First edition of one of the most important natural history books of the Renaissance, with 158 hand-coloured woodcuts

Belon, Pierre. L'histoire de la nature des oyseaux, avec leurs... descriptions, & naifs portraicts retirez du naturel: escrite en sept livres [...]. Paris, for Gilles Corrozet (by Benoist Prevost), 1555. Paris, for Gilles Corrozet (by Benoist Prevost), 1555. Folio. (28), 381 (but: 379, lacking blank pages 275-276), (1) pp. Ruled throughout in red. With woodcut publisher's device on general title-page, variant woodcut publisher's device on the 6 part-titles, and 161 woodcuts in the text, including a portrait of the author, 2 skeletons, and 158 large cuts of birds, all in contemporary hand colour. 18th century calf with richly gold-tooled spine and red edges.

EUR 65,000.00

First and only early edition of one of the first books devoted solely to birds, with contemporary hand-coloured woodcuts by Pierre Gourdelle and others. It was intended as a compendium of ornithology and includes an important comparison of human and avian skeletons, which became the foundation of the science of comparative anatomy. The work is divided into seven parts: the first on the anatomy and physiology of birds; the second on birds of prey; the third on swimming birds; the fourth on coastal birds; the fifth on galliformes; the sixth on crows and similar species; and the seventh on songbirds. The second part also includes a chapter on falconry. - The work was published in two issues, with variant title-pages of the publishers Gilles Corrozet and Guillaume Cavellat. - Lacking blank pages 275-276 and the final blank leaf. Title page soiled and restored, with later owner's inscription; lower corners thumbed throughout; occasional stains and minor foxing. Still in good condition, with contemporary hand-coloured illustrations. {BN#33225}
¶ Anker 9-10. Mortimer (French) 50. Nissen, IVB 86. Ronsil 189. Schwerdt I, 59. Zimmer 52. Brunet I, 762. Graesse I, 331. For Belon cf. DSB I, 595-596.

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Belon's account of his extensive travels in the Levant, with 44 woodcut illustrations

Belon, Pierre. Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables,... trouvées en Grece, Asie, Judée, Egypte, Arabie et autres pays estranges. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1555. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1555. 4to. 3 parts in 1 volume. (12), 212, (1) ff. With title in woodcut border with Cavellet's device and initials at the foot, each part-title with Cavellet's woodcut device, 1 folding woodcut map (315 x 350 mm) showing Mount Sinai, 44 woodcuts in the text (including a portrait of the author by Geoffroy Tory), and numerous fine decorated initials. Main text set in italic, with preface and commentary in roman. Overlapping vellum (ca. 1600?), sewn on 5 cords, laced through the joints.

EUR 12,500.00

Third edition of Belon's "Observations", the fruit of his extensive travels in Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon and Syria from 1546 to 1549. The naturalist Pierre Belon (c. 1518-64), famous for his works on ornithology, was attached to the French embassy to the Ottoman Empire, led by Gabriel de Luetz (Luez, Luels) d'Aramont, who aimed at convincing Suleiman the Magnificent to join forces against Charles V. The envoy sailed for Venice in December 1546 and proceeded to Croatia. Here Luetz continued overland to Adrianople (Edirne), while Belon sailed for Istanbul by way of Greece, visiting Lemnos, Macedonia, Crete and Kavala en route. He reached Istanbul in August 1547, explored the city and continued to Alexandria, while Luetz accompanied Suleiman to Persia. Belon's journey continued to Cairo, Mount Sinai, Jerusalem, Damascus, Baalbek, Aleppo, and again to Turkey. - Unlike many contemporary travel writers, Belon does not elaborate on extraordinary adventures, but rather limits himself to detailed observations on mammals, fish, snakes, birds, plants and the manners and customs of the peoples he encountered, commenting only on what he himself had witnessed. The fine woodcuts, attributed to Arnold Nicolai and Pierre Goudet (Gourdelle), include a map of the Dardanelles (Hellespont), a folding map of Mount Sinai, a view of Alexandria, coins with Arabic inscriptions, 3 illustrations of Egyptian costumes, a giraffe, chameleon and, surprisingly, a flying dragon and an armadillo. - The first edition was published in 1553, illustrated with 35 woodcuts only, followed by a second, augmented edition in 1554. The present edition was a joint publication of Guillaume Cavellat and Gilles Corrozet, comprising two issues with either Corrozet's or Cavallet's name in the imprint. - With printed description from a sales catalogue on pastedown, slightly browned, some light waterstains, folding plate mounted. Overall in very good condition. {BN#32002}
¶ Adams B 564. Aboussouan 94. Ibrahim-Hilmy 61. Gay 10. Nissen, ZBI 304. Tobler 72f. USTC 6761. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 505 (1st ed. 1553). Atabey 93 (2nd ed.). Blackmer 115 (same copy). Weber II, 153 (1st ed. 1553). Henze I, 237 (first edition). Hage Chahine 393 (later ed.). For the author: Dictionnaire des orientalistes, 75f.

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Belon's detailed account of his travels in the Levant, with a folding map of Mount Sinai

Belon, Pierre. Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables,... trouvées en Grece, Asie, Judée, Egypte, Arabie et autres pays estranges. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corrozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1553. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corrozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1553. 4to (215 x 165 mm). 3 parts in 1 volume. (12), 210, (2) ff. With Cavellat's woodcut device on title-page and part-titles, 36 woodcut illustrations in the text (4 hand-coloured), numerous decorated initals, and an extra added folding woodcut map (31 x 32.5 cm) showing Mount Sinai. The main text set in italic, with the preface and commentary in roman. 18th-century marbled calf, gold-tooled spine in 6 compartments, with gold-tooled title labe in the second, gold-tooled board edges.

EUR 15,000.00

First edition of Pierre Belon's "Observations", the result of his extensive travels in Greece, Asia Minor, Egypt, Arabia and Palestine from 1546 to 1549. Belon was part of the French embassy to the Ottoman Empire, led by Gabriel de Luetz (Luez, Luels) and aimed at convincing Suleiman the Magnificent to join forces against Charles V. Divided into three parts, Belon extensively describes the natural history and the religion, customs and traditions of the peoples he encounters, with detailed observations on the pyramids, Mount Sinai, Damascus, and the consumption of opium. The fine woodcuts, attributed to Arnold Nicolai and Pierre Goudet (Gourdelle), include a hand-coloured map of the Dardanelles (Hellespont), a view of Alexandria, an illustration of a giraffe, and coins with Arabic inscriptions. The present copy is augmented with a folding map of Mount Sinai that was first published in the second edition. - Pierre Belon du Mans (c. 1518-1564) studied medicine in Paris, where he took the degree of doctor before becoming a pupil of the brilliant botanist Valerius Cordus at Wittenberg, with whom he travelled throughout Germany. Cordus died of malaria in Italy in 1544, and Belon, on his return to France, came under the patronage of François, Cardinal de Tournon. At 46 Belon was murdered in the Bois de Boulogne. - Contemporary owner's inscription on title page ("Ex libris Petri Drouotz") and several contemporary annotations (by the same?) in the margins. Title-page slightly shaved and somewhat dirty, the folding map showing slight waterstains. In very good condition. {BN#32127}
¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 505. Adams B 564. Ibrahim-Hilmy, p. 61; Nissen, ZBI 304. USTC 12912. Brunet I, 762. Graesse I, 331. Cf. Atabey 93 (2nd edition); Blackmer 115 (same copy). Hage Chahine 393 (later ed.). Röhricht, Bibliotheca Palaestinae 186 (for Gil. Corrozet).

