise blank last leaf, about 20 woodcut initials with pictorial decoration (2 series, the smaller with a nearly complete alphabet and with more than one block for at least the E) plus about 20 repeats and a vine-leaf ornament (Vervliet 9). Set in an Aldine-style italic with preliminaries in Venetian-style roman and a few words of Greek. With: (2) Valla, Giorgio. De simplicium natura liber unus. Strasbourg, Heinrich Sybold, (August 1528). (104) ff. With the title in a woodcut architectural frame with a shield at the head bearing the (publisher's?) monogram (a cross with S, K and possibly H) and a woman playing a lute in the foot, and a vine-leaf ornament (Vervliet 7). Set in a Venetian-style roman type with frequent Greek printed in the fore-edge margins. (3) Odo of Meung (misattributed to Aemilius Macer). De herbarum virtutibus, cum Joannis Atrociani co[m]mentariis ... Ad haec. Strabi Galli [= Walafrid Strabo] Poetae et theologi clarissimi, hortulus vernantissimus. Freiburg im Breisgau, (Johann Faber, 1530). (4), 108 ff. With a space left for a manuscript initial at the opening of the main text, with a printed guide letter (not filled in). Set in an Aldine-style italic type with incidental Venetian-style roman and a few words of Greek. (4) Marbod of Anjou (with notes and additions by Georg Pictorius). De lapidibus pretiosis encheridion, cum scholiis Pictorii Villingensis. Eiusdem Pictorii De lapide molari carmen. [Freiburg im Breisgau, Johan Faber] 1531. 55, (1) ff. With a woodcut initial with pictorial decoration. Set in an Aldine-style italic. - 4 editions containing 6 works, in 1 volume. Blind-tooled pigskin (Freiburg or vicinity?, ca. 1570?) over tapered wooden boards, sewn on 3 double supports, laced into the boards, each board with fields edged by multiple fillets, the outer field containing a frame made from a large roll with allegorical female figures representing the four theological virtues (204 x 16 mm: "Fides", "Ivsticia", "Caritas", "Spes"), central field containing 3 fleurs-de-lis, the 2 fields to its left and right each containing 2 rosettes and a vine leaf and those above and below each containing 1 vine leaf (these 4 fields separated by diagonals at the corners). On the lower board each of the 2 remaining fields (between these last 2 and the outer frame) contains a rosette and 2 vine leaves, while on the front board the lower one is blank and the upper one contains the owner's initials "AW". The 4 spine compartments have what appear to be larger fleurs-de-lis and perhaps also larger rosettes, but they are difficult to make out. With 2 engraved brass fastenings (catch-plate, clasp on a short pigskin strap and anchor-plate). 19th-century paper spine label.