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The bulk of the inhabitants of Dubai territory belong to the tribe of Al Bu Falasah, a branch of the Bani Yas

[Iraq Petroleum Company]. Handbook of the territories which form the theatre... of operations of the Iraq Petroleum Company Limited and its associated companies. London, Iraq Petroleum Company, 1948. London, Iraq Petroleum Company, 1948. 8vo. VIII, (2), 152 pp. With a frontispiece (portrait of King Faisal I of Iraq), 27 plates, and 1 folding map. Publisher's original cloth. With: (II:) [Iraq Petroleum Company]. Iraq Oil in 1954. 34 pp. Original wrappers. (III:) Dinner Dance Documents (guest list, invitation, etc.), 1954. (IV:) 2 typed letters signed.

EUR 4,500.00

First edition, second issue (reprinted February, 1949) of this overview of the Middle Eastern regions emerging as the great oil exporting countries of the century: Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Bahrain, the then Trucial Coast (now the UAE) and Qatar, including the "Hinterland Tribes", Oman, and Kuwait, as well as Iraq and the Levant. Providing details of the companies, the local geography, climate, culture, and political history, this forms an invaluable compendium on the region and ruling personalities as they presented themselves in the immediate postwar years: "The Trucial Rulers acknowledge the paramount position of H.M.G., represented by the Political Resident, but no restrictions are placed upon their independence provided that they adhere to the various Conventions which they have signed [...] Each of the Rulers [...] is thus in direct treaty relations with the British Government [...] A representative of the Political Resident is now stationed at Sharjah. Up to the middle of the nineteenth century the Jawasim power, with its headquarters at Sharjah and Ras al Khaimah, was paramount along the coast, with the Sharjah Shaijh as the principal ruler. This is no longer the case; the seven States recognised by H.M.G. as independent are now equal in status. The Peninsula of Qatar is historically distinct from the Trucial Coast but its Shaikh, early in the present century, entered into agreements with H.M.G. similar to theose of the Trucial rulers [...]. The Shaikhdom of Qatar covers the Peninsula of that name [...] Dohah is the Shaikh's capital and the only considerable village. The north-western end of the peninsula is claimed by the Al Khalifah as the homeland of the present Bahrain dynasty, and bad relations arising from this have frequently brought the two Shaikhs to the verge of war. Otherwise, the Qatar people have few outside contacts. The present ruler, Shaikh 'Abdullah bin Jasim al Thani, is very old and was much influenced by his son and heir Hamad, who died in 1948 [...] The Shaikhdom of Abu Dhabi is in size of territory by far the largest of the Trucial Coast [...] The ruler, Shaikh Shakhbut bin Sultan of the Al Bu Falah, is a quiet, nervous personality. He has three brothers, Hazza', Khalid and Za'id, of whom the last named is probably the outstanding and most influential person in the whole of Trucial Oman [...] The village of Abu Dhabi is situated on a barren island off the coast and is not visited by steamers [...] The bulk of the inhabitants of Dubai territory belong to the tribe of Al Bu Falasah, a branch of the Bani Yas. The Shaikh's authority of largely confined to the coast. Dubai creek has been used as a landing-place for flying boats [...]". Profusely illustrated, including "Early Days in Qatar", aerial photographs of Qatar as well as of Manamah in Bahrain, "Pearl Divers Opening Their Shells", etc. - The Iraq Petroleum Company (IPC) had virtual monopoly on all oil exploration and production in Iraq from 1925 to 1961. It was involved in other parts of the Middle East, and played a major role in the discovery and development of oil resources in the region. IPC operations were taken over by the Iraq National Oil Company after they were nationalised by the Ba'athist government in June 1972. - A good copy. {BN#50144}

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Unknown Beethoven sketchleaf

Beethoven, Ludwig van, composer (1770-1827). Autograph sketchleaf to op. 117, "König Stephan" ("Ungarns... erster Wohltäter"). [Teplitz, 1811]. [Teplitz, 1811]. 2 pages in ink and pencil on 16-stave paper (322:234 mm), with two folds. Formerly sewn on the left margin, leaving three punched holes. Accompanied by two autograph letters signed from Friedrich Wilhelm Künzel in Leipzig to Fred M. Steele of Chicago, dated July 16th, 1886, discussing the acquisition and certifying the authenticity of the present leaf. Stored in custom-made green morocco portfolio.

EUR 250,000.00

A densely-used two-sided autograph sketchleaf containing music to opus 117, "König Stephan" or "Ungarns erster Wohltäter" ("Hungary's first Benefactor"), the front showing, among other motifs, the opening cello/bassoon line for the beginning of the first movement chorus, "Ruhend von seinen Thaten" (Andante maestoso e con moto, C major), and the verso with material from the end of the movement, all over with various freely written passages in ink and pencil, mostly on single staves, some with text underneath, containing many holograph corrections and instances where ink is written over pencil. - The present sketchleaf, apparently hitherto unknown to scholarship, belongs to a book of sketches that Beethoven used while writing his stage music "König Stephan" in 1811. Beethoven created his own book from various paper on hand and used it while at the spa in Teplitz from late 1810 into mid 1811. He finished "König Stephan" between 20 August and mid-September 1811. The sketches are of the first chorus (after the overture). The musical play was commissioned for the opening of the new theatre in Pest along with "The Ruins of Athens". First performed on 9 February 1812, it was published as op. 117. King Stephen I founded Hungary in 1000. Emperor Francis I of Austria commissioned the new theatre, and Beethoven was chosen as the composer to honour the occasion of the opening. The Austrian Emperor was honouring Hungary's loyalty, thus the subject matter on a text by August von Kotzebue. - The Beethoven-Haus in Bonn holds four other sketches from this sketchbook (viewable in their digital online archive, as entries HCB Bsk 2/50, 3/51, 4/52, and Mh 81), all of which share the same three holes punched on the left-side margin of the present sketch. We would like to thank Dr. Carmelo Comberiati, professor of Music History at Manhattanville College, for his assistance in cataloguing this lot. - Provenance: Friedrich Wilhelm Künzel, Leipzig, before 1886; Collection of Fred M. Steele, Chicago, purchased from the above, 1886. Offered in the "Collection of Important Autographs in the estate of Mrs. Ella P. Steele, widow of Mr. Fred M. Steele" (Philadelphia, 1918). Acquired from the purchaser's descendants, last located in Greenwich, CT. {BN#45287}
¶ For an in-depth discussion of the pages to which this sketch belongs, cf. Douglas Johnson, Alan Tyson and Robert Winter, "The Beethoven Sketchbooks", p. 201-206.

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The principal harbours of the Mediterranean

[Roux, Joseph] / Allezard, Jean Joseph. Recueil de 163 principaux plans des ports et... rades de la Mediterranée. Leghorn, Giacopo Aliprandi, 1817. Leghorn, Giacopo Aliprandi, 1817. Oblong 4to. Coloured engraving of flags (civil and war ensigns) as frontispiece, engraved title page and 163 engaved maps (some lightly coloured). With 2 letterpress pp. of index at the end and a folding engr. plan of the harbor of Odessa (not belonging to this work). Contemprary half calf.

EUR 7,500.00

Pocket-size atlas of the principal harbour installations and bays of the Mediterranean, many of which at the time were still in Ottoman possession. They include numerous ports on the Barbary Coast (Tanger, Oran, Algiers, Tunis, Monastir, Sfax, Tripoli, Bengasi, Essaouira), the Greek islands, and the Eastern coast of the Mediterranean (Beirut, Tyre). - Long the principal route for merchants and travellers between Europe and the East, allowing for trade and cultural exchange between the many peoples of the region, the development of a sea route to the Indian Ocean from the late 15th century onwards made possible the importation of Asian spices and other goods through the Atlantic ports of western Europe and diminished the importance of the Mediterranean route. Only in the second half of the 19th century would it once more become an important passageway for goods and travellers: after the opening of the Suez Canal half a century after the present publication, it enabled ships to reach the Eastern world in record time, with dramatic effects on world trade. - Binding slightly rubbed; handwritten ownership "L. Falciola" on flyleaf. A good, clean copy, formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. {BN#33426}
¶ Scheepvaart Mus. 62. OCLC 560616922. Cf. Phillips 196, 3974 & 5172; Zacharakis 1967-2040 (other eds.).

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Famous hippiatric manual

Markham, Gervase. Markham's Maister-Peece, Containing all Knowledge Belonging to the... Smith, Farrier, or Horse-Leech, Touching the Curing of all Diseases in Horses [...] Now the seventh time newly imprinted, corrected and augmented [...]. London, William Wilson, 1651. London, William Wilson, 1651. 4to. (14), 591, (23) pp, final blank. With additional engr. title page (frontispiece), 4 full-page text woodcuts (2 folding) and several smaller woodcuts in the text, as well as 1 folding woodcut plate, latterly backed with cloth. Sumptuous mid-19th-century three quarter morocco binding with gilt spine.

EUR 15,000.00

Extremely rare and early edition of this great English hippiatric manual, first published in 1615, by one of the earliest western owners of and dealers in Arabian horses. A distinctly modern touch is provided by the small woodcut pointing hands scattered about the margins, denoting new cures and "medicines that are most certaine and approved; and heretofore never published". Gervase (Gervais, Jarvis) Markham, as well as his father Robert, a Nottinghamshire MP and Sheriff, was the owner of valuable horses, and "is said to have imported the first Arab. In a list of Sir Henry Sidney's horses in 1589 'Pied Markham' is entered as having been sold to the French ambassador [and it, or a horse of the same name, may have been given to Markham by Sir Francis Walsingham], and Gervase sold an Arabian horse to James I for £500" (DNB). - Variously browned; occasional corner faults (no loss to text). From the library of Sir Robert Throckmorton, Bt. (1800-62), member of an eminent Anglo-Catholic noble family who sat in the House of Commons from 1831 to 1835 (his bookplate on front pastedown; a later bookplate is opposite on the flyleaf). {BN#32364}
¶ Wing M659. Poynter 20.7. Wellcome IV, 56 (incomplete). Cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, 156. Huth p. 17 (other editions).

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The first comprehensive English book about the care, breeding, and riding of horses

Blundeville, Thomas. The Foure Chiefest Offices Belonging to Horsemanship: That... is to Say, the Office of the Breeder, of the Rider, of the Keeper, and of the Ferrer. London, Humfrey Lownes, 1609. London, Humfrey Lownes, 1609. 4to. 2 pts. in 1 volume. (232) pp., including two title pages with fine woodcut borders. With 50 nearly full-page woodcut illustrations in the text. Bound to style in modern blindstamped brown calf with giltstamped red spine label and sparsely gilt spine.

EUR 8,500.00

Early edition of the first comprehensive book in the English language about the care, breeding, and riding of horses. The "Four Offices" are those of the breeder, rider, keeper, and ferrer: this volume contains the first two offices. Among the illustrations are 43 full-page examples of bits and bridles. Some 17th- or 18th-c. ink annotations. Blundevill(e) (1522-1606) was, according to the Arabian Jockey Club, "one of the founders of the thoroughbred industry." He originally translated Gisone's "Gli Ordini di Cavalcare" (1550) as "The Art of Rydynge" (1560), which was the first modern treatise on classical dressage and later incorporated as one of the chapters of this book. First published in 1565/66; all editions published prior to 1650 are considered uncommon. {BN#32016}
¶ DNB V, 271.

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Very rare French herbal, with ca. 300 woodcut illustrations, including a male and female mandrake

Platearius, Matthaeus, and others. Le grant herbier en Francoys contenant les qualitez... vertus et proprietez des herbes arbres gommes semences huylles et pierres precieuses extraict de plusieurs traictez de medecine. Comme de Avicenne Rasis, Constantin, Isaac, Plataire, et Ypocras selon le commun usaige. Imprime nouvellement a Paris. 47. xliii. Paris, (colophon: printed by Estienne Groulleau), [ca. 1550?]. Paris, (colophon: printed by Estienne Groulleau), [ca. 1550?]. Small 4to (20 x 14.5 cm). (22), "CLXXVI" [= CLXVI] ff. With the title-page printed in red and black and about 300 woodcut illustrations in the text (nearly all botanical, with a few animals, including an elephant) including a few repeats (2 on the title-page, 4 facing the first page of text and at least 1 in the text). Later sheepskin parchment, with red morocco title-label on spine.

EUR 28,000.00

Extremely rare edition of one of the most important early French herbals, first published at Besançon (and Lyon?) ca. 1486/88 under the title Arbolayre and in Paris beginning in 1498 under the present title. More than half the text is a French adaptation of the Latin "antidotium" Dispensarium or Circa instans, attributed to Matthaeus Platearius or Matteo Plateario (d. 1161?) at Salerno and first printed at Venice in 1471. Other parts are based on the writings of Avicenna (Ibn Sina), Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, Hippocrates and other ancient medical authorities. "There is probably no book in all of herbal literature which has caused greater bibliographical confusion than Le grant herbier. ... Complete and undamaged copies are almost unheard of." (Anderson). The new editions from age of François I, who brought the French Renaissance into bloom (here almost literally), helped to bring ancient Arabic and Greek medical knowledge to a wider and less scholarly public, including many practicing pharmacologists, apothecaries and doctors. The plants are listed in alphabetical order and with an account of their medicinal uses. This edition illustrates both a male and a female mandrake. There are also a few animals, including an early illustration of an elephant. A flurry of editions by several printing offices began to appear at Paris ca. 1520, nearly all undated. The present edition belongs to a line begun by Jean Janot in or around 1521 and the woodblocks for its illustrations were apparently cut at that time. Estienne Groulleau was an employee of Denis Janot (son of Jean Janot) and would marry his widow after his passing in 1544. The widow would first publish an edition herself in 1548. - Restorations to the head and foot of the first 15 leaves (never affecting the text) and some minor thumbing, but otherwise in good condition. A very rare French herbal, richly illustrated with about 300 woodcuts. {BN#50197}
¶ USTC 89605 (1 copy). Cf. Anderson, Illustrated hist. of herbals, pp. 98-105 (various eds.). Arber, Herbals, p. 274 (ca. 1520/26 Sergent ed.). Choulant, Graph. Inkunabeln IV (various eds.). Durling 2146f. (ca. 1520 Nyverd ed. for Petit). Fairfax Murray (French) 226 (ca. 1533/34 Denis Janot ed.). Hunger, Early herbals 37 (widow of Jean Janot edition). Hunt 35 (ca. 1533/34 Denis Janot ed.). Klebs, Early herbals 54-58 (various eds.). Nissen BBI 2335 (widow Denis Janot, 1548). Wellcome 3111-3113.