EUR 45,000.00

Four editions printed and published in Freiburg and nearby Strasbourg from 1528 to 1531, containing six works of medical and pharmacological interest, all in the original Latin: the first edition of two Byzantine pharmacological works; the first edition of a Renaissance pharmacological work; an 11th-century verse description of nearly a hundred herbal medicines, here in the second edition to include the additions and commentaries of 1527; and the third and best edition of the first lapidary, written around 1100, discussing precious stones, especially the magical and therapeutic properties of gems. - (1): First edition of two pharmacological works by the Byzantine physician Paulus of Aegina (ca. 625-ca. 690). The first, Pharmaca simplicia, prepared for publication by the great German pioneer of scientific botany Otto Brunfels (1488?-1534), provides brief accounts of the properties and uses of about 750 pharmacological simples, the basic ingredients for preparing medicines, listed mostly in alphabetical order. The second, De ratione victus, prepared by Wilhelm Kopp (ca. 1461-1532) from Basel, who moved to Paris in 1512 and became personal physician to King Louis XII, describes about 100 medicines, including mushrooms. - (2): First edition of a posthumous pharmacological encyclopaedia by the humanist professor Giorgio Valla (1447-1500) at Venice. It contains brief instructions on the use of hundreds of herbal and other medicines, arranged alphabetically. - (3): A didactic poem in Latin hexameters explaining the therapeutic value of (originally) 77 kinds of herbs, now usually attributed to the French medieval physician, Odo of Meung in the last quarter of the 11th century, but formerly to Aemilius Macer (70-16 BC) and therefore sometimes called the Macer Floridus. It was a major influence on the Salerno Regimen sanitatis and through it on the Nicolai Antidotarium, making it a central work in the evolution of European medicine. Although first published at Naples in 1477, the present publisher's 1527 Basel edition first combined it with the shorter and more botanical and horticultural poem by Walafrid Strabo (ca. 808-849), first published under the title Hortulus at Vienna in 1510, both with important new commentaries and additions by Johannes Atrocianus (ca. 1495?-ca. 1543?), giving nearly a hundred kinds of medicinal herbs. The present edition is the second to include this additional material. Strabo's poem discusses his own garden and his tending of it, describing the herbs he grows and their medicinal uses. - (4): Third and best edition (the second separate edition) of the first lapidary, written in verse around 1100 by Marbod of Anjou, Bishop of Rennes. It gives a detailed account of a wide variety of precious stones, especially the magical powers and therapeutic properties of gems. It was first published at Vienna in 1511 and was included in a collection of the author's works, Liber Marbodi, at Rennes in 1524, but the present edition was carefully edited and annotated by Georg Pictorius, who also added a few verses of his own, including (perhaps intended as a moral lesson but also no doubt with a sense of humour) one devoted to a millstone. The present edition and the better known one published by Wechel at Paris in the same year, are very similar in text, collation and layout, but since both include Pictorius's dedication to Udalrico Wirtner in Freiburg im Breisgau, Wechel seems likely to have copied the Freiburg edition rather than the other way round. Although the edition gives no place of publication or publisher's name, the main text appears to be set in the same italic as the De herbarum virtutibus bound with it, supporting VD16's attribution to Johannes Faber in Freiburg im Breisgau. Sinkankas gives two entries for what appear to be the same edition, one erroneously giving the place of publication as "Freiburg im Bremen" and inexplicably naming an unidentified "P. Willig" as publisher. - The virtues roll on the binding matches the description of Haebler, Rollen- und Plattenstempel, Landesbibliothek Dresden 123 (on a Venice book dated 1566, not yet digitized), and the paper used for the endpapers and the blank leaves between the editions shows a Prague coat of arms watermark close to Briquet 2335 (recorded at Dresden 1564 but also at Eisenbach in 1571. Freiburg im Breisgau, in southwest Germany near the French and Swiss borders, where ads 3 and 4 were published is only about 30 km from Eisenbach and about 65 km from Strasbourg, where ads 1 and 2 were published, so the book seems most likely to have been bound in the region. - With a Hebrew owner's(?) name in red ink at the foot of the title-pages of ads 1 and 3, and a later owner's inscription at the head of the first title-page, partly erased. With several contemporary and later manuscript notes. With the first title-page slightly dirty, a faint water stain in the second, and minor marginal defects in 3 leaves of ad 3 (not affecting the text), but otherwise in very good condition. The impression of the tooling on the spine is no longer clear and there are a couple small holes and minor wear, but the binding remains in good condition, with most of the tooling on the boards sharp, so that the roll and stamps are very clear. Four rare Latin works from 1528 to 1531 on pharmacology, herbal medicine and the magical and therapeutic properties of gems, bound in blind-tooled pigskin (ca. 1570). {BN#50477}
¶ (1): Adams P 496. USTC 683278. VD 16, ZV 12239. - (2): USTC 659360. VD 16, V 195. Not in Adams. - (3): Adams O 62. Durling 2892. L. Elaut, "Para-historisch kommentaar op ... de Macer Floridus, in: Scientiarum historia I (1959), pp. 149-159, at p. 153. USTC 609421. VD 16, O 270. - (4): Sinkankas 4170 & 4172. USTC 674861. VD 16, M 931 & P 2691. Ward/Corozzi 1495. Cf. Adams M 519 (1539 Cologne ed.). Wellcome 4039 (1531 Wechel ed.).