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Schilter, Johann. Codex juris Alemannici feudalis prout is in comitiis... Noricis anno MCCIIX [...]. Strasbourg, Spoor, 1697-1699. Strasbourg, Spoor, 1697-1699. Small 4to. 3 (instead of 6?) parts in 1 volume. (4), 12 pp., 221 double pages, (5), (24) pp. With 4 partly folded engraved plates. Contemporary calf, spine rebacked with giltstamped title label. All edges red.

EUR 450.00

First edition. - Bilingual edition of the Alemannic code of feudal law by the jurist and professor at the Strasbourg university, Schilter (1632-1705), who was celebrated for his "pioneering work" (cf. ADB) in this field. The present copy includes a transcript of the code of law in the original Low German text, accompanied by a Latin version "providing a new edition of the text" (cf. Stintzing/Landsberg), as well as the introduction ("praefatio"), which is bound after the five-page index. Lacks the commentary and the "Sachsenspiegel" as well as the chapter on feudal succession ("Commentatio ad libri secundi consuetudinum feudorum titulum quinquagesimum de natura successionis feudalis") and the legal texts by Anton Mincucci, Bartolomeo Baraterio, Anton Dadin Alteserra and Marc-Antoine Dominicy, frequently bound with the main title. However, three of the four plates (all bound immediately after the table of contents) belong to Mincucci and Barateri, while the fourth one shows the Anglo-Saxon alphabet, corresponding to paragraph XIV of the introduction. Schilter's 12-page "Mantissa" from 1699, not usually found in this compilation, is bound between the plates and the main part. - Pages 96-104 rather browned. Slightly brownstained throughout. A well-preserved, sympathetically rebacked copy. {BN#50457}
¶ Stintzing/Landsberg III/I, 59 & Noten 35f. M. Savigny VI, 307. ADB XXXI, 268. Cf. VD 17, 3:008991G. Kat. Bibl. Kammergericht Bln. 610 (2. A. v. 1728).

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Very rare first edition on weights and measures used in medicine

Rondelet, Guillaume. De ponderibus sive de iusta quantitate & proportione... medicamentorum, liber. Lyon, Matthias Bonhomme, 1560. Lyon, Matthias Bonhomme, 1560. 8vo. (24), 168, 26, (5), (1 blank) pp. With woodcut device on title-page and a woodcut portrait of Rondelet at the last page of the preliminaries. Contemporary limp sheepskin parchment.

EUR 3,500.00

Very rare first edition of an early pharmalogical book by the famous French phycisian, naturalist and botanist Guillaume Rondelet (1507-66), professor at the university of Montpellier, best known for his work on fishes De piscibus marinis (1554), the standard work on ichtyology for over a century. He was a good friend of Rabelais, whose character Rondibilis is said to be based on Rondelet, and among his students appear prominent names such as Clusius, Lobel, Gesner and Belon. The present work primarily deals with weights and measures used in medicine, with at the end a 26-page index with about 35 entries per page, listing both herbs and medicines. A second edition was published a year later by Plantin, followed by other editions in 1563 and 1564. - With owner's inscription of Pierre Gauthier (late 19th century?) on flyleaf. Waterstain at the head and fore-edge margin and the binding slightly soiled and rubbed along the extremities, otherwise in good condition. {BN#50202}
¶ USTC 113136 (5 copies). Cf. Durling 3925 (1563 ed.); Voet (1561 Plantin edition); Wellcome 551 (1561 and 1564 eds.); for Rondelet: DSB XI, 527f.; Hagelin, Old and rare books on materia medica, p. 102.

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Suicide and women’s oppression in modern societies: a unique, early essay by Marx

[Marx, Karl]. Peuchet: vom Selbstmord. (In:) [Hess, Moses]. Gesellschaftsspiegel. Organ... zur Vertretung der besitzlosen Volksklassen und zur Beleuchtung der gesellschaftlichen Zustände der Gegenwart. Zweiter Band (Heft VII bis Heft XII). Elberfeld, Julius Baedeker, 1846. Elberfeld, Julius Baedeker, 1846. 8vo. A total of 200 pp. and 88 pp. (journal proper and appendix of "news and notes" have separate paginations, each part consecutive from issue to issue), with several leaves inserted (VII: title, 36, 12 pp., 1 f.; VIII: title, [37]-72 pp., [13]-24 pp., 1 f.; IX: title, [73]-102 pp., [25]-42 pp., 1 f.; X: title, [103]-136 pp., [43]-56 pp., 1 f.; XI: title, [137]-168 pp., [57]-72 pp., 1 f.; XII: title, [169]-200 pp., [73]-88 pp., 1 f.). Contemporary marbled boards.

EUR 65,000.00

Moses Hess' "Gesellschaftsspiegel" was an influential journal of pre-revolutionary social criticism, counting among its authors Karl Marx and (as a more occasional contributor) Friedrich Engels, as well as Rudolf Matthäi, Hermann Püttmann, Heinrich Bürgers, Friedrich Schnake and Georg Weerth. The present volume, comprising the latter six of the total of twelve issues that appeared, contains what scholars have considered perhaps Marx's most singular publication: an article entitled "Peuchet: vom Selbstmord" (in issue VII, pp. 14-26). Compiled from translated excerpts from Jacques Peuchet’s "Du Suicide et de ses Causes", a chapter from the author's memoirs, this long-neglected Marx piece constitutes "a precious contribution to a richer understanding of the evils of modern bourgeois society, of the suffering that its patriarchal family structure inflicts on women, and of the broad and universal scope of socialism" (Michael Löwy, Unusual Marx, in: Monthly Review 53:10 [2002]). It was Marx's habit to compile such excerpts from other authors in his notebooks, but this is the only example of such a collection being published by himself, during his own lifetime. Curiously, as Löwy has pointed out, the author chosen is neither an economist, nor a historian, nor a philosopher, not even a socialist, but none other than a former head of the French police archives under the Restoration! Also, the excerpted work is not a scientific one, but a loose collection of 'life incidents', anecdotes, and small stories, followed by some comments. Nor does the subject matter of the article belong to what is usually considered the political or economic spheres, but has to do with private life, specifically suicide; the main social issue discussed in this connection is women’s oppression in modern societies. "Each one of these traits is unusual in Marx's bibliography, but in combination, they make this piece unique [...] Marx left his imprint on the text in several ways: by his introduction, by the comments with which he peppered the piece, by his selection of the excerpts, and by the modifications introduced through the translations. And the main reason why the piece can be considered as expressing Marx’s own views is that he introduced no distinction whatsoever between his own comments and the excerpts from Peuchet, so that the whole document appears as a homogeneous piece of writing, signed by Karl Marx" (Löwy). - Occasional insignificant edge flaws or remarginings (without loss to text); binding somewhat bumped at extremeties, but in all a fine survival. {BN#47795}
¶ Rubel 49. Stammhammer I, 90. MEGA I.3, 391-407. Not in Rost.