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The principal work of Rhazes

Al-Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya (Rhazes). Opus medicinae practicae saluberrium, antehac nusquam impressum, Galeatii... de sancta Sophia in nonu tractatum libri Rhasis ad Regem Almansorem, de curatione morborum particularium, huic seculo accomodatissimum [...]. Hagenau, Valentian Kobian, 25. III. 1533. Hagenau, Valentian Kobian, 25. III. 1533. Folio (215 x 316 mm). (4), 125 ff., final blank f. Title-page printed in red and black. With woodcut title border and numerous initials. - (Bound after) II: Hyginus, C[aius] Julius. Fabularum liber [...]. Basel, Johann Herwagen, March 1535. (24), 246, (2) pp. With 2 different printer's devices, 48 woodcuts in the text and numerous initials. - (Bound after) III: Alexander Trallianus. De singularum corporis partium, ab hominis coronide ad imum usque calcaneum, vitiis, aegritudinibus, & injuriis [...]. Basel, Heinrich Petri, (March 1533). (18) ff. (last blank), 342, (6) pp. With repeated woodcut printer's device and numerous initials. Contemporary wooden covers with blindstamped leather spine on four double bands. 2 clasps.

EUR 45,000.00

The principal work of Rhazes, hailed as the "Arabic Galen", frequently reissued with a wealth of commentaries as late as the Renaissance. Dedicated to Prince Almansor of Chorasan, this edition contains the commentary of the physician Galeazzo da Santa Sofia (d. 1427), a native of Padua who served in Vienna as the personal physician to Duke Albrecht IV - likely the only edition of this commentary. The volume was edited by the physician Georg Kraut, who contributed a "Libellus introductorius in artem parvam Galeni de principiis universalibus totius medicinae". - II: Bound before this is the first edition of this variously reprinted collection of Hyginus's mythographical works, "an indispensable aid for the knowledge of the subject matter of Greek tragedy" (Tusc. Lex. Lit.). This is the first appearance in print of the "Fabularum liber", edited by Jacob Micyllus; the finely illustrated "Poeticon astronomicon" had first appeared in 1482. - III: Also bound within the same volume is the second Latin edition of the works of Alexander from Tralles in Lydia (525-ca. 605), the third great physician of the Byzantine epoch, edited by the learned Swiss physician Alban Thorer (Albanus Torinus, 1489-1516). - Traces of a removed title label on the upper cover of the well-preserved binding. Finely penned annotations to Rhazes; the other works contain marginalia in a different hand. An old ownership appears to have been removed from the upper blank margin of Hyginus. Wants the first free endpaper. Some dampstaining to upper margins throughout; other margins show only occasional staining; otherwise largely clean with insignificant browning. {BN#50997}
¶ I. VD 16, M 6766. Adams R 225. BM-STC German 634. Benzing 115, 5. Bird 2030. Burg 187. Durling 1747. Haeser I, 705. Panzer VII, 111, 362. Wellcome I, 5748. Not in Lesky, Osler or Waller, not in Wolfenbüttel. - II: VD 16, H 6479. Honeyman 1738. Houzeau/L. 762. Panzer VI, 306, 1013. BM-STC German 427. Schweiger II.1, 464. Zinner 1592. Not in Adams. - III. VD 16, ZV 394. BM-STC German 20. Adams A 701 (incomplete). Choulant, Ält. Med. 136. Durling 147. Wellcome I, 206 (incomplete). Cf. Puschmann I, p. 99.

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The pearl of all books printed in Vienna (Mayer)

Francolin, Hanns von. Thurnier Buech warhafftiger ritterlicher Thaten, so in dem... Monat Junii des vergangnen LX. Jars in und ausserhalb der Statt Wienn zu Rosz und zu Fueß, auff Waser und Lannd gehalten worden [...]. (Vienna, Raphael Skrzetusky gen. Hofhalter), [1561]. (Vienna, Raphael Skrzetusky gen. Hofhalter), [1561]. Small folio (202 x 279 mm). (6), LXXX (but: 84), (1) pp. (collation: A6; B-N4 [N4 blank], O-P4 Q2, R-X4, x2, Y-Z4). Title page printed in red and black surrounded by a border of 10 armorial woodcuts. With full-page woodcut portrait of Emperor Ferdinand I by Donat Hübschmann on verso, large emblematic etching by Johann Schlutpacher von Rauris (A6v), full-page woodcut by Hans Lautensack of the standard-bearer Heinrich the younger, Burgrave of Meissen (E1r), 45 woodcut coat-of-arms in quire x, on Z1r woodcut device incorporating the arms of the printer, a Polish nobleman. 7 large folded etched plates, including two by Hanns Lautensack (at G4 and N4), one attributed to Francesco Terzi (at H2), one by the monogrammist FA (at I3), one attributed to Giovanni Guerra (at Q2), one unsigned (at X3), and one attributed to Johann Thwenger. Early 19th century half calf.

EUR 35,000.00

First German edition of the finest early printed book on tournaments. It describes in detail and spectacularly illustrates the tournaments, staged battles (including an elaborate naval scene), balls and banquets, held at Vienna to honour the visit of Albrecht V Duke of Bavaria (1528-79), son-in-law of Emperor Ferdinand I and brother-in-law of King Maximilian of Bohemia (Emperor Maximilian II from 1564 onwards). According to Graesse (II, 629), the Latin edition of the same year has different illustrations, which he describes as "moins bonnes", and the same is true for Feyerabend's Frankfurt edition appended to Rüxner's "Thurnier Buch" (1566). The author served as herald to John II Sigismund, King of Hungary. - In complete condition with the full complement of etched plates, the book is of the utmost rarity; both Ruggieri copies were imperfect, and Bartsch describes only three of the etchings. - Fine impressions throughout. Some light browning and marginal fingerstaining; a few tears or flaws to the plates reinforced or rebacked. Rebound in the early 18th century for the Austrian infantry captain and secretary to the military court Franz von Grössing (his handwritten ownership at the bottom of title-page and colophon), preserving the upper third of the original flyleaf with handwritten ownerships dating from the 1560s (Rosina and H. V. Bastrig[o] 1561; gifted to Bernhard Kulmer by his sister Barbara Poltus, but returned to Bastrig in 1563 "as he will not allow the gift, and has a better right to the book"). Latterly in the library of the Viennese collector Werner Habel (1939-2015) with his handwritten and stamped ownership to the new flyleaf. {BN#48925}
¶ VD 16, F 2207. Ruggieri 827. Brunet Suppl. II, 767. BNHCat F 406. Mayer I, 88f. Watanabe 21.

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The principal Renaissance treatise on mining

Agricola, Georg. Vom Bergkwerck XII. Bücher darinn alle Empter, Instrument,... Gezeug und alles zu diesem Handel gehörig [...]. Basel, Hieronymus Froben & Nikolaus Episcopius, 1557. Basel, Hieronymus Froben & Nikolaus Episcopius, 1557. Folio (225 x 326 mm). (8), 491, (13) pp. With printer's woodcut device on title-page and verso of final leaf, a double-page-sized woodcut plate and numerous large woodcuts in the text (some 70 of which are page-sized). Contemporary limp vellum with fore-edge flap.

EUR 35,000.00

First translation ever of the principal Renaissance treatise on mining, prepared for German readers by Philipp Bech. Significantly rarer than the Latin first edition (PMM 79) published the previous year, as most of the printed sheets ended up being used for the 1580 second German edition. "A book that has earned its place in history as a masterpiece of Renaissance technical writing and technical illustration" (Hoover). "Treats the entire field of mining and metallurgy, including the overlapping subjects of geology and chemistry, but in particular mechanical engineering and machine technology" (cf. Koch). "Of the 292 woodcuts, 269 concern mining, economic geology, surveying instruments, tools and machinery, mine workings, and even salt production from the sea, a glass foundry, etc. They were cut in Basel after designs by Basilius Wefring of Joachimsthal. At least two known masters had a hand in the woodcuts: the draughtsman H. R. Manuel Deutsch from Bern and the woodcutter Z. Specklin from Strasbourg" (Horst). - Light, mostly even browning throughout; some fingerstaining to title with edges somewhat frayed, but well preserved in the unusual and entirely contemporary limp vellum binding with a generous flap protecting the fore-edge. Early 16th century bibliographical note concerning Porta's "De refractione" penned to lower pastedown. Provenance: early handwritten ownership of "Andreas Virizius" on front pastedown. While the "possessor huius libri" calls himself a "conterfecter" (portrait painter), he may be identical with the like-named student of the Flemish humanist Justus Lipsius who flourished in Danzig around 1599, gave private instruction and produced several translations from Latin into German (cf. Jöcher IV, 1645). {BN#49345}
¶ VD 16, A 935. IA 101.560. Hoover 22. Koch 6 & pp. 34ff. Darmstaedter, Agricola 45 & 88. Michaelis-Prescher 22. Horst 771ff. Lipperheide Pd1. Cf. Horblit 2b. Sparrow 4. Dibner 88. PMM 79 (1556 Latin first edition).