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The World's Two Greatest Living Arabian Stallions - Kaszimir and Ofir. The Third Recorded Copy

White, George Ransom. Polish vs. Egyptian Arabian Horses / Polski Arabski... kon a Egipski. My Visit to Polish State Stud / Moja Wizyta w Polskim Stadzie Panstwowym. Nashville, George Random White, [1938]. Nashville, George Random White, [1938]. 4to. 24 pp., including two black-and-white plates. Text in English and Polish. Bound in printed card covers as issued.

EUR 1,500.00

Sole edition of this extremely rare publication, printed for private circulation, describing with great excitement the Polish programme of Arabian horse-breeding in the 1930s. On the eve of WWII, Dr George White visited the Polish State Stud and provides an invaluable record of the horses kept there, listing the stallions and mares he saw by name, as well as the names of those recently deceased. In 1939-40, many of Poland's prized Arabians were confiscated by the Russian and German armies, virtually demolishing the breeding programme in that country. - White had travelled the world comparing Arabian horses, having visited Egypt already in 1929 for that purpose, but was awestruck by what he discovered in Poland: "I had seen Arabian horses on four of the five continents of the world, but never before had such an Arabian horse display been exhibited before me ... The Polish Arab is superior in all material respects to the Egyptian". The plate at the end depicts "the author's conception of the world's two greatest living Arabian stallions - Kaszimir and Ofir", belonging to Prince Witold Czartoryski and to the Polish State Stud respectively, and White offers the prediction that "the day is not far distant when the countries of the world will be looking toward Poland for suitable foundation stock in the form of mares and stallions to either start or improve their Arabian horse breeding projects". - George Ransom White (b. 1874) was a friend and advisor to General Jacob M. Dickinson (1890-1963), the owner of Travellers Rest Stud in Nashville, TN. Dickinson began to import Polish Arabians in 1938 following Dr White's advice. - Rare: OCLC shows two copies worldwide, at the National Library of Poland and the British Library. {BN#49647}

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[Walther, Bernhard. Private-law treatises, the code of civil procedure of... Lower Austria and other legal texts]. No place, (1551-1583). No place, (1551-1583). Folio (ca. 212 x 310 mm). German and Latin manuscript on paper. 258 ff., including 6 blank leaves. Contemporary full vellum with spine title and leather straps.

EUR 3,500.00

A unique compilation of 16th century Austrian legal texts, most of them by the lawyer and chancellor Bernhard Walther (1516-84), the "father of Austrian jurisprudence" (cf. Luschin-Ebengreuth 1896). Includes his code of procedure of Lower Austria (ordinaria and extraordinaria), of the lex familiae, an instruction for law students, the fees of the Lower Austrian chancellery, a copy of imperial privileges confirmed or newly issued by Emperor Charles V in 1522, an order by the Landmarschall of Lower Austria, Georg von Puchheim (died 1531), the rules for court hearings, including the hearing of witnesses, and regulations for procurators. Followed by 14 of Walther's famous 15 private-law treatises, omitting the one on familial trees. The treatises were edited and published by Max Rintelen in 1937, who, however, fails to note this manuscript source in his index of extant codices. - Folios 252-258 contain copies of imperial charters from 1528, 1568 and 1583, belonging to the treatise on fiefdom; folios 255-257 written by another hand. 1650 ownership by Hans Sauer v. Sauerburg, the town scribe of St. Pölten (1635-52), to flyleaf. - Binding somewhat brownstained, a little scratched. Cover warped, upper hinge starting. Paper evenly browned and brownstained throughout. Small tears to a few pages, mostly affecting the lower margins. Tear in f. 76 repaired with sealing wax. Flaws at the margins of the first page, rebacked with paper. Signs of use: some passages crossed out, old marginal annotations by another hand. Last in the library of the Viennese collector Werner Habel, with his signed and stamped ownership to front pastedown, dated 1978. {BN#48909}
¶ Not in M. Rintelen, Bernhard Walthers privatrechtliche Traktate aus dem 16. Jahrhundert (1937).

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18th century drawing of a lost 16th century (?) Islamic world map, centred on the Gulf, showing the Great Mosque and Ka'bah at Mecca, the Great Mosque at Medina, and five others in Iraq and North Africa

[World Map - Islamic Manuscript]. Map of the world centred on the Arabian... Gulf, showing seven mosques or minarets. Northern India or Kashmir?, late 18th century copy of a 16th century (?) original. Northern India or Kashmir?, late 18th century copy of a 16th century (?) original. 500 x 420 mm. Oval manuscript map in ink and watercolour (blue, brown, green and red; map image including water 295 x 380 mm, the land alone 220 x 305 mm) on a half sheet of extremely large European laid paper, with dozens of features labelled in Persian (written in black ink in the nastaliq script) and with animals (including elephants and a dragon), people and 4 European ships. Framed and matted.