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The astrology of carrots and related root vegetables, by an eccentric and colourful charlatan travelling in Egypt and Asia Minor: rare coloured copy

Thurneisser zum Thurn, Leonhard. Historia unnd Beschreibung influentischer, elementischer und natürlicher Wirckungen,... aller fremden unnd heimischen Erdgewechssen, auch irer Subtiliteten, sampt warhafftiger und künstlicher Conterfeitung derselbigen [...]. (Berlin, Michael Hentzke, 1578). (Berlin, Michael Hentzke, 1578). Folio (255 x 381 mm). (12), 156 [but: 158], (24) pp. With the title in a large and elaborately decorated woodcut, 36 large botanical, 12 large astronomical and about 112 small woodcut illustrations in text, and the author’s woodcut heraldic device above the colophon, nearly all coloured by a near-contemporary hand. 17th century gold-tooled, dark brown tanned sheepskin.

EUR 35,000.00

Elaborately coloured copy of the first German edition of a bizarre astrologico-botanical work, translated from the Latin edition published earlier that same year, by the Basel-born Berlin physician, alchemist, astrologist, botanist and linguist Leonard Thurneysser (1531-96). It discusses astrological influences on the growth, composition and medical efficacy of plants, and includes an index of plant names in the usual Latin and German, but also more interestingly in Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and Persian. "Hand-colored copies [...] are rare" (Macphail). - Thurneysser, the son of a Basel goldsmith, frequently got into trouble as a con-artist and swindler. He travelled in Egypt and Asia Minor in the 1560s collecting information on medicinal plants, astrology and other subjects under the patronage of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria, then settled in Berlin under patronage of the Elector of Brandenburg. He intended the present book on umbelliferous plants (carrots and related root vegetables) as the first in a ten-volume series covering all plants, but published only this first volume. Apart from the larger botanical and astrological woodcut illustrations, there are smaller ones showing human skeletons and organs (indicating where the plants supposedly takes its medicinal effect), as well as distilling and other equipment. While the book's "botanical value, as well as its medical value, was absolutely nil" (Anderson), it nevertheless proved influential. It is a typographic tour de force, set mostly in two columns with numerous headings, and notes printed in the fore-edge margins and sometimes in a third column between the text columns. - With two 20th-c. bookplates of the Italian physician and collector Piergiorgio Borio on the front pastedown. Waterstained at the head throughout and sometimes also along the fore-edge, mostly confined to the margins; slight browning, an occasional stain not affecting the colours of the illustrations. Margins of the title-page thumbed, but still generally in good condition. A rare, extensively coloured copy of an extraordinary work, as colourful as the text and the author’s life. {BN#46022}
¶ VD 16, T 1172 (7 copies). Adams T 690. Nissen 1964. Durling 4353. Wellcome 6300. Ferguson II, 451. Anderson, Herbals, 181-186. Arber 215-218. Hunt 135. Macphail, Alchemy & Occult 45.

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d'une rareté excessive

Heyden, Sebald. Musicae, id est, artis canendi libri duo. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. Nuremberg, Johann Petreius, 1537. 4to. (8), 115, (1) pp. With armorial title woodcut, several initials and numerous music notes in the text. Contemporary limp vellum with manuscript spine title. Wants ties.

EUR 35,000.00

Extremely rare first edition of one of the most important of all classic works of musical theory, a book that enjoyed a high reputation even during the author's lifetime. In contrast to his first treatise, the 1532 "Musicae stoicheiosis" which treats exclusively "musica figurata", or polyphony, his present, second work is more comprehensive and more clearly written, though limited "to matters concerning musical compositions withount discussion of purely theoretical matters. This publication was outstanding for its many examples, drawn, according to the author's prefatory statement, from the works of the best and most renowned composers - Josquin, Obrecht, La Rue, Isaac, Brumel, Ghiselin - not only as the most useful examples but also as demonstrations of great music. The examples are presented mostly without texts or with incipits only" (New Grove). "Heyden s'est fait particulièrement connaître d'une manière avantageuse par un livre [...] ce livre est précieux pour l'histoire de l'art et de la science au seizieme siècle. Dans aucun livre de ce temps, les principes des nuances et de la notation ne sont exposés avec autant de clarté et de concision que dans celui-ci. Les nombreux exemples de Josquin, d'Obrecht, de Senfel, de Henri Isaac, de Ghiselin et d'autres, qui s'y trouvent, avec les résolutions de cas embarassants de l'ancien système de proportions, ajoutent encore au prix de cet ouvrage, qui est malheureusement d'une rareté excessive" (Fétis). All of Petreius's "printed music is of exquisite beauty [...] The printer's glory days began in 1537, with Heyden's highly respected work about choral music" (Cohen, Nürnberger Musikdrucker im 16. Jh., p. 25f.). - Occasional insignificant waterstaining to margins, but altogether a splendidly crisp, wide-margined copy with contemporary handwritten ownership of one "Anastasius de Verona" (erased) on the title page. Of the utmost rarity: a single copy in auction records of the past decades (1968, Hauswedell 158, no. 1246), and a single copy of the 1540 second edition (1942: Schab, cat. 5, no. 113; which is also the only edition kept at Cambridge). {BN#47554}
¶ BM-STC German 404. Eitner V, 137. RISM (Écrits impr.) 412. Hirsch I, 246. Wolffheim I, 705. Teramoto (Petreius) passim. New Grove VIII, 28.

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Astronomical and surveying instruments from the time of Galileo, with a world map in two hemispheres with movable volvelles

Gallucci, Giovanni Paolo. Della fabrica et uso di diversi stromenti di... astronomia, et cosmografia, ove si vede la somma della teorica, et pratica di queste due nobilissime scienze. Venice, Roberto Meietti, 1598. Venice, Roberto Meietti, 1598. 4to (22 × 16.5 cm). With engraved title-page, folding woodcut plate, 3 woodcut volvelles with moving parts, and numerous woodcut illustrations in text. Including a world map in two hemispheres (incl. America and a scattering of islands at the location of Australia) on two facing pages, they reappear with volvelle attachments on both sides of leaf 149 and leaf 153. Contemporary limp sheepskin parchment.

EUR 35,000.00

First edition of a well-illustrated encyclopaedia of astronomical and surveying instruments available since classical history, by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Paolo Gallucci (1538-ca. 1621), a well-known private teacher to the Venetian nobility and founding member of the Second Venetian Academy. It gives a comprehensive summary of the knowledge of astronomy, cosmography and mathematics at the time of Galileo. "It describes instruments designed by others (Finé, Apian, Gemma Frisius, etc.) and gives credit to the original inventors. The one exception to this is the Visorio, which Gallucci claims as his own, but an identical instrument by Waldseemüller can be found illustrated in the 1512 edition of Margarita Philosophica by Gregor Reisch. Other instruments, such as the Hemispherical Uranico (a complicated device used for computations dealing with the moon, sun and stars), appear to be of Gallucci's invention. Besides the usual portable instruments, he also includes a simple quadrant and a two-ringed armillary built into the church of Santa Maria Novella in Florence" (Erwin Tomash). For some of the instruments this is the only description available. The present second issue of the first edition appeared a year after the first. With the owner's label of the Capuchin friar and astronomer Agostino da Piacenza (1747-1839) and the relating library stamp "Bibliotheca Capucinorum Placentiae" on the engraved title-page. A few marginal water stains and some occasional spots, otherwise in very good condition. {BN#49029}
¶ Adams G 167. Burden 96. Cantamessa 1688. Crone 98. Erwin Tomash 23. Shirley 199. for Gallucci: G. Ernst, "Gallucci, Giovanni Paolo" in: Treccani LI (1998).

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Earliest prints of Jewish customs & ceremonies

Pfefferkorn, Johann. Libellus de Judaica confessione sive sabbato afflictionis. (Nuremberg, Johann Weißenburger, [150]8). (Nuremberg, Johann Weißenburger, [150]8). 4to. (20) pp. With a title woodcut and 4 woodcuts in the text (repeating the title cut). Later quarter vellum over marbled boards.