EUR 75,000.00

An 18th century manuscript copy, in colour, of a lost map in the Islamic tradition, with dozens of inscriptions in Persian and extensive pictorial imagery showing numerous mosques, elephants in southern Africa, eastern India and what may be northern Bengal or part of Southeast Asia, snakes and a dragon (with four feet and two pair of wings) in East Asia, birds north of the Caucasus and people in Europe north of the Alps. The regions with people and animals (excluding the dragon and snakes) are also the only regions shown wooded. The oval land is surrounded by oceans with a European ship at each of the four cardinal compass directions: three 3-masted ships flying flags with St George's cross (used by the crusaders, Knights Templar and English and French troops from the 12th century and by the Genoese and others from the 13th century: while it is not St George come to slay the dragon, these European ships in an Islamic map remain a puzzle), and at the south a 2-masted ship with no rectangular flag, all four ships accompanied by rowboats. Inlets can be identified as the Arabian Gulf, the Gulf of Oman, the Red Sea, the Mediterranean, the Black Sea (?) and another in the Far East. A wide straight band of mountains runs west to east from coast to coast, apparently representing the Alps, the Caucasus and the Himalayas, with a few additional mountains in southern India and elsewhere. One can clearly see the Tigris and Euphrates rivers as well as the rivers of the Indus and Ganges valleys. After one passes beyond Bengal it becomes more difficult to identify the topographic features that ought to represent Southeast and East Asia: there is no island to represent Japan, and the peninsula that faintly resembles Korea seems more likely to be China. While some pictorial elements and lettering are designed to be viewed from various sides as one turns the map, there is a distinct bias in the lettering and some of the pictures for west at the head, which is quite unusual (most Islamic maps have south at the head). - We have found no record of any closely similar map, but the topography certainly owes something to the traditional Islamic world maps, perhaps by the 10th-century Abu al-Hasan al-Harrani or his followers such as the 15th-century Ibn al-Wardi. Like most maps in the Islamic tradition (including those of al-Bakri and al-Istakhri), these follow the Greek tradition of Anaximander (6th century BC) in depicting the world as an almost perfectly geometric circle surrounded by the great river or sea Oceanus, and also representing other features with abstract forms. They show the Nile running into the Mediterranean and (almost as its continuation north of the Mediterranean) a channel leading to the Black Sea, which continues via the river Phasis to the northern coast, forming a boundary between Europe and Asia. The present map is much more naturalistic, with an oval form and irregular coastlines. The inlets and rivers also have more naturalistic forms, and the map shows much more detail than do the traditional Greek and Islamic maps (one can recognize Qatar and Ceylon/Sri Lanka, and one of the two islands in the Mediterranean probably represents Crete (is the other Ceylon, Sicily, an oversized Malta, or something else?). Yet in spite of its greater detail and naturalism, its geography is in some ways less accurate than that of its more abstract ancestors. Like the al-Harrani and al-Wardi maps, the Nile has an L shape (though not rigidly geometric like theirs), but the southern end connects to the Red Sea and the northern end passes east of the Mediterranean, continuing directly into the channel leading to the northern coast (with no graphic distinction between the Black Sea and the channel to Oceanus). The Nile also appears to contain an enormous island, but the tower at its northern end might possibly represent the 13th-century minaret at Luxor. The Mediterranean appears as a triangular inlet without even a bulge to suggest Greece or Italy, which many Islamic and Greek maps show clearly. Africa and India extend no farther south than the Arabian Peninsula, with only the Red Sea and the Gulfs separating them. Some Mughal maps, such as that of Sadiq Isfahani (ca. 1647), share the more naturalistic depiction, and Isfahani also depicts Ceylon similarly, but his map shows few geographic or topographic similarities. - Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the present map is the depiction of mosques and minarets, which are so detailed that many can be identified even without recourse to the Persian inscriptions. The rectangular wall of the Great Mosque at Mecca appears clearly with the Ka'bah in the centre and four minarets, one at each corner. This also suggests a latest possible date for the lost original, for three more minarets were added in quick succession, apparently between 1603 and 1629. A recent study suggests that the Ka'bah began to appear in Islamic maps only ca. 1450 (Karen Pinto, "Medieval Islamic maps", 2016, not seen, but cf. Arnoud Vrolijk in Mols & Buitelaar, eds., "Hajj: global interactions through pilgrimage", 2015, p. 216), suggesting that the lost model for the present map with many mosques, some shown in detail, was at least several decades later. This evidence for a date, combined with the naturalistic depiction, suggests the lost model for the present map might have originated in the Islamic realms of 16th-century India. The Great Mosque at Medina is also clearly depicted. Pending more information about the Persian inscriptions (which apparently name regions, cities, mosques, topographic features and curiosities), we can only guess at the other mosques or minarets. We noted one perhaps at Luxor. Two on the eastern side of the Euphrates might be at Basra and Aleppo (with some pyramids in between), while one in North Africa looks like the Great Mosque at Taza and the other might be at Fez. There may some buildings in East Asia, by the mountains near the dragon, but they may merely be smoke or flames from what appear to be burning rocks. A couple of other sites show fortress-like walls (in red in the northern parts of the Arabian Peninsula and India) without a mosque or minaret. - The map is stunning as a work of art, a fusion of age-old tradition with modern techniques of illustration and figural representation, executed in pastel colours with the mountains and ships in several shades of brown, Oceanus and the inlets light blue, the rivers grey, the forests and dragon green and occasional small details in red or pink. In spite of its large size, the map is drawn on a half sheet, so that the whole sheet would measure at least 84 x 50 cm, considerably larger than Imperial and one of the largest sheet sizes produced in the 18th century. The chainlines are about 28.5 mm apart. The watermark or countermark would fall in the middle of the map image, so that it is not identifiable in the framed map. One can make out only some diagonal lines that might belong to a letter W. The map is numbered "No 95" in an 18th-century hand at the upper left, so it may have once been part of a manuscript atlas. - Formerly folded once horizontally and vertically. In very good condition. An 18th century copy of a lost 16th century (?) Islamic map of the world, showing seven mosques or minarets, unlike any other map known to us. {BN#48677}

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Pasteur, Louis, French chemist and microbiologist (1822-1895). Letter signed ("L. Pasteur"). Paris, 4. II. 1892. Paris, 4. II. 1892. 8vo (171 x 108 mm). 2 pp.

EUR 3,500.00

In French, to an unidentified colleague: "We do not vaccinate dogs because it would create too much congestion and our kennels would not be big enough to take them all in. The law is definite: Any dog bitten by a dog either rabid or suspected of being rabid must be put down. However I find it very hard to give you a negative answer if the dog belongs to you and you want to keep it. If this is the case, send your dog to the Institute Pasteur tomorrow and it will be vaccinated during the following three weeks." - An important letter in which Pasteur quotes the law on rabid dogs but shows a softer side when it comes to saving a beloved pet. On his personalized stationery; four punctures at left margin not affecting text. {BN#44261}

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al-Mahdi al-Hafni, Muhammad / Marcel, Jean Joseph (transl.). Les dix soirées malheureuses; contes d'Abd-Errahman, traduits de... l'Arabe, d'après un manuscrit du Cheykh El-Mohdy [...]. Paris/Leipzig, Schubart & Heideloff, 1828. Paris/Leipzig, Schubart & Heideloff, 1828. 8vo. 3 volumes. XXXVI, 214 pp. (4), 260 pp. (4), 284 pp. Marbled endpapers. Contemporary red half calf with giltstamped spine and spine title. All edges sprinkled red.

EUR 3,500.00

First edition; extremely rare. - Ten Arabian tales translated by the French orientalist Marcel (1776-1854), a member of the scientific commission accompanying Napoelon's Egyptian expedition and later the director of the National Press in Cairo. More common in the 1829 Renouard edition (the only one listed in library catalogues), the work belongs to the genre of Mirrors for Princes. This earlier edition does not include the engraved frontispieces and the portrait of Cheykh El-Mohdy (Muhammad al-Mahdi, 1737-1815) featured in the 1829 issue. - Insignificant waterstaining to upper margins of vols. 2 and 3, otherwise in fine condition. The only specimen of the 1828 first edition that could be traced. {BN#33243}
¶ Dantès, Dictionnaire biographique et bibliographique 652. Cf. Gay 1869 (1829 ed., title erroneously cited as "les dix soirées musulmanes"). Beck, Allg. Repertorium der in- und ausländischen Literatur für 1830, 142 (1829 ed.). This edition not in OCLC.

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The Arab stud founded in Saint-Cloud by King Louis-Philippe, in 36 splendid coloured plates: the patron's copy

Adam, Victor. Les chevaux des écuries du Roi. Paris, Tessari & Cie, impression A. Godard, [1843]. Paris, Tessari & Cie, impression A. Godard, [1843]. Folio (425 x 585 mm). 36 hand-coloured lithographic plates in 6 livraisons, each preserving its original printed wrapper. Contemp. black quarter shagreen with decorated flat spine, title stamped in gilt on upper cover with a crowned monogram.