EUR 35,000.00

The rarer of two Latin editions of the "Judenbeichte", both published in 1508, after the "Judenspiegel" the second treatise by the fanatical convert Johann Pfefferkorn (1469-1522/23), in which he discusses his former brothers in the Jewish faith and their celebrations, asserting that the Jews were more corrupting than the devil himself and petitioning the Christian authorities to force all Jews to convert or emigrate. The woodcut illustrations in Pfefferkorn's work are the earliest prints depicting Jewish customs and ceremonies. They include a Kapparot scene, ritual bath, matzo preparation, jumbled together with imaginary representations of Jews telling their sins to crows and a Tashlich service during Rosh Hashanah when sins are cast into water. - Pfefferkorn was a German Catholic theologian and writer. Born Jewish, possibly in Nuremberg, he moved to Cologne after many years of wandering. After committing a burglary, he was imprisoned and released in 1504. He converted and was baptized together with his family. Pfefferkorn became an assistant to the prior of the Dominicans at Cologne, Jacob van Hoogstraaten, and under the their auspices published several libellous pamphlets in which he tried to demonstrate that Jewish religious writings were hostile to Christianity, and argued for the destruction of all copies of the Talmud. As late as 1509, Emperor Maximilian empowered Pfefferkorn to confiscate all Hebrew writings in Jewish hands and destroy any he found dangerous. After wide-scale protests, the humanist scholar Johannes Reuchlin was commissioned to give an expert opinion on Jewish writings, which led to a long-running battle of pamphlets between Reuchlin and Pfefferkorn, who was defended by the Dominicans. - A single red pencil annotation to the colophon, otherwise entirely unmarked. {BN#50489}
¶ VD 16, P 2311. Panzer VII, 447, 53. Goedeke I, 452. Freimann 263. BNHCat P 429. Cf. Graesse V, 248. Fürst III, 82. Not in Adams or BM-STC German (only the Cologne edition).

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First dated edition, with ca. 800 hand-coloured woodcuts

[Lonicer, Adam (attrib.)]. Herbarum, arborum, fruticum, frumentorum ac leguminum, animalium praeterea... terrestrium, volatiliu[m] & aquatilium [...] imagines [...] depictae [...]. Kreutter, Bäume, Gesteude, unnd Frücht, deßgleichen Gethier, zam unnd wild, im Lufft, Wasser und Erdtrich lebende [...]. Frankfurt/Main, Christian Egenolph, (1546). Frankfurt/Main, Christian Egenolph, (1546). 4to. (16), 265, (1) pp. With a large woodcut on the title-page showing a gardener at work with his tools, and about 800 woodcut illustrations in the text. About 700 show trees, fruit, edible and medicinal plants, while the rest show insects, a tick, coral, shells, various sea and land animals and a view of a pond with plants and birds. It includes a two-headed snake, dragon, griffin, and a few other mythical creatures. With all woodcuts coloured by a contemporary hand. Contemporary pigskin over wooden boards, richly blind-tooled in a panel design with two rolls (one alternating heads and coats of arms, the other with standing figures), a large acorn and other stamps; brass clasps and catch-plates with engraved decoration.

EUR 28,000.00

Rare first dated edition of an extensively illustrated early herbal in contemporary hand-colour, with the title and most of the plant and animal names in Latin and German. The title-page is followed by a 13-page index of the Latin and German names. About 200 of the woodcuts are about half-page, while the last six pages show 16 small animal woodcuts per page. The Folger Library notes that F. W. E. Roth attributes this herbal to Adam Lonicer (1528-86) of Marburg and Frankfurt, who married Egenolph's daughter and became a partner in the firm after Egenolph died in 1555. The firm published herbals and related works under his name beginning in 1551. Egenolph published all three editions of the present herbal. VD 16 lists the undated one as ca. 1545 (citing only the Wellcome Library copy), which would make the present 1546 edition the second. Another appeared in 1552. Egenolph's successors were to become famous not only as printers but also as one of the largest and most important early typefoundries. The present book uses Roman and Italic for the Latin, but Fraktur and Schwabacher for the German, giving a good overview of the firm's stock of type at this early date. - This copy has early owner's inscriptions by the Nuremberg pharmacist Georg Volland (d. 1631) in Latin at the foot of the title-page and in Greek on the facing endleaf. - Binding worn; some browning and stains to interior, especially to the first and last leaves. {BN#27991}
¶ VD 16, H 2193 (4 copies). Adams H 294 (1 copy). Nissen, BBI 2345. Cf. Klebs, Early Herbals 71 (undated Egenolph ed.). Wellcome I, 1983 (same undated Egenolph ed.). Not in Stiftung Botanik.

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