EUR 195,000.00

The only complete copy known of this record of the Arab stud of the French King, consisting of 36 superb horse plates drawn from nature and lithographed by the noted equestrian painter Victor Adam (1801-66), finely enhanced with watercolour and gum arabic by the artist himself. The plates were produced in 1843 with the special permission of the Marquis de Strada, stablemaster to the French King, when Louis-Philippe created a stud in the park of Saint-Cloud for the stallions he had received as gifts from the Viceroy of Egypt and other Middle Eastern princes. A contemporary witness to the event, the conte Camille de Montalivet reflected after the fall of the monarchy in his "Le Roi Louis-Philippe et sa liste civile" (1850): "At the end of the year 1842, Mehmet Ali sent to the King seven of his purest stallions, chosen by himself and coming from the most precious Arab race, the Nedjdi species. From the first months of 1843, Louis-Philippe founded an Arab stud in the park of Saint-Cloud, providing one of the most beautiful equestrian centers ever seen. The first tests soon had the best result, and new stallions arrived from Muscat and Morocco". - Muhammad Ali (1769-1849), generally considered the founder of modern Egypt, was Khedive of Egypt from 1804 to his death. A friend of France and an admirer of Napoleon, he had previously offered to King Louis-Philippe (in 1833) the obelisk which graces the Place de la Concorde in Paris. - The six livraisons of six plates each comprise: "Chevaux andalous du Roi et des Princes" (1); "Haras arabe fondé par le Roi à St Cloud. Chevaux Nedjdi offerts au Roi des Français par le Vice-Roi d'Egypte" (2, 4, 5); "Chevaux du Maroc offerts par l'Empereur Muley-abd-err-Rhamann à sa Majesté le Roi des Français" (3); and "Chevaux Mascate offerts au Roi des Français par l'Imam" (6). In addition to the printed dedication to the marquis de Strada, our copy bears an autograph gift inscription to the King's stablemaster "par son humble et très obeissant serviteur David". The plates in livraisons 3, 4, and 6 belong to the 100 printed "avant la lettre"; livraison 4 includes 4 pp. of explanatory text. - Jean-Victor-Vincent Adam joined art school at the early age of 13 and soon enjoyed high acclaim as a painter of horses and equestrian historical scenes (cf. Thieme/B. I, 69). "Il fut donc un spécialiste dans ce genre et son nom mérite au premier titre de figurer dans uns bibliographie hippique" (Menessier de la Lance I, 6). After several successful exhibitions, he learned lithography in 1824, producing nearly eight thousand different subjects. - Plates professionally cleaned with some traces of foxing. A unique set; unrecorded in trade or auction, no other copy traced in public collections. {BN#48770}

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With a map of the Gulf, a description of El-Katif, and the story of the pearl of the Imam of Muscat

Tavernier, Jean-Baptiste. Collections of travels through Turky into Persia, and... the East-Indies. Giving an account of the present state of those countries. London, Moses Pitt, 1684. London, Moses Pitt, 1684. Folio (214 x 310 mm). 6 parts in one vol. (18), 264 pp. (2), 214 pp. (2), 66 pp, (2). (12), 14, (4), 15-46, (4), 47-87, (1) pp. (6), 113, (1) pp. 154, (2) pp. With 17 full-page engr. plates, 13 folding plates, and numerous text illustrations (including plates of Arabian coins, the great name of Allah, and other Arabian inscriptions). Contemp. calf, spine rebacked.

EUR 15,000.00

Rare first collected edition of Tavernier's works, profusely illustrated with a fold-out map of the Arabian Gulf, an unusual, large map of Japan, and a fold-out map of the Great Moghul. Comprising: 1) The First Book of Monsieur Taverner's [!] Persian Travels; 2) The Six Trabels of John Baptista Tavernier [...] Through Turky and Persia to the Indies: 3) A Relation of Japon; 4) A New and Particular Relation of the Kingdom of Tunquin; 5) A New Relation of the Inner-Part of the Grand Seignor's Seraglio; 6) The History of the Late Revolution of the Dominions of the Great Mogol. A rare and interesting account of Turkey, Persia, India, Japan, Tonkin, and Formosa. "The Persian Gulf is the most dangerous Gulf I know, by reason of the shallowness and sharp promontories that point out into Sea [...] The Merchant would be glad to find a way through the Coast of Arabia to get to Mascate [...] Elcatif a Sea Town in Arabia, where there is a fishery for Pearls that belong to the Emir of Elcatif" (pt. I, p. 95; "Qatif" being an oasis in Saudi Arabia). Chapter XI (p. 49) of the first part deals with the breeding and nature of camels; chapter III (p. 64) mentions a voyage to Mecca; chapter XXIII (p. 255) deals with the island of Ormus (with the map of the Arabian Gulf). - The second part begins with a discussion of Arabian currency and is illustrated with plates of Arabian coinage. The most important story is perhaps that of “The Imam of Muscat Pearl - That Surpassed in Beauty All Other Pearls in the World”. In chapter XVIII of book II, "Of Pearles and the places where to find them" (p. 145), Tavernier states: "In the first place, there is a Fishery for Pearls in the Persian Gulf, round about the Island of Bakren. It belongs to the King of Persia, and there is a strong Fort in it, Garrison'd with three hundred men." Tavernier then narrates: "There is a wondrous Pearl in the possession of an Arabian Prince, that took Mascate from the Portugals. He then call'd himself Imenhect Prince of Masscaté; being known before only by the name of Aceph Ben-Ali Prince of Norennaé. It is but a small Province, but it is the best of all in the Happy Arabia. Therein grow all things necessary for the life of man; particularly, delicate fruits, but more especially most excellent Grapes, which would make most incomparable Wine. This Prince has the most wonderful Pearl in the world, not so much for its bigness, for it weighs not above twelve Carats and one sixteenth, nor for its perfect roundness, but because it is so clear and so transparent that you may almost see through it. The Great Mogul offer'd him by a Banian forty thousand Crowns for his Pearl, but he would not accept it." The use of the phrase "clear and lustrous as to appear translucent" seem to indicate a white or colorless pearl, the most sought-after color in pearls, with an optimum of lustre and orient caused by the reflection and refraction of light, respectively. The surface quality of the pearl must be exceptional and almost blemish-free in order to characterize it as a specimen surpassing in beauty all other pearls in the world, at that time. The fact that the pearl was in the possession of the Imam of Muscat in the mid-17th century indicates without any doubt that the pearl originated in the most ancient pearl fishing grounds in the world, the Arabian Gulf, most probably in the kingdom of Oman itself, at its very doorstep - on the pearl banks situated closer to the country's shoreline in the Gulf or the Strait of Hormuz. Oyster bearing reefs were well distributed throughout the Gulf, but were greater in abundance on the Arabian side of the Gulf than the Persian one. The pearls are depicted on a plate opposite page 150: "Figure one is of a Pearl which the King of Persia bought at the Fishery of Catifa in Arabia. It cost him 32,000 Tomans, or 1,400,000 Livres of our Money, at forty-six Livres and six Deneers to a Toman. It is the fairest and most perfect Pearl that ever was yet found to this hour, having no defect". {BN#45106}
¶ Blackmer 1632. Wing T251A, T252, T253. Campbell (Japan) 28. Cox I, 275f. OCLC 6071990. Cf. Wilson 223. Howgego T14. Severin 104-113. Not in Atabey or Weber.

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Auerbach [?] of Her Britannic Majesty's Consulate, Trieste. Autograph letter signed. Triest, 14. VI. 1898. Triest, 14. VI. 1898. 12mo. 9 pp. On three bifoliums attached to one another with green string.

EUR 2,500.00

To an unidentified recipient, responding to an enquiry regarding "the probable price of a pair of horses about 5 hands". "The kind of horses that you speak of are known here as 'Jukers', light, active, strong [...], fast trotting, able to go 14 kilometres an hour. A pair of horses of such description 5 years old & sound will cost ybout fls 1200 or say £100. Hungarian horses in my opinion will suit the best for your Island [Cyprus, as revealed later in the letter] as they have Arab blood in them". He explains that he is not a dealer himself, "but being very fond of horses & having many native friends in India I have very often occasions to buy for them & also for my brother who resides in Bombay at present". He explains that "no good horses are to be found in Trieste", and that "as a rule" he visits "the fairs in the interior" to buy horses. He names the 4 breeding farms of the Hungarian and describes the types of horses bred at each ("lastly the Fogaras stud where stallions from the Lipizza private farm belonging to the Emperor are supplied"). Describes the auction of the "superfluous horses of these establishments of the age of 4 & 5" at "Tattersall's in Budapest in the 1st week of October", with prices for each type of horse, giving examples from his own experience. "Two British Cavalry officers belonging to the Egyptian Army came over here in the Autumn of 1896. They bought 60 [...] for the Egyptian cavalry. The Greek Cavalry & Artillery are wholly supplied with horses from Hungary". While discussing "sires for breeding purposes" mentions that he knows "the Director of the Lipizza farm [...] personally" and gives the price by which he is offered superior horses by him. Ends with details of possible "charge for freight on each horse to Cyprus". - Text clear and complete. {BN#49331}

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Zillesen, Cornelis. Wysgeerig onderzoek, wegens Neerlands opkomst, bloei, en welvaard;... het daarop gevolgd verval, en wat de nog overgeblevene middelen van herstel zijn, zo in staatsbestuur, financie, landbouw, koophandel, zeevaart, fabrieken en industrie. Amsterdam, Johannes Allart, 1796. Amsterdam, Johannes Allart, 1796. 8vo. (4), 534, (6) pp. Contemporary boards, rebacked with modern spine and gilt label.

EUR 450.00

First and only edition. A treatise on the rise and heyday of the Republic in the 17th century, its decline in the 18th century, and the means to restore its government, finances, agriculture, trade, shipping and industry. Zillesen (1736-1828) was a prolific writer on history, water management, currency and taxation. He belonged to the patriotic party and was a member of various scholarly societies. - Some browning to margins; binding rubbed and bumped. {BN#48671}
¶ NNBW IX, k.1313. OCLC 63825492. Not in EHB, Kress, etc.

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Heuvel, Hendrik Herman van den / Rogge, Adriaan / Zillesen, Cornelis. Antwoord op de vraag [...]: Welk is de... grond van Hollandsch koophandel, van zynen aanwas en bloei? Welke oorzaaken en toevallen hebben dien tot heden aan veranderingen en verval blootgesteld? Welke middelen zyn best geschikt en gemakkelykst te vinden, om denzelven in zyne tegenwoordige gesteldheid te bewaren, zyne verbetering te bevorderen, en den hoogsten trap van volkomenheid te doen bereiken? Haarlem, J. Bosch, 1775. Haarlem, J. Bosch, 1775. In: [Natuurkundige verhandelingen van de Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen te Haarlem]. Verhandelingen, uitgegeeven door de Hollandsche Maatschappye de weetenschappen, te Haarlem. XVI. deel. 8vo. XXXVI, 548, (6) pp. With engraved frontispiece and engraved title vignette. Contemporary half calf with giltstamped red label to gilt spine.

EUR 500.00

First and only edition, published as volume 16 of the Proceedings of the Dutch Scientific Society: three award-winning essays in response to the Society's prize question, "Which is the basis of Dutch commerce, the cause of its increase and flourishing? What causes and contingencies have so far subjected it to change and decline? Which means are best to keep it in its present state, to promote its improvement, and to achive the highest stage of perfection?" - Van den Heuvel, registrar of the Court of Justice in Utrecht, gave the response awarded with the gold medal; it led the Society to establish an Economic Branch in the following year. In 1778 another French translation appeared. The third treatise is the first work by Cornelis Zillesen, later known as a writer on history and finance and a specialist in the field of water management. He belonged to the leaders of the patriotic party in Schiedam and, after the oppression of the patriots, spent several years in France. - Bookplate of the "Bibliothek van de Doopsgezinde Gemeente bij het Kam en den Toren te Amsterdam". Untrimmed copy. {BN#48628}
¶ EHB 1244. Laspeyres B.520-522 & p. 155. NNBW IX, k.1313.

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Mailer, Norman. The Big Bite. Typed manuscript signed ("Norman Mailer"). No place, April 1963. No place, April 1963. 4to. 5 double-spaced typed leaves (watermarked "Millers Falls Ezerase"). With a manual correction on the first leaf.

EUR 1,500.00

Manuscript for Mailer's monthly Esquire column "The Big Bite", signed by the author on the last leaf. Incipit: "The rite of spring is in the odor of the air." Mailer depicts the doomsday atmosphere of New York during the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962. Esquire published Mailer's column from November 1962 through December 1963, when the writer began devoting the space to the serialization of his novel "The American Dream". According to his secretary at the time, Anne Berry, Mailer handed her the first draft of a column, which she typed triple-spaced, gave it back for editing, and then typed it again double-spaced (cf. Mills, Mailer. A Biography, p. 263). This manuscript thus belongs to the second, edited version of the column. - Folded twice. {BN#46225}
¶ Adams p. 10.

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Ode to the Persian Gulf

Irwin, Eyles. A Series of Adventures in the Course of... a Voyage up the Red-Sea, on the Coasts of Arabia and Egypt; and of a Route Through the Desarts of Thebais, Hitherto Unknown to the European Traveller, in the Year MDCCLXXVII. In letters to a Lady. London, J. Dodsley, 1780. London, J. Dodsley, 1780. 4to. XVI, 400 pp. With 3 folding maps and 3 plates. Contemporary full calf, spine elaborately gilt, leading edges gilt, red morocco label.

EUR 12,500.00

Second edition (the earliest mentioned). Irwin relates the series of misadventures which occurred on his journey back from India after his dismissal from the East India Company. Following the near wreck of his ship he was taken prisoner by Arabs who took him to the Nile, whence he travelled to Cairo on his release. - The East India Company servant Eyles Irwin, born in Calcutta in 1751, was appointed to survey the Black Town in 1771 and "was made superintendent of the lands belonging to Madras [...] In 1776 he became caught up in the political storm that overtook the governor of Madras, George Pigot, who was placed in confinement by members of his own council. Irwin supported Pigot, and in August he was suspended from the company's service. Early in 1777 he left India in order to seek redress in England. Irwin later published an account of his journey home, which was entitled 'A series of adventures [...]'. In this he displayed his classical education and described his experiences and observations during the journey, which lasted eleven months [...] Irwin returned to India in 1780 as a senior merchant and his route was again overland, but this time via Aleppo, Baghdad, and the Persian Gulf" (ODNB). The author recounts his imprisonment in Yanbu, Arabia, and further voyage to Jeddah, as well as his adventures in Egypt, his journeys through the Peloponnese and Balkans as well as Persia. He includes an "Ode to the Persian Gulf", which extols the beauties of Bahrain. In 1802, Irwin was to produce a musical play, "The Bedouins, or Arabs of the Desert: a Comic Opera in Three Acts" (1802), which played in Dublin for three nights. - The plates include views of the town of Mocha (al-Mukhah) on the shore of the Red Sea in Yemen, including its early mosques, and of the Straits of Bab al Mandab ("Babelmandel"). Also shown is a detailed view and chart of Yanbu, the port giving access to al Medina. - Macclesfield bookplates to front pastedown and free endpaper. Plates somewhat toned and offset, otherwise an excellent copy, sumptuously bound. {BN#48764}
¶ Macro 1293. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 325. Gay 66. Brunet III, 459. Blackmer 865. Cf. Weber II, 576 (3rd ed.).

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